RVing Canada
Sign up for a
feed and get posts automatically.rss

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Canadians urged to buy RVs at home, not in USA

(Sept. 15, 2008) -- With the rise of the Canadian dollar over the past year, some Canadians have been quick to assume that buying all goods in the United States will save them money. However, when buying an RV, it can in fact be more expensive and troublesome to buy from a dealer located across the border.

According to Canadian RV dealers, the strength of the Canadian dollar over many months has enabled them to have more buying power when purchasing from manufacturers. This means that Canadian RV dealers are often able to offer the same prices as U.S. dealers can.

"It's a myth that everything is cheaper in the U.S.," said Go RVing Canada Spokesperson Catherine Fortin LeFaivre. "And in fact, when considering all of the hassle and the costs associated with bringing a vehicle across the border, most Canadians are better off purchasing their RV at their local Canadian RV dealership."

Factors to consider that might make an RV cross border shopping experience more expensive and troublesome than previously assumed include:

--Numerous brokerage and duty fees associated with importing a vehicle into Canada.
--Travel costs (hotel, gas, food) associated with traveling a longer distance to shop and buy the unit.
--The cost of the difference of the exchange rate (if the Canadian dollar is not exactly at par).
--Lengthy vehicle importation paperwork required by Canada Border Agency and Transport Canada.
--Temporary licensing requirement to bring the vehicle home.
--Costs and work of converting an RV to comply with numerous Canadian standards (which differ from U.S. standards) within a limited time period.
--Extra service costs for warranty repairs.
--The unavailability of financing at some U.S. dealership due to Canadian residency/ citizenship.
--Insurance and registration complications.

"It's important to be able to maintain a relationship with your local RV dealer so that he or she can offer you advice and assistance about your RV for many years to come," said Fortin LeFaivre. "When buying from a U.S. dealer, it makes it very difficult and costly for the customer to just pop in and ask for help."

Before assuming that cross border will save a Canadian consumer money, Go RVing Canada recommends checking with local Canadian RV dealers to see if a similar price to that of the U.S. dealer can be offered and to examine the advantages of local service. "Buying from a Canadian RV dealer can often times save you time, hassle, and money," said Fortin LeFaivre.

4 Comments:

  • What a load of crap! We just bought a beautiful 40 foot Holiday Rambler Endeavor ('06, 5000 miles) from a dealership in Fife, Washington that we could not find anywhere in Canada! As for duties, extra hotel costs and extra insurance, all of it added up to almost $500.00. No modifications were necessary for this motorhome to comply with Canadian standards.

    Lots of extra charges? Don't be fooled by these protectionist Canadian people who offer poorer service and charge more for a vehicle with half of the options Americans are used to.

    It took us a little bit extra work, but the dealership went out of its way to do the necessary paperwork and expidite the exportation of the vehicle. After all was said and done, I figured we saved at least $20,000.00 and had a better vehicle than one we couldn't find in Canada. Once Canadian dealers carry better inventory and more selection with more polite and informed salesmen at better prices, then of course we will shop at home: who wouldn't?

    Until then, shop around and buy where you want to. It is really not
    that difficult to import a vehicle. The Canadian Government has a detailed website that shows which vehicles are importable and which are not.

    Happy camping from a seasoned buyer!

    Guy Ethier
    Surrey, BC, Canada

    By Blogger chefethier, at September 20, 2008 9:09 AM  

  • We agree with Guy. We bought a new 2005 Damon in Michigan and saved close to $45K over the Canadian price of same model being sold in Ontario. Now let us take a look at Ms LeFaivre's comments:
    Numerous brokerage and duty fees associated with importing a vehicle into Canada - NO BROKER REQUIRED AND READ NAFTA - NO DUTY ON NORTH AMERICAN BUILT MOTORHOMES.
    --Travel costs (hotel, gas, food) associated with traveling a longer distance to shop and buy the unit - SHOPPED AND BOUGHT ON-LINE FROM A REPUTABLE DEALER. WE LIVE 8 HOURS FROM THE DEALER.
    --The cost of the difference of the exchange rate (if the Canadian dollar is not exactly at par).- CDN $ WAS WORTH .82US AT THE TIME AND WE STILL SAVED CLOSE TO $45K.
    --Lengthy vehicle importation paperwork required by Canada Border Agency and Transport Canada.- ALL PAPERWORK DONE BY THE DEALERSHIP - TOOK US ALL OF 20 MINUTES TO CLEAR CANADIAN CUSTOMS.
    --Temporary licensing requirement to bring the vehicle home. - DEALER PROVIDED TEMPORARY PLATES WHICH WERE VALID FOR 15 DAYS, EVEN IN CANADA.
    --Costs and work of converting an RV to comply with numerous Canadian standards (which differ from U.S. standards) within a limited time period. - RIV.CA ADVISES WHICH MOTORHOMES CAN BE IMPORTED INTO CANADA WITHOUT REQUIREMENT FOR ANY MODIFICATIONS. THE DAMON MET ALL CANADIAN STANDARDS.
    --Extra service costs for warranty repairs. - HAD WARRANTY WORK DONE IN CANADA WITHOUT ANY EXTRA COSTS INVOLVED.
    --The unavailability of financing at some U.S. dealership due to Canadian residency/ citizenship. - CANNOT COMMENT ON THIS AS WE PAID CASH.
    --Insurance and registration complications. - WE HAD ALLSTATE INSURANCE FOR OUR HOME AND AUTOS AND SIMPLY ADDED THE MOTORHOME TO OUR POLICY WITHOUT ANY HASSLES. AFTER BEING INSPECTED BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT'S AUTHORIZED AGENT (CANADIAN TIRE AT THE TIME), WE WERE GIVEN A SIGNED COPY THAT THE MOTORHOME MET CANADIAN STANDARDS, WENT TO THE LICENSE BUREAU AND REGISTERED THE MOTORHOME.

    We really resent these scare tactics being used by Canadian dealers or their agents.

    We recently went to an RV dealer in Orleans, Ontario and looked at a 5th wheel. Price $82K. Looked on-line and found the same model for sale in Indiana for $51K. That's a $31K difference. You can have a lot of meals and hotel stays for that type on money.

    By Blogger Jennette, at September 20, 2008 11:26 AM  

  • This article is TOTAL BS. I was in Arizona last Dec. and was offered a way better deal on trading in my old TT for a new one. No stealer in Canada would even come close to the deal offered there.
    Seann Fox

    By Blogger Fox, at September 22, 2008 10:04 AM  

  • The Canadian RV industry talking head spews nothing but utter non-sense! The Canadian dealers, and that includes cars & light trucks, have been screwing the Canadian buyers for years.

    Since our dollar has increased in value, Canadian shoppers can’t get across the border fast enough..... evidenced by line ups of up to 3 hours on some weekends. Just ask the American RV dealers within 200 miles of the boarder or at snowbird destinations, they’re having one of their best ever sales years in spite of the ravaged US economy.

    By Blogger another poor rv'er, at November 8, 2008 3:17 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home