Monday, January 30, 2023

MENU

16 ways bungee cords can make RVing life easier

Bungee cords come in a variety of sizes and strengths (this is the variety pack I like and suggest). You may already use them to secure the RV cupboard doors during travel days by wrapping the cord through the cupboard’s opposing handles. There are so many ways that bungee cords can make RVing easier.

Note: When attempting to fasten a screw or other mounting device to your RV walls, take special care. The walls can be flimsy, and you don’t want to harm your rig.

Hang it up

  • Lanterns. A bungee cord can brighten up your campsite as it holds a lantern from a nearby tree branch or from the middle of your screened tent.
  • Hammock. If you’re camped in a spot that allows it, use heavy-duty bungee cords to securely fasten a hammock between trees.
  • Clothesline. Need to dry those swim towels? A bungee can make a temporary clothesline for you.
  • Cords, hoses, and wires. We use a variety of bungee cords to help corral our electrical cords, hoses, and more in our RV basement. Once secured, we hang the cords, etc., from a pegboard hook.
  • Paper towels. Run a bungee cord through the paper towel tube and then faster the bungee cord from your grill or picnic table. The towels will be within easy reach and not be blown away by the wind.
  • Pan lids. Horizontally fasten two bungees to the inside door of a kitchen cabinet. Slip cooking lids between the cords for easy storage.

Keep it together

  • Trash can. Keep the outdoor trash can liner secured. Place the liner inside the can as usual. Then pull the liner up and over the top lip of the bin and secure it in place by wrapping a bungee cord around the can and liner. Use two additional cords to keep the lid from blowing away. Hook the cords in the shape of an “x” over the lid and hook the cords on the trash can handles.
  • Lawn chair repair. Weave the cords across the backrest or seat of a broken lawn chair for an emergency fix.
  • Grocery bags. Keep those grocery bags upright all the way home from the store. Here’s how: Line up the bags in a row. Thread a cord through the handles of all the bags. Then fasten the cord ends on the hooks found on either side of the truck bed.
  • Fire extinguisher and propane tanks. Use bungee cords to keep fire extinguishers upright and secure. The same goes for propane tanks.
  • Basement items. Keep your water softener, tool chest, and other items upright and secure with a bungee cord. We’ve attached D-rings to the basement walls and fasten bungee cords from the rings.
  • Tablecloth. Keep your picnic tablecloth in place by wrapping a bungee cord around each end of the table.
  • Shoe holder. Horizontally fasten two cords to a wall near your RV door. Tuck sandals and flip flops behind the cords to keep footwear handy when needed and out of the way when not.
  • Map trapper. Use a horizontally mounted bungee cord to hold your road atlas, maps, books, and magazines in your RV. Simply open the book and tuck one side behind the cord and let the other side rest outside the cord.
  • Wheel covers and more. Bungee cords will help secure covers to your RV tires. They can also help secure bicycles, kayaks, or other items you take along when camping.
  • Exercise. Bungees can be used in place of exercise tension bands.

Can you add more uses for bungee cords while RVing? Please do so in the comments below.

##RVDT2041

Advertisement/Affiliate

If you value what you learn from RVtravel.com, would you please consider becoming a voluntary subscriber by pledging your support? Every contribution, no matter how modest, helps us serve you better. Thank youLearn more here.

Facebook Groups you might like
RVing with Dogs
RV Tech Tips
RV Advice
Towing Behind a Motorhome
RVing Over 70
. . . and the official RVtravel.com Facebook page

Winterizing your RV this season? Amazon has a wide choice of RV antifreeze.

Comments

3.8 12 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe to comments
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

21 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Impavid
2 days ago

A bungee cord to work, generally needs to be affixed to two points. Always fix one end and then “push” the other end away from you. That will prevent an end coming at you if you “pull” the bungee towards you and something lets go.

wanderer
7 days ago

Was sick of wearing out those cheesy ‘grass’-covered stair covers. Got a heavy rubber stair tread (with the little knobs all over). A pair of strong black bungees, one at each far edge, has held this on tight for a couple of years now. Works better, cleans better.

Denise
7 days ago
Reply to  wanderer

We use zip ties on our stair covers to keep them tight.

Jack
7 days ago

Keeper brand bungees are some of the best out there . I also use their loop knob bungee ties. Cheap bungees are bad news. They don’t last and shouldn’t be trusted.

Warmonk
7 days ago

Use of bungee cords is a major cause of eye injury. I’ve worked with companies that have outright banned their use.

May I suggest an article that describes this issue:

https://visionsource-tiftonfamilyeyecare.com/2014/07/23/bungee-cords-are-a-leading-cause-of-serious-eye-injuries/

Gigi
7 days ago

Another thing along this line…Go to Dollar tree and buy a 10 pack of the strongest hair ties, they are good for keeping all those small cords neat. Like phone cords, wrap them in a neat little circle, put a hair tie around the middle and they stay neat in a small bunch. They are better than rubber bands as they are softer and don’t break. I use them for cords on my small appliances, like my power tools, and extension cords too.

John S
7 days ago

I use them to help tie things down. Pretty unique, huh?

Dan
7 days ago
Reply to  John S

Will they also work to tie things up, or is it down only?

John S
7 days ago
Reply to  Dan

Hmmmm…you pose an interesting question.

Mr. T
7 days ago
Reply to  Dan

More study is needed in this area

Scott
6 days ago
Reply to  Mr. T

apply for a federal grant to study this serious issue, there has to be a bungee lobby group that will help

Mr. T
7 days ago
Reply to  John S

You are a genius!

Bob p
7 days ago

I would think a bungee cord holding a wheel cover on the wheel would throw the wheel assembly out of balance. Sounds like some AI writing here, just pick a subject and start typing. Lol

Sandi Pearson
7 days ago
Reply to  Bob p

I think they mean cover as in sun shade wheel cover not like wheel cover hub cap..

Bob p
7 days ago
Reply to  Sandi Pearson

She didn’t specify that, that’s why I said AI writing.

wanderer
7 days ago
Reply to  Bob p

Sounds like a reading comprehension problem.

Gail
6 days ago
Reply to  Bob p

Not AI, Bob p. Just HI (human inspiration). As Sandi mentioned I was referring to the wheel covers used to shade tires when the RV is parked. Sorry if it was confusing. Enjoy your day!

Carl W
7 days ago

Before hanging or attaching anything to a tree in a campground, one should be sure that the campground does not have specific rules about doing so. And also be aware that bungee cords are inherently dangerous in that when stretched, they are under a good amount of tension. There are cases where people have injured or destroyed their eyesight when they “lost control” of a bungee cord. Sort of like “You’ll shoot your eye out kid.”

Gail
7 days ago
Reply to  Carl W

Good points, Carl. Thanks for the reminder.

Bob p
7 days ago
Reply to  Carl W

That’s going to be one heck of a bungee cord to hang a hammock from it. Lol, especially one an adult could lay in. I’ve never seen a bungee cord 4”-5” in diameter. They don’t sell them at Walmart.

Tom
7 days ago
Reply to  Bob p

I guess as long as you just hang a hammock from the tree, just don’t lay in it. 🤔

Subscribe to our newsletter

Every Saturday and Sunday morning. Serving RVers for more than 20 years.