Forum

Advertisement




Inverter/converter
 
Notifications
Clear all

Question [Solved] Inverter/converter

 

 David Super
(@David Super)
Guest
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

I have a class B Coachmen. It is equipped with a WFCO 55amp converter, Xantrex Freedom xc pro 2000 inverter and Go Power 200w solar.

Related to batteries.  When plugged in, the inverter & converter is on and so is the 120v appliances. (Solar I leave on at all times). When I unplug, I shut off the inverter. All that is on in the coach is the frig (12v) and the solar.

Q: Is this ok to do? When driving my guess is that the vehicle motor charges the coach battery along with the vehicle battery. When parked, does the solar itself take over the charging without the use of the converter or inverter?

Since I have both converter and inverter, I'm guessing the converter (when plugged in) is 120v to 12v charging batteries and inverter is 12v to 120v appliances and receptacles


QuoteUnsolved
(@dave-solberg)
Moderator
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 132
 

David, 

In the setup you have described, you have basically three battery charging options. The WFCO converter, the Xantrex Inverter, and the GP Solar Panel. I would turn off the WFCO converter option as it will only provide a 13.6 volt charge to the battery/s until they reach 12.6 volts and then drop to a maintenance charge of 13.2 volts. You did not indicate what type of battery/s you have, however if they are Lithium, this will not charge the batteries to full charge as most require a 14.6 volt max charge so you will only get about 70% charge and efficiency.

The Xantrex Inverter/Charger has a programable battery charge option so you can set it to the type of battery/s you have. If they are lead acid, you will want to use the 3-stage charge that starts with a bulk charge to break up sulfation and then does a float and equalizing. There is also an AGM charging stage and if they are lithium battery/s use the custom setting that will provide the charge your battery is rated for. 

The GP 200w solar panel should have a charge controller that will also monitor the charge of the battery/s and can also be set for the type of battery. 

When you are plugged into 120-volt power, the Xantrex charger will provide charging power to the battery/s as needed and the charge controller on the solar panel system will sense the battery/s condition and not overcharge. When you unplug, the solar panels and charger become the only source of charging power and only when there is line of sight to the sun. 

And yes, when you are driving, the engine charging system will provide a charge to the house batteries and the solar panel system will take over once you shut off the engine. 

And finally, the inverter will also take 12-volt power and "invert" it to 120-volt power for outlets inside the rig so you can use appliances went not plugged into shoreline power.

I will do a little more research on how the inverter charger interacts with the solar panel charge system when plugged in. Always learning!

 


ReplyQuote
 Mark Stevens
(@Mark Stevens)
Guest
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 7
 

I would think that you would want to be very careful how long you run the 12v frig while unplugged and not running down the road.  200w of solar alone will probably not keep up with you frig and may result in a depleted house battery.


ReplyQuote
(@mike)
Moderator
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 94
 

David, 

Could this be a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma....? Actually, there are 4 possible charging options, which makes no sense. So before anyone can offer a safe and correct answer, we need more intel. 

  1. What type, chemistry, number and AH of batteries do you have... (Lithium, AGM or Flooded Cell?)
  2. Is there a dedicated MPPT solar charge controller you didn't mention? That seems to be missing from your description. 
  3. Is this a factory stock install, something you did yourself, or a DIY upgrade from a previous owner...? Seems like a lot of extra stuff if it's a factory build.
  4. Do you have any documentation on how this is all hooked up? For example, it's possible to have the output of an inverter power the converter which charges the battery, all in a loop that does nothing but discharge the house batteries.  
  5. Remember that all vehicle battery systems are inherently dangerous to work on due to the very high currents involved. In many ways 12-volt DC systems can be more dangerous than 120-volt AC systems. So be careful around any 12-volt wiring.  

Mike Sokol

This post was modified 5 months ago 4 times by Mike Sokol

ReplyQuote
 David Super
(@David Super)
Guest
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  
  • This is a factory install on a 2021 coachmen beyond class B on a Ford Transit chassis. 300 amp AGM battery. Don't know what MPPT stands for but the solar does have its own controller. I don't plan on messing with any of the electrical that involves the inverter or converter
 20210401 153100

ReplyQuote
(@mike)
Moderator
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 94
 

Actually, in my energy usage experiments with 12-volt compressor refrigerators (an 8 cu ft Vitrifrigo and 10 cu ft Dometic) they both would be sustainable with 300 watts of solar. I’m not sure what size/model 12-volt fridge is in his Class-B, but it’s certainly smaller than 8 cu ft. It’s possible that 200 watts of solar might be able to sustain it. But that’s something he would have to monitor. 


ReplyQuote
(@mike)
Moderator
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 94
 
Posted by: @David Super
  • This is a factory install on a 2021 coachmen beyond class B on a Ford Transit chassis. 300 amp AGM battery. Don't know what MPPT stands for but the solar does have its own controller. I don't plan on messing with any of the electrical that involves the inverter or converter
20210401 153100

I’ve contacted Coachman for a schematic of how your system is wired, but I’ve not heard back from them. I believe your plan of shutting off the inverter and leaving the solar charging on is okay to do. But you will want to monitor your battery charge daily if you leave the 12-volt refrigerator on. Remember that if you routinely discharge an AGM battery below 50% SoC (State of Charge) it’s service life will be drastically shortened. 


ReplyQuote

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

Maximum allowed file size is 10MB

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share:

Advertisement