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Breaking Not so fast, we don't see the crowds...

 

 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 13
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We are just a few weeks into our annual snowbird migration. We did the planning to get our preferred sites on the Gulf coast and on our trip south. So far in the migration we have experienced no, yes as in none, over crowding. We made no reservations for our first few travel nights as we never can tell what the weather will hand us. Yet we call a campground as we get close and find plenty of space and even under use. Our first destination with a couple of weeks reservation, less than half full on weekends and only a third full during the week. Our next stop, same story. As we talk with other campers they are having the same experience. One of them has been visiting some of the "hot spots" and experienced plenty of vacancy. Sitting here on the lake shore at a beautiful paved campsite we have no neighbors and none even in site. Maybe the crowding is more of a west coast trapped by the Rockies phenomenon. We will see as the winter progresses how  difficult it is to find a great place to camp.


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 Bonny A Knowlton
(@Bonny A Knowlton)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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I would like to know where a person can travel in the west during the winter months with no reservations.  I am currently in Goodyear and glad to have reserved early due to the crowds coming in from northern states.  I have one friend who had to move out of park to a county park because there isn't a space for her.  Even the county park could not accommodate her for an electric hookup site more than a couple of days.  She is currently in their dry camping area until a spot opens up.  I have been told by many campgrounds here in Arizona that they are full for the months of January thru April.  These spots are booked a year out.  I would love to camp where there aren't crowds, especially during this pandemic.


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 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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Hi Bonny,  don't know about the west. I would like to know that also if we ever decide to venture that direction but you make it sound like a bad idea. As I said in my post we are focused on the gulf coast being Louisiana and Texas. Right now we are in east central Texas at a C.O.E. that is way less than half full. Sitting at a spot on the lake (back of the coach got wet yesterday due to water spray from the wind). Our closest neighbor sabot 1/8 mile away. We are still in the migration from the north country but have not seen any of our stops over half full. Our last stop for 2 weeks was right on the Mississippi. It was rough sitting on our lawn watching riverboats and barges pass by all day as we enjoyed our favorite adult beverage. In another week we will be in Galveston Island. I will do an update on the crowding on the island. Keep safe and travel free and easy.... Mike


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 Nanci
(@Nanci)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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We are hosts in a county park outside Phoenix and it is full almost every night here. The dry camping spots are usually available until there is an event and then it is virtualy impossible to get in. Size matters- we host in AZ and MN. MN county park has 279 sites and still books up on the weekend. Our park in AZ only has 30 sites and is full.


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 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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Now into another week on the road moving south. Again we are in a campground that is near empty. We are at Sandy Creek a C.O.E. park in northeast Texas. We sit on a lake with literally no one with in site on our side of the lake. We went over to another park yesterday that had estimated 40 or so sites an 1 camper on the lake. I am beginning to think the Rocky's are the barrier between wide open camping and over crowding. We were informed a couple of days ago by one of the campgrounds that we have reservations at on the Gulf Coast (south Texas) that they had to cancel our reservation as they had not yet completed rebuilding throw the storm. I did a quick check to find another park and found most places I checked had plenty of openings. Yes some were full but they were in the minority.


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 Donna
(@Donna)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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My hubby and I travel all over and we've had difficulty getting a spot on the East Coast, including Florida.  We tend to boondock when we're in the southwest, but have been able to find sites when we want to go full hookup. 

State parks are usually a good bet, and we've had really nice stays in county and city parks.  Hipcamp.com has some good deals, too.


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 Kevinj C
(@Kevinj C)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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 To Mike J, who made it clear, those under 50 should not be able to obtain an RV.  Why?  Because you want it your way.  This isn't burger king pal.  I am currently 51 yrs old, however have owned RV's since my early 20's.  Raising two kids in the RV camping world, teaching them the inn's and out's of camping whether it be a tent or RV.  Teaching them respect for the land and camp grounds we were in.  Pack it in, pack it out.  Handing them trash bags at the end of our trip, cleaning our space and the spaces around us.  Camping at a young age my self with my parents showed me the ropes for my own kids.  If I waited until I was 50, I would have missed out on so many memories and fun with my family.  So yes, I guess the simple answer for you sir would be a senior park where you can sit and camp in isolation and quiet.  That sounds so fun, said nobody.  I would not trade the memories I have with my wife and kids for anything back in the days where the learned to ride bikes, fish, camp and live off the land.  Life lessons that could very well may be needed with the way the country is going.  I wish you luck in finding your quiet space.  As for the rest of you young whippers, rock on, enjoy the outdoors, teach your kids camping etiquette and the rest will take care of itself.  Happy Camping you all!!!  

Kevin C


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 Ivor
(@Ivor)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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Maybe because we don't seek the fancy "resort" type campgrounds, we have (so far) not had any trouble finding sites when we needed them.

We have just spent the last year traveling from Florida up to Oregon and back down to Georgia - spent time in a few grotty campgrounds, but mostly in some lovely "gems", none of which were nearly full.

What we have found though, prices have gone up enormously! Stayed in a dump in Vicksburg for $41 a night, and a wonderful little park in Marion for only $31


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 Bob
(@Bob)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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I decided late (Christmas) to come to Florida for winter. I have found sites at every campground I called, some just not on the first call. One place required I call back every morning, every afternoon late, until there was a cancellation, then BAM, about eighth call, I was in for three weeks! 
It’s not what you do, it’s how you do it. Almost everyone I talked to say you can’t do this in Florida in the winter. It’s tougher than other years, but still doable, no far advanced reservations, no upgrade memberships, no paying in full in advance. 


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 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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Topic starter  

That is great to hear. We quit doing the Florida trips due to the heavy crowds, might be time to try it again.


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 Ron H.
(@Ron H.)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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We came to Yuma from Seattle in January and stopped 7 times on the way.  Always called ahead to find available sites and never encountered a full RV park. Here in Yuma, our park is about 75% occupied.  Plenty of room for more snowbirds.


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 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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The end of month 2 on our snowbird trip south and no crowds. I now sit at yet another RV park at 1/3 full. When we arrived a few days ago it was not full. Now on the weekend I sit watching the waves roll onto the beach on the passenger side of our coach and barges being pushed up and down the inter-coastal waterway out the driver side windows. Sitting just north of Matagorda Bay we are two hours from Galveston Island (which was not crowded) in an area that has 2 restaurants, a Dollar General and one gas station so it is not a tourist mecca. Spring break is a few weeks away but the owner says they still have openings for campers. Our last park was full for those weeks but had room right after. I also talked with people that were heading to Florida last week. They said they had no problem getting a reservation. We will updates conditions as we move to new locations. Happy camping and safe travels.

 2022 02 24 0164

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 Tina
(@Tina)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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We have stayed in an RV Park in Sierra Vista, AZ for several months for the past five years. It has expanded during that time, but has rarely been full. The management is fabulous and there are several amenities to enjoy right in the park. On the annual trip to AZ from MN, we have never been told there was 'No room in the inn.' We are currently in Amite, LA, after leaving AZ, and the large park here is not half full. Are we just lucky or are others more particular about where they stay?


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(@nanci-dixon)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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We will be traveling back to Minnesota soon and hope we have as much luck as you are having!


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 Mike Whelan
(@Mike Whelan)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 13
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Starting to work our way back to the north country. Presently in east central Texas at a  C.O.E. campground. Great spot on the lake to watch the sunsets and fish right off our site. Park is less than half full. A few more locals arrived this afternoon and evening for the weekend but still plenty of room.


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