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Question Consequence of upping ST tire load rating/inflation level?

 

 Steven lazarus
(@Steven lazarus)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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My travel trailer uses factory installed C load rated tires with a 50 psi trailer manufacturer inflation. I worry that upping to a D rated tire with 65 pounds inflation will hurt my trailer with a rougher/ stiffer ride. My unloaded trailer weighs 2000 pounds. Any down side to staying with C load rating? 


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 Roger Marble
(@Roger Marble)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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You are correct that to gain load capacity you can't just go to the next higher Load Range tire, you also need to increase inflation.  You didn't say what size tire you have or what the loaded weight is. The unloaded weight just tells us it is relatively small. Let me guess that it's a single axle and has ST205/75R14 LR-C which has a load capacity of 1,760# per tire at 50 psi. If you went to a Load Range D and ran 10 psi more or 60 psi you would be gaining more than 10 % load capacity (1950#). Maybe it would be better to look at your current Reserve Load and see what you need to be sure you have at least 15% or 20% reserve load. If your current measured scale load on your axle is 3,165# you already have a 10% reserve. Going to the LR-D tire above and running 60 psi you would then have a 23% reserve load which IMO would be great. Yes the "ride" would be a little stiffer but  I don't think too much with the +10 psi of inflation. one other thing to consider is a TPMS with 6 sensors to monitor the 4 tires on your TV and the two on the trailer. Most OE TOMS do not give feedback until a tire is way low on air. If you were to program the TPMS as I do my system HERE, you would gain an important advance warning if you ever get a puncture. One other thing. Be sure to get the metal bolt-in valves (like TR416) on the trailer to be installed when you install the new tires.


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 Tony from TN
(@Tony from TN)
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Use your trailers weight rating and then inflate the tires to the level recommended by the tire manufacturer's charts for that load. Check their website or call their tech support to get that information. Overinflation or always just inflating to the MAX pressure on the sidewall can cause many problems, including poor traction, excess tread wear, or increased wear in the trailers suspension components. I am posting what I learned by contacting the tire manufacturer when I upgraded the tires on my camper.


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 Tony from TN
(@Tony from TN)
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Joined: 4 months ago
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Use your trailers weight rating and then inflate the tires to the level recommended by the tire manufacturer's charts for that load. Check their website or call their tech support to get that information. Overinflation or always just inflating to the MAX pressure on the sidewall can cause many problems, including poor traction, excess tread wear, or increased wear in the trailers suspension components. I am posting what I learned by contacting the tire manufacturer when I upgraded the tires on my camper.

 

If you are looking to significantly increase the amount of weight your trailer can carry you will need to also upgrade the suspension components.


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 Roger Marble
(@Roger Marble)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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Don't forget that the Load & Inflation charts tell us the MINIMUM inflation required to support the stated load.  I have tried to provide links to the various tables but with the exception of a few 22.5" Michelin, you will find that all the tire companies have the same load & inflation numbers for identical size and type tires. https://www.rvtiresafety.net/2015/04/links-to-load-inflation-tables.html


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