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Question Loads that shift during travel.

 

 Garrett Myers
(@Garrett Myers)
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I pull a 36' gooseneck LQ horse trailer, constantly tow up to three horses (1k to 1.5k lbs. per horse). My question is how should tire inflation be looked at when you are towing several thousand pounds of horse behind you? At any given moment 100's of pounds can be shifting all over the place. Should the the tires just be filled to the max pressure rating to accommodate any shifting load, plus reserve load?


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 Roger Marble
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I think we can ignore the LQ as you don't have people in the trailer when traveling.

Do you have scale weights with 6 1,500# horses loaded? Individual tire position weights are not needed but individual axle weights would help.

What are the numbers on the Certification sticker GAWR for each axle?

Tire size and Load Range too.

 

Without knowing more I would run at least the Certification Sticker inflation till we get more numbers.


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 Garrett Myers
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Good morning.

If I understand correctly, you want to know the weight of the trailer loaded with horses? I do not have weights to simulate loaded horses, but I can try and weigh the trailer with two horses in it tomorrow.

 

The GAWR is 3175 kg (7000 lbs) per axle. Their are two axles and the trailer recommends ST235/80R16 LRE at 80 psi.


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 Roger Marble
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OK your tire is rated 3,420# @ 80 psi Maximum load.  DOT Regs say the tires should be able to support the GAWR but you only have 6,840#.

I don't think that your horse trailer is covered by RVIA as it isn't an RV (unless the LO makes it one) BUT if it were then the tires should be rated to support 110% of GAWR.

I would think it would be a good practice, if possible to keep the tire loading under 6,156#.   I understand the difficulty of getting individual tire weights PLUS your situation with the "weight" moving around, The best we can do is to try and have as much Reserve Load as possible. I have a number of posts on my RVTireSafety.net blog on Reserve Load and you might read those posts.


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 Garrett Myers
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I am going to try and break the numbers out and see what your thoughts are.

One axle is rated for 7k lbs.

One wheel is rated 3750 lbs.

One tire for load E is rated 3420 lbs.

 

Per axles. 7k lbs for axle, 7.5k lbs for wheels and 6.84k lbs for tires.

That puts the weekest link on the tire. Is their a reason for that or would it be perfectly acceptable to go to a load G rated tire (4080 lbs/tire)? That puts the tire capacity well above everything else and also increases the speed rating.

 

Also for actual weights for the trailer. The trailer came in at 9680 lbs with two horses. Unfortunately their is not a scale that breaks out the trailer axle weights. It was a CAT Scale. If I add a 3rd horse add 1.5k lbs, which happens occasionally. The axles are towards the rear of the trailer and directly below the horses. 

 


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 Roger Marble
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Assuming your wheels are rated for 110 psi (LR-G) that might be an option to give you some Reserve Load in the tires. You still need to stay below the GAWR as there are other components (wheels, hubs, bearings, springs, shackles, bolts etc any one of which could be the next "weakest link" once you upgrade the tires.


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 Garrett Myers
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Agreed. I like the idea of the tires with a LR G over LR E and having that reserve load. My last question would be then, should I run the LR G tires at max PSI (110)?


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 Roger Marble
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You also have the option of LR-F.  Only you can decide how much you are willing to risk a tire failure and how much you are willing to spend to improve your odds.

I would do some shopping for LR-F and LR-G which would be "Commercial Truck tires" Since you may need wheels you could also consider 17.5" rims as I have seen them on some big 5th wheel RV and they provide increased load capacity over your 16" LR-E titres.


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 Garrett Myers
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The current 16" wheels are rated higher than the axle and I have found Carlisle makes a CSL 16 ST235/80R16 LR G. This is the tire size recommended for the trailer but G rated. Using this tire at 110 psi, means everything is rated above the axle and the GAWR for the trailer would be the max. I like those numbers. Only issue is with the higher numbers, should I run it at the max or use less psi to get closer to the GAWR?


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 Roger Marble
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using the tables for the LR-G tire I would look for inflation that gives a load capacity of at least 115% of GAWR.


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 Garrett Myers
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Awesome! Thank you so much for taking the time and effort for talking with me! I really do appreciate it. You have a great day!


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