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Question What are reliable tools for predicting an impending tire failure

 

 Pat Reedy
(@Pat Reedy)
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Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 3
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In your recent article titled; "RV Tire Safety: Is the temperature reading of your TPMS correct? Probably, BUT…", you state; "I started this post by saying I did not think that a TPMS or an IR gun were reliable tools for predicting an impending tire failure based on the reported temperature."  In the article you tell us why these two items were not a reliable tools for predicting an impending tire failure, but you didn't tell us tools for predicting an impending tire failure

Looking forward to learning from you what are reliable tools for predicting an impending tire failure.


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 Roger Marble
(@Roger Marble)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 54
 

I am not aware of any "tool" or device that can reliably "predict" a tire failure. However, if you have properly programmed your TPMS you can expect a tire to fail if you choose to ignore the low-pressure warning from the TPMS. However, a TPMS can not tell you the exact mileage before failure i.e. "The tire will fail in 5.3 miles" because there are too many other factors such as load and temperature, I would think that you might have 3 to 10 miles after the warning sounds, assuming highway speed and loads above 75% of the max load rating for the tire and the tire has NEVER been run under the level needed to support the actual load and the tire is not damaged from external cut or impact.

Belt separations are different and harder to predict as modern steel-belted radials can run for thousands of miles with small (1/4" range) internal cracks I.e. separations  IF  you never run more than 80% of max load or ever hit a pothole.

Now I am confident that you are not happy with my answer but the reality is that the infinite variations in Load, Speed, and operating temperature history present a history that is too complex for anyone to calculate tire life. Especially when you introduce the reality of the 100% failure rate between 5 and 8,000 miles found in the study I covered in this post.


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