More people downsizing, choosing to live in RVs

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    Getting rid of their “stuff” seems to be the motivating factor for how families are describing the seemingly more and more popular lifestyle of moving into an RV. San Antonio’s KSAT TV 12 toured one family’s new home and talked about the big change.

    “I got to thinking since we are downsizing, why not just get RVs?” asked Kevin Blakley. Blakley is now a retired member of the Air Force and has been living in an RV for about a year.


    Blakley says one of the main reasons for being an RV full-timer is the opportunity. “You’re mobile, so you’re not tied to one place and we see that as a big advantage we have some ideas of where we’d like to settle down, but this way we can actually visit and live there a while before making that decision,” Blakley said.

    “We have simplified, it is amazing how much stuff you accumulate over the years that you don’t really need and without a lot of that stuff life is just a little easier,” Blakley continued. “We have everything need, we don’t really feel cramped, so we are happy with it.”

    Kathy Chittenden, manager of Blazin Star Luxury RV Resort, said she had seen an uptick in the last 5-10 years and it’s not just retirees and people from the north trying to escape the cold.

    “The property taxes and just stuff and it seems like a lot of people are just tired of that,” Chittenden said.

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    Sandy Frankus

    Been in our RV full time for a year and a half. It was much easier for me to down size than hubby. Absolutely don’t miss the dusting , gardening, and constant cleaning. We’ ll hit the road full-time in late August. Both of us looking forward to a new life

    Captn John

    We bought a new 43′ Montana 5er last year knowing we would be using it less and less than previous units. Already we store it June, July, and August as CGs are overcrowded. In another 3 – 4 years we may not use it at all and will probably have to give it away. I foresee millions of almost new units on the market soon and many will be foreclosures! We can afford it but how many will be financially hit for years?
    We are also seeing more and more homesteaders at ‘fam camps’, campgrounds on military installations. Although against the rules in most, it still goes on and on.

    Liz

    Most of these glowing FTing vs sticks-n-bricks articles are from the male perspective. For the wives, most RVs put her back in mid-20th century: no washer/dryer, no dishwasher, limited electricity, poor baking oven, no room for ironing, mediocre noisy air-conditioning over your head all day and night (his hearing is less acute), no space for gardens, sewing, crafts, et al. Third World living with a high price tag and frequent expensive repair bills, poured into a flimsy, thin-walled, poorly insulated vehicle with rapid depreciation.
    People are waking up, seeing the overcrowded campgrounds, national parks, and trashed BLM lands, and the factors mentioned in first paragraph, and rejecting the RV marketing hype by choosing other options.

    Denny wagaman

    It’s fun to think of downsizing but then I would miss my home. After being gone for four or five months from Nov to or through April it’s great to stretch out in space plus do a little work in the yard. My wife misses the winter. But there was a time when We thought about an early retirement and wanted to FT. Glad we didn’t as RVing is coming to a close But have a twinkle in my eyes for those that pull the plug!

    Jim Besong

    Love the articles. The hepo advertisement in the left column is very annoying as it bounces back and forth while I’m trying to read.