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Beginner’s Guide to RVing Newsletter Volume 2, issue 121

rv travel logoWelcome to the Beginner’s Guide to RVing from RVtravel.com. The information we present here every Monday through Friday is for brand-new RVers – those in the market to buy their first RV and those who just purchased theirs. If you are an experienced RVer, this material may be too basic for you.

This newsletter is funded primarily through advertising and voluntary subscription contributions from our readers. Thanks to all of you!

Monday, October 18, 2021

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DID YOU MISS reading this morning’s RV Daily Tips Newsletter? Good stuff there.

Today’s Tips of the Day:
Secret storage? You have tons of it in your RV – just open that cabinet door! 
Ask Dave: What are the red specks in my water from the campground?

Today’s RV Review:
Ember RV Overland Micro Series


RVing Basics

How to drive safely down a steep hill

When going down steep hills, gravity will tend to speed you up. You must select an appropriate safe speed, use a low gear, and apply enough braking power to hold you back without letting the brakes get too hot. Use the braking effect of the engine (lower gears) as the principal way of controlling your speed to save your brakes so you will be able to slow or stop as required by road and traffic conditions. Slow the vehicle and shift the transmission to a low gear before starting down a grade. From California DMV. [Get much more info from Russ and Tiña De Maris here.]

Test the RV’s features for noise before you buy

While in the final process of buying an RV, be sure to test the rig’s water pump and furnace to see how noisy they are. On some inexpensive RVs, the water pump may be poorly insulated and make a horribly loud sound. The furnace fan may be noisy as well. Also check for the placement of electrical outlets. On some units their locations will make little sense and prove inconvenient once you are on the road.



Quick Tips

Secure the dump hose extension
Reader Mel Goddard has this tip on using a clear sewer fitting on the RV side of your dump hose: “On my Hi-Lo I use one of those clear sewer fittings. However, I found that it might come off easily when I’m trying to remove the dump hose instead. So I put a large hose clamp around the cogs where the extension attaches to the outlet pipe. This holds the extension on firmly for a permanent installation.” Thanks, Mel!

Don’t burn wet/damp wood in campfire
PennyPA reminds all of us campfire lovers of another good reason to burn only seasoned, dry wood. “Wet (even damp) wood makes lots of smoke, and as one who has emphysema, even though I love the smell of a campfire, it plays havoc with my breathing.” Thanks for the reminder, Penny!


“If you could tell someone new to RVing just one thing, what would it be?”

From the editors: We asked our readers this question. Here is one response: 

“Know your limit and buy within it. Budget every trip and stay within it. It helps to be handy with routine and preventive maintenance to avoid wasted time and money on repairs. But the best piece of advice I would give is to keep your expectations realistic. My wife and I have RVed for over a decade and thoroughly enjoy the travel, seeing new sites and meeting some wonderful people, but we understand that it’s not the ‘dreamy experience’ brought to you by RV dealers with scenes of beautiful isolated forests, mountains and deserts. Depending on your circumstances you can throw caution to the wind and see what’s available as you travel, but only if you have a teardrop, small travel trailer or small B class rig. If you don’t, trips will need to be planned and reservations will need to be made. Not everyone lives in or can travel to BLM areas of the country and RV parks can get expensive, so keep your expectations real or you could be disappointed.” —Bill T.


Glow-in-the-dark tape is brilliant for help at night
One of our readers recommended glow-in-the-dark tape to stick on things to see at night. We love this idea! Use this tape on light switches and slideout switches so they’re easy to see in the dark. The tape also works great to help find your door and lock at night, as well as your RV steps. Learn more or order here.


Random RV Thought

An RV always seems bigger when you are inside it than when you are outside it.


RESOURCES:
• If you buy a defective RV and are unable to get it fixed or its warranty honored, here is where to turn for help.

• If you need an RV Lemon Law Lawyer, Ron Burdge is your man.

Why you should never finance an RV for 20 years!



RVtravel.com Staff

Publisher: Chuck Woodbury. Editor: Emily Woodbury. Associate editor: Diane McGovern. Senior editors: Russ and Tiña De Maris. Senior writers: Nanci Dixon, Tony Barthel, Mike Gast. Contributors: Mike Sokol, Gail Marsh, Roger Marble, Dave Solberg, Dave Helgeson, Janet Groene, Julianne Crane, Chris Guld, Machelle James, James Raia, Kate Doherty, Randall Brink, J.R. Montigel, Clint Norrell, and Chris Epting. Podcast host and producer: Scott Linden. Special projects director: Jessica Sarvis. Moderators: Gary Gilmore, Linda Brady. Financial affairs director: Gail Meyring. IT wrangler: Kim Christiansen.

Honorary CorrespondentsLoyal readers who regularly email us leads about news stories and other information and resources that aid our own news-gathering efforts.
Tom and Lois Speirs • Mike Sherman • George Bliss • Steve Barnes • Tom Hart + others who we will add later. 

Everything in this newsletter is true to the best of our knowledge. But we occasionally get something wrong. We’re just human! So don’t go spending $10,000 on something we said was good simply because we said so, or fixing something according to what we suggested (check with your own technician first). Maybe we made a mistake. Tips and/or comments in this newsletter are those of the authors and may not reflect the views of RVtravel.com or this newsletter.

RVtravel.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Regardless of this potential revenue, unless stated otherwise, we only recommend products or services we believe provide value to our readers.

CONTACT US
Editorial (all but news)
: editor@rvtravel.com
Editorial (news)
: mikegast@rvtravel.com
Advertising
: Advertising@rvtravel.com
Help desk:
 Contact us.

Mail us at 9792 Edmonds Way, #265, Edmonds, WA 98020.

This newsletter is copyright 2021 by RV Travel LLC.

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Richard Hughes
1 month ago

Put two large dogs and two people in an RV and it is always too small, no matter what it looks like on the outside.

Last edited 1 month ago by Richard Hughes
Bill N Stacey
11 months ago

Its the Other Way Around For Us!!

Tom
11 months ago
Reply to  Bill N Stacey

Agree, when outside it seems huge, especially when washing time comes.

Dr. Mike
1 month ago
Reply to  Bill N Stacey

I agree. Our coach fills a 50 x 15 x 16-foot storage unit so much that just opening the door is a challenge.
If you really want to know just how large she really is- wash it, by hand- with a spray bottle and a microfiber cloth.

doug
11 months ago

A TARDIS! –> An RV always seems bigger when you are inside it than when you are outside it.