Beginner’s Guide to RVing Newsletter #2

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Welcome to the Beginner’s Guide to RVing from RVtravel.com. The information we present here every Monday through Friday is for new RVers – those in the market to buy their first RV and those who just purchased theirs. If you are an experienced RVer, this material may be too basic for you.

This newsletter is funded primarily through advertising and voluntary subscription contributions from our readers. Thanks to all of you!

If you shop at Amazon, please visit through our affiliate site (we get a little commission that way – and you don’t pay any extra). Thank you!

July 8, 2020

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DID YOU MISS reading this morning’s RV Daily Tips Newsletter? Good stuff there.


 Stay free at more than 1,040 wineries and farms
Stay overnight for free at more than 1,040 wineries, farms, breweries, etc.! Harvest Hosts is an alternative to traditional campgrounds, where members can taste great wines and micro-brews, eat fresh produce and stay in peaceful settings. Save 15 percent on a membership by using code HHFRIENDS15 at checkoutLearn more


RVing BASICS

What’s the difference between a campground and an RV park?
Public facilities like those found on government lands are almost always called campgrounds. Privately owned campgrounds are usually called RV parks, but not always. RV parks that cater to luxury RVs are often called RV resorts, although the term is often used by less-than-luxurious parks to spiff up their image.

Is an RV protected from being hit by lightning?
It can be, but not always. While you, yourself, will probably survive a direct lightning hit while sitting inside of a metal (aluminum) RV, fiberglass and canvas RVs don’t offer this type of protection. And a direct lightning strike on your RV will probably blow out all of the electrical systems. Even a nearby lightning ground strike can travel up your shore power cord, blow up your surge protector or EMS, and destroy your RV’s internal wiring. It’s best practice to unplug you RV from pedestal power and seek shelter in a large building during severe electrical storms. Learn more about RV electricity by signing up for Mike Sokol’s monthly RV Electricity Newsletter.

Should I wear gloves while dumping the holding tanks?
When we surveyed RVers on this question, about three-quarters reported that they did, indeed, wear gloves while dumping, which you should do. If not and you have an open cut on your hand, if bacteria should enter it you could end up in a bad way. Disposable gloves are best. Please don’t leave your “used” gloves lying around at the dump station — throw them away in an appropriate trash can or take them with you for disposal. 


Do you have a blog you’d like RVtravel.com to host?
If we accept you, you’ll earn money from the first day you post. Tip: No blogs about “we went here and did this.” Good writing important. Submit your blog idea.


QUICK TIPS

Correct RV tire pressure saves tires
Keeping RV tires at the right inflation saves them. Too much pressure — uneven tread wear. Too little pressure — risk ruining the tires from overheating, plus uneven wear. Tires give off air even without actual “leaks,” so check them before you start out on a trip, and at least weekly on the road.

Make sure your sealant is sealing
Check sealants around windows, doors and roof vents often. Sealant does “dry out,” and cracked sealant can lead not only to air leaks (making it harder to heat and cool your rig) but, worse, can allow water in that can lead to expensive damage.

Handy bedside water glass holder
Space tight in the bedroom? No room for a water glass? Your local auto parts store has a great selection of folding cup holders that can screw onto a nearby wall or bulkhead.

Hint for safer parking
Ever find you need to park the rig with part of it “sticking out” in traffic, either on a street or in a parking lot? Pick up a set of “sport cones” from Walmart. A little shorter than standard traffic cones, they still stick out like sore thumbs, are inexpensive, and can be easily stored near the driver (or navigator) seat. Great for marking an “occupied” campsite, too.

Use big enough leveling blocks
Got leveling blocks for under the tires? Make sure the blocks are big enough that the tire sits completely on the block — not overhanging it. Dually rig owners, BOTH the tires must be supported, not just “one or ‘tuther.”

We welcome your Quick Tips: Send to editor@rvtravel.com


Don’t buy a portable generator 
Use your car’s engine instead. Save money. Save hassle. Learn more at cargenerator.com.


RESOURCES:
• If you’re a member of Facebook, be sure to sign up for our groups RV Buying Advice, RV Advice and Budget RV Travel. For a list of all our groups and RVtravel.com newsletters, visit here.

• If you buy a defective RV and are unable to get it fixed or its warranty honored, here is a where  to turn for help.

• If you need an RV Lemon Law Lawyer, Ron Burdge is your man.

Why you should never finance an RV for 20 years!


☀ Be cool this summer. Now use your RV air conditioner when you could never use it before. No kidding!


Read previous issues of Beginner’s Guide to RVing newsletters here.


RV Travel staff

CONTACT US at editor@RVtravel.com

Publisher: Chuck Woodbury. Editors: Emily Woodbury, Diane McGovern.

Everything in this newsletter is true to the best of our knowledge. But we occasionally get something wrong. We’re just human! So don’t go spending $10,000 on something we said was good simply because we said so, or fixing something according to what we suggested (check with your own technician first). Maybe we made a mistake. Tips and/or comments in this newsletter are those of the authors and may not reflect the views of RVtravel.com or this newsletter.

RVtravel.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Regardless of this potential revenue, unless stated otherwise, we only recommend products or services we believe provide value to our readers.

Mail us at 9792 Edmonds Way, #265, Edmonds, WA 98020.

This newsletter is copyright 2020 by RVtravel.com.

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28 Comments
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Brian Jensen
2 months ago

One thing every new Rver should know is that you should get on your roof every 6 months or less and carefully look for leaks. These temporary homes do not have the permanence of brick and stick homes

C Bonelli
2 months ago

Two for two! Another useful hint (folding cup holders – but I will be using it as a mobile phone holder in my “bedroom” and good refresher information. Found the Car Generator fascinating… will research for sure.

Bobkat
2 months ago
Reply to  C Bonelli

3M Command Strips makes little plastic bins in several sizes. They attach to the wall with the removable strips. No holes in your wall! We have two on each side for glasses, phones, ear plugs, etc.

Lauren Baker
2 months ago
Reply to  C Bonelli

I keep my engine keys beside my bed, the panic button/alarm is very loud at night if needed. (I have never had to use it myself)

Terry Treman
2 months ago

Me, again. Please consider putting links to past issues of this series in the issues.

C Bonelli
2 months ago
Reply to  Terry Treman
Admin
RV Staff (@rvstaff)
2 months ago
Reply to  Terry Treman

Good idea, Terry. Done! Thanks! 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

Terry Treman
2 months ago

Is there a way, like a donation, to see these ad free?

Dean
2 months ago

Robbie, maybe you missed the the header of this new article provided to us for free?
Beginner’s Guide to RVing Newsletter #2

tom B
2 months ago

wearing gloves when dumping tanks? did you wear gloves when changing a baby’s diaper? be careful, and remember it’s a closed system, dump black first, rinse the tank, dump grey, and after unhooking, rinse the hoses well.

take everything one step at a time, double check, and you’ll be fine!

David Kendall
2 months ago
Reply to  tom B

Yes, wear gloves and mask for changing diapers. 😊

Terry Treman
2 months ago
Reply to  tom B

Cleaning up after changing a baby is far more convenient.

Joe
2 months ago
Reply to  tom B

Pull gray tank first for short period to check for leaks and then close. Pull black tank until empty and then close and rinse with gray water.

Ward Cook
2 months ago

Good info.😀

Robbie
2 months ago

Don’t buy a portable generator 
Use your car’s engine instead. Save money. Save hassle. 

This is the kind of information you give beginners? Dumb!

Fritz
2 months ago
Reply to  Robbie

I hope you get banned.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
2 months ago
Reply to  Fritz

Fritz, me thinks Robbie has big ol’ chip on his shoulder. I hope he just leaves this website and never returns. — Chuck/editor

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
2 months ago
Reply to  Robbie

And why is it dumb, Robbie? It’s a superb and very innovative product. I would appreciate you explaining what you mean by “dumb.” How about you go through all the 650 newsletters we publish a year, and let me know what else is dumb so we can be sure we don’t say anything to offend you again.

Judy S
2 months ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

OMG Chuck, please dont give rude posters any attention! That’s what they seek. Many other sites simply remove and ban such people and I’ll bet many readers would applaud you.

Mike Albert
2 months ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

As a new RVer, I appreciate any and all information given or suggested. I’m able to make my decisions to agree that something is needed or warranted to use/buy or not. Not only THIS publication but the weekly newsletters and the Sunday letters have helped in our Loooooong search (over three years) for an RV and ultimate purchase of an RV. I just wished that Gary’s tidbits were searchable. Heck, Chuck, Emily, Diane and Gail could make a search page (if that’s what you call it) on their spare time. HAHA!
Again, thanks for all you do! Keep up the good work!

Last edited 2 months ago by Mike Albert
Admin
RV Staff (@rvstaff)
2 months ago
Reply to  Mike Albert

Thanks for your generous comments, Mike! And to find Gary’s always great information, you can go to our homepage at https://www.rvtravel.com/ and search for the RV Doctor or Gary Bunzer and it will list hundreds of Gary’s articles. Or search for a topic and some of his articles will be listed. Happy RVing! 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

Lester R Hollins
2 months ago
Reply to  Mike Albert

I have put the cart before the horse a few times to many through out life. Finding this site helps tremendously in my search for the RV that suits my needs.
Thanks everyone for sharing.

Jerry
2 months ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

Chuck, please take another closer look at the car generator. It’s a $40 inverter for $460. For an additional $400 they put a plastic cover around it and call it weather proof. The ad is great in the realm of lipstick on a pig, but as your mission here is to advise newbies … your advice in this case should be, “Don’t be fooled!”

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
2 months ago
Reply to  Jerry

I disagree with you, Jerry. I don’t know how long you have been RVing, but I can tell you in my 40 years of it, I have never in all those years heard of anyone with a product that does what this does. I believe this is a superb product that will be useful to many people.

Jerry
2 months ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

I was wrong, Chuck. You inspired me to take another look myself at the car generator. It’s a pure sine inverter, so it’s not a $40 inverter, it’s a $120 inverter for $460 or $795 if you want the plastic cover. You wondered how long I’ve been RVing … about 60 years. Oh, and I built an inverter as part of my high school science fair project … so I’ll be happy to explain more about this if you like. You can defend your new advertiser all you want. I’ve trusted your advice for years and learned much from your newsletters. I’m your fan and admirer. If I saw that ad in your regular newsletter … let the buyer beware, but this is for newbies. Protect them as best you can. There’s a lot of them these days and they deserve our best advice for spending their money.

Irv
2 months ago

Sport cones tend to blow away in the wind.

Terry Treman
2 months ago
Reply to  Irv

What would you suggest, Irv?

brian
2 months ago
Reply to  Irv

You could fill them with concrete, discourages theft too! 🙂