Tuesday, October 19, 2021

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Do you try to minimize your purchase and/or use of plastic?

More than 5 trillion pieces of plastic are floating in our oceans right now, and thousands more are being added every second, especially with the single-use nature the pandemic has caused. By the year 2050, it is said that every seabird will be eating plastic. Plastic is already found in the bellies of almost every seabird today.

On a daily basis, do you try to minimize your purchase and/or use of plastic? Is it something you think about or not at all?

Please tell us in the poll below. If you have eliminated plastic (or tried to as best as you can), tell us what you use as alternatives in the comments. Thanks!

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Grant Graves
5 months ago

We’ve been traveling through Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Nebraska for a number of days and only 1 RV park had a recycling option. So, I guess it is not very important to lots of folks to recycle and cut plastic use. I was very discouraged when I read that recycling for the US is about 32%. It appears to me that overall the U.S. does not take recycling seriously.

Roy Davis
5 months ago

My wife and I have been very environmentally conscious for decades. I haven’t bought bottled water and have our own bags for groceries and such. If we forget our bags we will ask for paper. When we arrive at a new location, one of the first things we look for is recycling containers. Our calling in life is to be caretakers of God’s creation not destroyers.

Dr4Film
5 months ago

Look at the amount of FOAM aka Styrofoam containers that are used everyday in this country versus paper or even plastic. Styrofoam never decomposes ever unlike plastic which does decompose eventually. The only way to dispose of foam containers is to incinerate them at a very high temperature. Facts on Styrofoam – Reduce and Reuse web site link

https://www.colliercountyfl.gov/your-government/divisions-s-z/solid-hazardous-waste-management/keeping-green-helpful-information-page/the-facts-on-styrofoam-reduce-and-reuse

Neal Davis
5 months ago

We never buy bottled water. We do have a few bottles that we have been given over the years that we refill and carry with us when the need arises. We drink from the tap at home and from the refrigerator dispenser when traveling in the RV (our RV water is filtered 3 times if we drink it and twice otherwise).

I do shred the plastic that holds my soft drink bottles, but I don’t go to the point of buying cans instead of bottles. My wife strongly prefers her soft drinks in a can, so she is far more environmentally friendly.

Skip
5 months ago

I make sure plastic bottles/jugs/jars are rinsed and ready for recycle and some I use jugs over as in cooking oil that has to be disposed of separate from household. I wish they would ban Styrofoam. I hate the stuff and it can’t be recycled. Was glad to see Dunkin did away with their cups.

Jeff Craig
5 months ago

I am very cognizant of what I use, and recycle everything I can. That said, companies cater to a society raised on ‘throw away convenience’. I use my own Contigo coffee cup, a pair of Contigo water bottles during my work day, so I am not buying coffee or sodas. I am back to using my own bags when I go to the grocery, and try to restrict my driving to essential trips – running errands on my way to/from work so I’m not putting a bunch of unneeded carbon into the air. I also use TerraPass to buy carbon offsets for our big trips in the RV.

This world is our childrens inheritance – we need to take good care of it and not ‘pass the buck’.

Skip
5 months ago
Reply to  Jeff Craig

It is our children and grand children’s inheritance but it’s them tossing the McDonald’s bag out the window or Dunkins coffee cup. I followed a couple of kids tossing trash out the window. I stopped and picked it up, jumping back into the truck to the local convenience store, got out of the truck with their trash, walked up to their car and tossed it in and told them don’t do it again. Whether it did any good I don’t know. They were stunned, but I sure felt better.

Tom
5 months ago

The way it is with the ‘woke’ world, I don’t care what I leave behind. I’ve been recycling since the 70’s, not I feel why bother: the young will just screw the world up enough.

Brenda Grady
5 months ago

I try not to buy anything that is not recyclable, but when I do, I always try to put it to another beneficial use. As an example, the large containers of apple juice I buy for smoothies are square with a nice size, pour spout; take up less space than round bottles; and, have a grooved grip area for secure handling. I use them to store dry beans, flours, sugars, etc. Also, use them in refrigerator for filtered drinking water and iced sun tea. I always use large, reusable shopping bags at grocery, but acquire a small amount of plastic bags during impromptu stops in drugstore, etc. I keep these stored inside empty, decorative, square facial tissue boxes and place in kitchen, bath, and storage area to use as trash receptacles and another box near TT entry door for muddy shoe storage and/or quick access to pick up some unknown dog poop (just stick hand inside bag, pick up poop, fold bag over your hand, knot and toss into trash).

KellyR
5 months ago

Don’t get me started on how stupid we are. Plastic bags to “save the trees” – there is only so much oil to make plastic. We grow trees to make paper – just like we grow corn or wheat to eat. Food and paper are all farmed renewable products. Misguided “tree huggers” did not know what they were talking about. Glass bottles can be recycled/reused – AND we will probably run out of oil before we run out of sand. The recycle number on the bottom of a bottle says it is recyclable by the plastic manufacturer, BUT it is my understanding that we do not have the facilities to actually recycle some plastics, so they somehow go somewhere and somehow get into the oceans. I recycle metal and paper but put our plastic in the trash so it does not get into our oceans. One day we will dig up our landfills and find the plastic and turn it back into oil. Plastic may, a thousand years from now, be the new oil. Who knows? Sorry, I got started.

Tommy Molnar
5 months ago
Reply to  KellyR

Why would we dig up our landfills?

Tom
5 months ago

We use a Brita filter for water we consume and cook with, take reusable bags to stores, and containers when we go out to eat for any leftovers. When shopping we don’t buy produce in plastic wrap.

Nancy Smith
5 months ago

We have milk delivered in glass bottles which we return rinsed out. Other than that, it’s very difficult to avoid plastic. We recycle everything we can. We drop off recyclables whenever we see receptacles, but usually take them home with us where our town has a robust recycling program.

Lil John
5 months ago

To me, as I have said before, the manufacturers are responsible for being eco safe. They used to put things in glass containers, then buy the containers back, clean and reuse them. Coke is a good example. They had bottling plants all over America. Now, even when they use glass, it is just thrown in a dump. What a waste! Don’t hold your breath that things will change. Americans are the most spoiled people on earth, and most really don’t care one way or another. I hope you folks are not that way. Good RVing!

DW/ND
5 months ago

By the way – we also recycle plastic bags, as our grocery store has collection bins for them. They take all sources of bags – not just theirs. I don’t know what they do with them – I presume make more bags ?

DW/ND
5 months ago

We don’t deliberately try to avoid plastic as it is everywhere from the item used to the packaging. It is pretty much unavoidable. However, we do recycle plastic, cans, cardboard, glass and newspapers – and it is a pain as our rural Waste Management Co. does not pick it up; we haul it to the city recycling bins which is 26 miles round trip – altho we combine it with grocery trips etc. When in the motor home we bring it home if the park doesn’t have recycle bins.

Diane Mc
5 months ago

My choice is missing. We don’t really pay attention, but we do recycle, so we are thinking about it in that sense.

Tommy Molnar
5 months ago

We can blame Dustin Hoffman for all this . . . Or at least his neighbor.

Last edited 5 months ago by Tommy Molnar
John
5 months ago

The answer is high temperature incineration of all trash. Then removing the steel, copper and aluminum which are easily recycled here in the US. The remaining ash is about 10% of the initial volume and can be landfilled safely. The energy from burning all the plastic and paper can be used to generate electricity. This isn’t a pipe dream. It’s being done Now in a few places in the US and Europe. What keeps it from happening here is that people don’t want it in their back yard. Drive the turnpike in south Florida and you will see at least 2.

BadWolfe
5 months ago
Reply to  John

Exactly! I’ve seen a few “startup” companies in the past that were focused on this exact market (burning trash, producing energy and recycling). None in the U.S. have expanded the way I thought they would. To me, it seems like an easy solution, but there must be some fundamental issue with the business model somewhere. Maybe the cost is higher than just dumping?

John
5 months ago
Reply to  BadWolfe

The really huge reason is permitting. Anything going into the air from a smoke stack takes years and millions of dollars to permit. Only the government agency charged with waste disposal can afford the costs. For them, it saves a lot of money in landfill costs and recycling. The last Florida county I lived in wanted to do it, because otherwise they would have to expand the landfill or find a place for a new one. County commissioners bowed to the uninformed people who didn’t want it in their county for fear of bringing in outside waste, even though it was tremendously less expensive.

Brenda Grady
5 months ago
Reply to  John

I live in deep South Florida….what are the approximate locations of the two sites you mention viewing from the TPK?

Bob
5 months ago

Our trash hauler still accepts recyclable plastic according to the number on the plastic container .Plastics showing from 1 to 6 are recyclable. They did stop taking plastic bags though. We were told that the bags cannot be recycled because it is not known what plastic is used to make them.
We also keep reusable bags in our vehicles to eliminate the store bags.

Gary
5 months ago
Reply to  Bob

“6” is not recyclable. “7” is. 1 through 7 except 6.

Gary G
5 months ago

We purchased the Berkey filter system for water, didn’t delete plastic bottles but sure cut down on quantity bought. It seems like everything is packaged in plastic or styrofoam these days. America needs to do it’s own recycling, not ship it anywhere. We created the junk we fix the mess to something better.

LESLIE SCHOFIELD
5 months ago

When at home we use a company called Ridwell. It takes the ‘soft’ plastic, ie wraps around paper towels, bags, etc and gives it to local businesses who then turn the plastic into products to sell. We do not use plastic milk jugs or water bottles. We try very hard to use as little plastic as possible.