When was the last time you weighed your RV?

10

Your RV must be weighed when it is fully loaded. This includes passengers, food, clothing, water, fuel, supplies, any towed vehicles behind a motorhome, and the tow vehicle for an RV trailer. It is important to weigh your RV at a location that can provide axle-end specific weights. You should not expect to measure equal loads at both ends of the same axle, because floor plans and component locations vary significantly; however, you should distribute the load to obtain the best balance possible.

When was the last time you weighed your RV?


Why should you have your RV weighed?

Courtesy of The RV Technical Education and Safety Conference

    • To know if your RV exceeds the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) or Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) assigned by the manufacturer. Exceeding these ratings can cause premature wear and tear on the vehicle’s components. The RV may have failures or need repairs due to excessive weight, although the weight factor may not be clearly evident. In the worst case, an overweight situation creates safety hazards.
    • To know if your motorhome and towed vehicle or your trailer and tow vehicle exceed the Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) assigned to your motorized vehicle (the motorhome, or the tow vehicle in the case of a trailer). Exceeding the GCWR can have legal and safety consequences.
    • To know if you need special licensing for the state in which your vehicle is registered.
    • To know if your RV tires are overloaded.
    • To know if your RV tires have the proper inflation pressure for the loads on the tires.

Learn more about wheel positioning weighing.

10
Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
JON Scott

If the vehicle was configured at the normal OCCC for the way you use it. Why would you weight it more then once ? Which asking “When was the last time you weight your RV” ? Implies it should be weighted frequently !

Tommy Molnar

I’ve used state scales for years (especially when going through Oregon) but I finally went to the local Maverick station near home and used their truck scale – when there were no trucks around. I was able to take the time to actually unhook the trailer and get a weight on the tongue alone. Whew, we’re not overweight there. We’re actually ok on all points. Truck GVW, trailer weight within mfg specs, and axle weights. I didn’t do an individual wheel weight. That would take forever, and cost a bunch in re-weighs. I’m satisfied that we’re fine.

Vanessa Simmons

Weighed twice about three weeks apart. Overweight first time. Jettisoned stuff at my sisters house and was 1000 pounds heavier at second weigh in. Now I have no idea how much I weigh. First was Escapees in AZ at permanent scales second was FMCA rally in GA by portable scales. Maybe the second just wrote the numbers wrong and nothing was wrong with their scales.

ThreeQuarterTon

I’ve weighed our rig twice in the last year and a half. Problem is we recently got rid of the motor home and bought a 5ver! Hope to hit a scale soon. Have always wondered about “closed scales”, will try them asap. Thanks for the tip!

Gene Bjerke

I don’t have my records with me (I’m on the road) but I suspect it has been two or three years. Our loading is pretty much standardized and our weight doesn’t change much. Don’t expect to weigh again very soon.

Ron V

It has been a while since I weighed my 5th wheel. When I did, I was having tire issues. I weighed on CAT scales and had individual wheel weight at a Rally. All 1000# under max GVWR. I finally bought new rims and went from a Load Range E ST tire to a Load Range G Goodyear G614 LT tire and not one problem since. I should have put LT tires on to begin with when the original LT tires wore our but it is a trailer, I thought. Little did I know. VERY happy with the G614’s.
And yes every one should be weighing their rigs fully loaded. I have a friend that lost their rig even after everyone in our camping group told them to weigh it.

richard ackroyd

Like Ray, I too was astounded that almost half of all the RV’ers didn’t know the true weight of their outfit !
We are full time traveller for six month each year in the RV so I alternate between one year I get weighed on a CAT scale and the next year I get a 4 corner weight at an Escapee’s rally.
Maybe your survey shows why we see so many RV’s with shredded tires at the side of the road?

Richard.

David Hagen

In some states, like mine, truck scales are on, even the sign says closed. If the LED display is on 0000 then just drive in and stop on the scale, first front axle then rear axle. But only if the scales are closed. The state workers get pissed if RVs stop when the scale is open.

Ray Leissner

This is a pet peeve of mine. I responded to the survey and was shocked to see 50% never have weighed their rig. I can’t think of a single more important safety factor for towing, tires or stopping. Weight says it all. It sets the rules. How does one know if they are approaching limits to their rig’s capacities to handle the weight without knowing the various loads their tires, brakes, axles and drive train are exposed to? For a few bucks you can get the weight on each axle of your rig at any Cat scale in minutes and the total weight as well. I recommend you weigh when fully loaded.

This may become an even bigger safety issue in the future. If you look at the yellow capacity stickers of the 5th wheels, with large storage capacities coming off the line, many axle capacities can easily be exceeded. Just because you have room to store something doesn’t mean you should.