If you were in the market right now to buy a new model RV, would you go ahead or postpone for awhile?

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If you have been seriously thinking of buying a new RV soon, would you go ahead with a purchase or wait awhile to see what happens with the uncertain economy?

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bounder
6 months ago

Wait until the dealers start dropping prices which should be soon. Possibly a flood of private sales too.

Bill
6 months ago

We have been planning to buy a new trailer in May, and have been given a fixed price that is very attractive. If we had pulled the needed cash out of our investments when the Dow was at 29,000 or so, we would have eagerly gone ahead as planned. But the 30% decline in value of our investments means that the price of the RV has essentially gone up 30%. Not so attractive now, so we will wait until we see if the market recovers, at least part way.

Steve S
6 months ago
Reply to  Bill

Hi Bill, I’m in the same boat as you, except, instead of a new RV, I had a reservation for a Chevy Bolt EV, to be paid for via my profits from my portfolio. Since the stocks lost so much value, I thought it prudent to hang on to my stocks and wait for them to recover (which will happen). I can wait. It would be no different attitude for a RV.

Bull
6 months ago

Gonna be some SMOKIN deals in the next several weeks/months as those who live beyond their means (Most Families) have to SELL their Toys and other items to try and pay their bills.

As always “Cash Is King”!

Time to start looking for those bargain items you wish to purchase.

Ellen Lane
6 months ago

We have a contract and closing date for our sticks and bricks. Have a deposit on a unit and are going ahead with our full time RV plans.

Bob Schilling
6 months ago

Right now I’m waiting for a class A RV manufacturer to make a rig that is as thoroughly quality controlled and tested and as a quality car is. I’ll stick with my current rig until that happens. I’m done paying hundreds of thousands of dollars for a rig with poor design, components that are miswired or misinstalled, and crappy quality for anything installed behind the walls or out of sight.

In my opinion, the first company that figures this out and puts a really well built unit out there for a fair price will own the market for years until the rest get on the bandwagon.

Steve S
6 months ago
Reply to  Bob Schilling

Hi Bob, the industry already figured it out. That’s why it’s the way it is! People keep buying cr@p.

ron in sunny Fla.
6 months ago

Think a 2 to 3 year old model with the factory faults worked out would be a better choice both for cost and dependability

Bob
5 months ago

Always a better choice. Low miles, slightly used, will usually net a deal around 50% off original retail with a unit you can actually use. I’ve had too many friends buy new, only to discover the dealer has their new rig longer in the first year than they had it. You decide.

Chris W
6 months ago

I would hold off since destination activities have been canceled or postponed, and industry pricing will need some adjustment to retire the economy. I would be willing to wait to see if that occurs.

Chris W
6 months ago
Reply to  Chris W

It should have read ‘ to retire the economy’.

Steve Fleury
6 months ago

We have 6 year old 29 foot Winnebago travel trailer. We had a roof leak and it needed to be replaced. Rather than the economy, it was the poor quality in the RV industry that convinced us to replace it. Combined with the poor service, we figured it was best to have a trailer we liked and trusted rather than one that seemed destined to have issues and months of warranty repairs.

bounder
6 months ago

I’d likely go ahead with a purchase, especially if dealers start dropping.

Goldie
6 months ago

Our DP is only 2 years old this month, so we are not in the market. But if we were, I’d probably hold off just to let the market recover a bit. We’re okay with normal cash flow but would rather be purchasing off of gains, not converting paper losses to real.

Sam Sprott
6 months ago

Our nest egg is in the market and hard silver. With both of them currently depressed, it would take a higher percentage of either to cover the cost of a newer RV. We would also obviously have a lower asset level to enjoy the future rebound. For now, we’re happy with what we’ve got. 🙂

Joni Weed
6 months ago

We actually are in the market for a new rv in the coming few months. We definitely must now hold off as there is too much uncertainty in the market. All hinges upon selling a sticks and bricks, changing residence. These things may not be in the realm of reality for the next several months. I am a retired community health nurse. I saw this coming in the last month, including what it might mean. So we must content ourselves with maintaining the current rv and keeping our plans on hold.

Robbie
6 months ago

With the market falling, prices have to be coming down on RV’s soon, think we’ll wait.

Alvin
6 months ago
Reply to  Robbie

More important Robbie, than “prices coming down” is finding something where the quality went up. Good luck on that, and consider the later when buying anything today especially a home on wheels, you’ll be miles ahead over the coming years holding quality up as a prime consideration.

Steve S.
6 months ago

We bought our current travel trailer 7 years ago, and were planning on buying something new and a bit bigger within the next year or so. In another article the author stated “Buyers might want to do some homework on the quality differences between manufacturers.“. They are absolutely correct. I have been doing research, and there are several manufacturers who under no circumstances would I buy from. Since these 3 manufacturers control about 65% of the brands on the market, it is a good initial filter. Of the remaining, most of the anecdotal comments I can find are about 50/50 between people who state “I love it, no problems” and those who state “I hate it, will never buy one again”. So, where does that leave me? It would be great if there was some way to ‘try before I buy’. If only I could rent the unit for a long weekend and see how it goes. I’d rather spend a couple hundred bucks up front to discover a lemon, than have to spend a lot more (including the inability to camp) after the fact. However, my understanding is that if they rent a unit, they can no longer sell it as new. So either way, its a crapshoot (literally, based on some of the stories I’ve read).

Alvin
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve S.

Steve I should have read your comment before commenting on Robbie above, you basically say the same thing, and I agree with you 100%.

David
6 months ago

We are seriously in the RV market but between CV and it being an election year we have decided to wait until the end of 2020. So much can change by then we think our patience will pay off in more ways than one.

RV Quality Control has also been an issue for me for years. Perhaps with slower sales the manufacturers can work on QC. It has been really poor.

Walt
6 months ago

In our RV Club, our members have everything from a $25,000 Travel Trailer to a $250,000 Motorhome. One member bought a 12 year old Winnebago a few years ago and has only had to spend a few Thousand to keep it running good. While another member just purchased a New Allegro Bus last fall and it has been in the shop more than it has been on the road. At least it is under Warranty. Go figure? For my wife & I, we’re sticking with my 3 year old Lance, we got all the bugs worked out.

TravelingMan
6 months ago
Reply to  Walt

3 years is about how long it takes to work out the bugs in all of the units. The sad part is that most parts have a life expectancy of 5 years or less so don’t expect that you won’t have more problems. You’re just getting a break at the moment.

Alvin
6 months ago
Reply to  Walt

One of the biggest factors I’ve found with RV’s falling apart prematurely is knowing that people think they can take these flimsy things repeatedly down back country roads more suitable for a jeep and they will stay together, systems wouldn’t fail and they’ll continue to keep the elements outside (they won’t leak, etc)!

Most of the crap foisted on us today is built with an obsolescence factor built in, and until consumers en mass protest with their wallets and/or governments step in to mandate better, and we keep buying bad, don’t expect anything to change.

Many manufacturers of consumables today operate on the age old saying “there’s a sucker born every second” – and they’re right!

Nanci
6 months ago

As the market falls so will car, trailer and motorhome prices. We bought our first Class A in 2008 for an incredible price. Now looking for a new tow car but will wait until costs recede. Unfortunately my 401K is receding faster than the car prices…

Alvin
6 months ago
Reply to  Nanci

Nancy don’t spend too much on a toad. We bought a 2011 Chevy HHR two years ago with 25,000 miles on it (they run trouble free for ten times that number – with care) I outfitted it to tow behind our little motor home, and it is the best dam thing you could imagine. I don’t have ten grand in it. Best of all I could sell it in a heartbeat for at least all I have invested in it. You can’t say that about much in the world of automotive’s today.

Maybe you’re one who couldn’t be caught dead in an old vehicle, if so I’m no help to ya, but if you want a toad, with tons of panache, room to spare, great mileage, and with parts & service readily available and a sweet little rig that’ll keep you smiling and give you change every time you drive it – I don’t think there’s anything out there in the price range that’ll beat it.

HHR is acronym for Heritage High Roof.

Ron
6 months ago

Would not buy a new one until the manufacturers address QUALITY.

TravelingMan
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron

Without legitimate and meaningful legislation (remember we are talking about the folks who might write a law that have never owned one and will listen to the manufacture lobbyists who know what’s best for you), that means you are out of the market for the long term. I would never buy a new model ever. Buy one that is about three years old. You’ll save a ton of money and most of the bugs are worked out by the original owner. They are selling because they are tired of the headaches and storage fees. Just make sure you have done a QUALITY PDI. If you don’t know what that is, hire someone to do it for you. You will be glad you did.

Bob
5 months ago
Reply to  Ron

My father was an RV dealer for many years. In the factories I toured in my youth, there was a greater emphasis on the image of quality, rather than building better with upgraded materials to insure quality. You must remember, billionaires own these companies and their focus is always making the “most” money off your your decision, not what they provide to you.

Donald N Wright
6 months ago

After watching the fire video, I would buy a fire protection system.

tom
6 months ago

This is a good time to sit on the sidelines and watch. The virus will drive prices down, as dealers and manufacturers can eat inventory costs for only so long. This may also kill off weaker dealers, living close on the margin.
I was intending to ‘look’ at new RV at FMCA in Tucson, but this can wait.

TPalmer
6 months ago
Reply to  tom

Agree. Sit tight, prices will take a drop. Then make your move.

Becky Johnstone
6 months ago
Reply to  tom

I’ve been looking to upgrade but am sitting tight for now. Stocked up on supplies. Delaying plans to leave the desert. It’s been cool and wet so far this month. We were planning to hit the Oregon and Washington coast. We’ll watch the flowers bloom here and see what April brings. We’re 65 and 80. He’s high risk. No reason for added exposure. Wearing gloves at the gas pump.

TravelingMan
6 months ago
Reply to  tom

As the dealer prices drop, so will used rigs. Keep that in mind and find an even better deal than a new one.

With the record sales that manufacturers had over the last few years, there will soon be a glut of models to choose from (either from storage fees, coronavirus or having to work all the time).