Monday, July 26, 2021
Monday, July 26, 2021

Do you have a “go-to” RV shop or technician who you trust for repairs?

Heaven knows, a big problem for many RVers today is where to go for repairs. There is a huge shortage of RV technicians. The RV industry is addressing it, but it will be a long time — if ever, considering the half-million new RVs being sold every year — before it will be as easy to get an RV worked on as a car.

In many cases, just getting an appointment for repairs can take months. And then, who knows when the actual work can begin, or be completed?

If we’re lucky, we have a “go-to” repair shop (it could be the dealer where we bought our RV) or technician who we know can fit us in and do the job right. Many RVers report they rely on mobile technicians who actually come to their home or RV to do the work.

How about you? What’s your experience? Please leave a comment.

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Donn
3 months ago

Nope, I do not have anyone but myself. What I’ve discovered over many years is that they all charge way too much and its mostly a rip off.

Michael Roach
3 months ago
Reply to  Donn

Same here, I do it all myself, the few times I have had any work done I ended up having to redo it anyway because of poor workmanship.

Mary Redlus
3 months ago

Stephens Truck Center in Lyons Georgia solved our mystery smoking problem in our motorhome. Another center in Macon had installed the wrong part and insisted it was another undetected problem. We felt Stephens Truck Center went to the next step to find and correct problem. Great company to work with and highly recommended.

Skip
3 months ago

Repairs on house repairs self. Mechanical is my son in law. CW down the road 15 miles for get it. I seem to find they are all expensive and the workmanship seems to be bandaids fixes.

Tom Horn
3 months ago

Did not know that one existed, oh sorry yes I do, Me, Myself and I

Admin
RV Staff (@rvstaff)
3 months ago
Reply to  Tom Horn

Hi, Tom. That sounds like three, not just one. 😉 (I’m getting tired and silly.) Have a good night. 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

Neal Davis
3 months ago

I voted for technician, but I also have a shop that I trust. The local Freightliner dealer has a technician dedicated to RVs. He also is certified to work on Cummins engines and generators. So, I take our RV to him for annual service on the chassis, engine, and generator. For other work, I take our RV to the manufacturer (REV/American Coach) OR to a local dealer (not Camping World) that has a service company (Northgate Parts) and a sales company (Choo Choo RV). Both work with our extended warranty company (Coach Net). Certainly the manufacturer tends to get repairs done more quickly, but the proximity of the local people works well for us, too!

LEW ANDERSON
3 months ago

I have almost all of my service work done at the Lance Factory Service Center in Lancaster, CA. Even though I live in Yuma, AZ (300 miles away), I trust the service technicians at the factory to do any work I need.

If I’m at home in Yuma the only RV service I trust and rely on is CJ’s RV Repair & Service in the Foothills. They are very reasonably priced and knowledgeable in their work!

Lee
3 months ago

We are full time and always use Tiffin Factory Service or local techs in Red Bay. They know Tiffin products, have the parts on hand and do a good job. My dealer experiences have all been bad so I avoid them unless I get desperate. Freightliner or Cummins for chassis or engine work.

Gordy B
3 months ago

Ogden Automotive in Bonaire, Georgia. Greg Ogden is the man if you need a diesel pickup repaired. I don’t know if he can work on MHs, as space is at a premium. Reasonable rates and supreme knowledge of diesel. I drove from Michigan for repairs… including all costs (motel, fuel, rental car and repairs) I still saved money over local dealer.

Rich
3 months ago

Barrington Motor Sales RV Center in Bartlett IL. the techs, especially Bau, are teriffic.

Richard
3 months ago

In 15yrs of FTing I haven’t found a Tech that knew as much as I do about RVs. They don’t get trained, or paid enough, and they/the shop have an “Attitude” leaning toward dishonesty. I fix everything at all possible myself. The exception being chassis work, to which I have found a local truck shop I trust.

Christine
3 months ago

My boyfriend can do a fair amount of repair work. If it’s beyond his capabilities, we call a mobile repair tech (we’re full timers). Maybe once a year we head for the Tiffin factory in Red Bay, AL.

Rick
3 months ago

Depending upon the type of repair your talking about. You talking about “house” repairs or “ engine/ chassis repairs. I personally try to do my own repairs on both but sometimes you just need someone with not only the right experience but the right tools to get er done right!

Julz H
3 months ago

There was no option for DIY in the poll. My husband & I do all our repairs and maintenance. We rarely turn to repair shops for any of our vehicles including our trailer.

Joe White
3 months ago

I do 99% of any needed repairs/maintenance myself.

Drew
3 months ago
Reply to  Joe White

Me too but slide repairs were difficult for a few of the places where we took our rig. Hard to believe but they all had a different opinion of what was wrong. I ended up driving to the Junction City, Ore. factory service center. They did an excellent job. Sadly, Winnebago decided to close that facility a year ago.

Bob Weinfurt
3 months ago

There was no choice for me in the poll.
With one exception, I’ve been able to do all the repairs and maintenance on my 44 year old class C. Several years ago I was about 800 miles from home when a problem in the rear differential developed. A truck repair shop repaired it the same day. Back then they were simple, well made, and easier to work on.

George
3 months ago

No. Im sure Im in the minority. In the 5 years we’ve owned our motorhome (bought used), I have done all maintenance and mods myself. The benefit of learning to repair/build/install/modify anything at an early age and keep developing that knowledge is priceless. The downside/curse is you have a large garage full of tools and saved hardware and spare parts, and an always waiting list of undone projects. We just bought a 2021 diesel motorhome and im debating paying for the first major service……or learning some more!

Thom
3 months ago

I have someone I trust. Myself.
ASE Certified Medium/Heavy Truck Technician since certification became a thing. Been flipping wrenches for 40 years.
We retired last August and became snowbirds. Our reason for not full-timing is so we can be home this summer and do maintenance and projects on the coach. And grow a few veggies.

steve
3 months ago

Don’t trust anyone but myself to work on any of my “stuff”.

Dick & Sandy from near Buffalo, NY now in Florida
3 months ago

We did not vote because there are not enough options for our situation. When we are home there is an RV shop with techs that we trust and have taken all of the Class A coaches we have owned there for small issues up to collision (not our doing while we were parked) and paint work. ALSO because we winter in Florida for months at a time, we also have an RV dealership in Florida with certain techs that we trust.to work on our coaches over the years. Stay Safe, Stay Well, Safe Travels and Happy Easter.

Cheryl DeNoi
3 months ago

As full-timers for 14 years we have established trusted techs/shops across the country in addition to our resources in CA, where we used to live ages ago.

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