RV Life in a Coronavirus World: “Mr. President, please open our campgrounds!”

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EDITOR’S NOTE: We have asked RVtravel.com readers to tell us how they are adapting to life these days. Here is one story:

“Luckily, we made it home before all the madness. I heard about this on FNC in December, and whenever I was on the PC, I checked all over for any updates. We left Yuma, AZ, on January 2nd and left Tucson mid-January. We headed to TX, first near San Antonio area for two weeks, then (at that time WX) I felt the need to be home, but we had reservations in Conroe, TX, so went there.

“And then the news got, not worse exactly, but more alarming. We cut our visit short (WX again, flooding all across LA, MS, AL) and we did not want to get stuck because of either the virus or weather. Made it home mid-February. Again, the news just made it worse long before alerts or orders like ‘stay in place.’

“We made sure we had six months’ worth of essentials, which we normally do anyway, and we got more cash, in case banks closed, went to credit card use only, as I can clean it easily (who knows about money). Needless to say, our United States and the world one month later does not look anything like they did one month ago.

“I have written to the President asking him to make sure campgrounds are open since they meet the ‘distancing requirements,’ [and] they can close bathrooms since you’ve got one in your rig.

“Above all, think personal safety and all-around safety; fires, traffic, other vehicles is most important. If possible, help a trucker – they are on the front lines now along with all the medical folks.

“Wow, what 3 months does to the world!”

Montgomery Bonner


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22 Comments
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zonie
3 months ago

I think if you will research, you will find that it isn’t the POTUS who is keeping the campgrounds closed, (those that are closed) you will find that it is being controlled totally on a state level. It’s the governor of the state, who says why and when, campgrounds reopen….

Ted Denman
5 months ago

I’ll make this statement short. The President did not close Campgrounds!!!!!

Tim.kyfl
5 months ago

I do not understand the worry over “I’m glad I didn’t sell the house “. My RV is my house, I live in it very similar to living in a house, and have for almost four years.

I am hunkered down 7 miles out of the rat race and feel it is one of the best locations for the current crisis. Neighbors are 30 feet away, have lots of room to walk without a lot of people. No apt/condo where everyone touches the entry doors, railings, elevator buttons or door knobs. Just fresh air

There is reason for concern, however, no reason to “freak out”. Follow directions and take care of yourself and those in your family.

David Allen
5 months ago

At least the OP is not one of those that failed to take notice, abide by shelter in place, and find a place to sit it out. So many posting that they had a right to do what they wanted and now complain that they are being affected. Listen to the guidelines. Get to a place (there are many) and stay put. Add to that the idiots that insist they can drive across the US because they are self contained and refuse to abide by shelter in place requests. So many at their home base and still insisting on weekend get aways by rationalizing they can do so safely. Add to that the thousands of idiots that are flooding parks and congregating in huge groups despite the campground closures and you begin to see why the campgrounds are being closed. In my wintertime park in Florida, we left early but they closed facilities. People still there are still complaining because they are being inconvenienced. They still have huge get togethers outside their RV’s and so many just don’t get it. As long as the government does not make decisions, people will not do what they should.

Roger
5 months ago

We’re in our mid-60s so we’re in a high risk group. We had seriously considered selling the house and doing 5 years or so of full timing. So very thankful now for my procrastination problem! We drove back home from a month in Florida early just as the news was getting serious in early March. We’re here in a safe place with good access to all the essentials as well as our excellent medical support system we’ve used for the past 25 years. I will NEVER be without a home base now. Was just lucky this time.

WEB
5 months ago
Reply to  Roger

The only bad thing is next time the zombies will know where you live…. 😵

Sharon B
5 months ago

I was slowly getting my house ready to sell making it pristine perfect and just got diverted. Glad I got off tract and did not sell the house or I would be in a pickle. My camper is in the back yard, my house is comfortable and I have plenty of back up food from rice, soups, flour for making bread, filtered water so I don’t buy plastic bottled water, and other essentials. The more I watch the world situation the more I am concerned. So thankful I have a roof over my head that I can permanently stay in if I want. So I do feel lucky I’m in my house. If I want to camp I will take my dog, go out though the sliding glass doors and spend the night in my camper in my back yard.
I can’t imagine trying to find a campsite and being turned away. And with many state borders placing quarantine times I do not relish that thought.

Ray Leissner
5 months ago

Why is it that some people think the President controls everything? I’m sure the writer knows that he doesn’t and that states have more say about inside-the-state travel and the businesses making it possible than the federal government. The wording of the title I believe was to appeal emotionally to one almighty power, as if he owns the key to all. Asking 50 governors just doesn’t have the same appeal since they cannot make it go away individually. Do you think a Presidential order to re-open all federally controlled parks would be productive or counter-productive to the isolation efforts of the 50 governors who are also trying to protect their citizens within their state?

I too had to turn around. Luckily I have a home and got home 24 hours before a county issued stay-at-home order became effective. I feel sorry for RVers who cannot go “home”. I recognize that this quickly-disappearing musical chairs game is a dilemma. I hope you find a safe solution in these trying times.

Woody Woodrich
5 months ago
Reply to  Ray Leissner

These are FEDERAL parks in question. Local authorities cannot open or close federal parks.

Ted Denman
5 months ago
Reply to  Woody Woodrich

I question who has the power to close anything.

Will
5 months ago

All good points, but my local store is not accepting cash any longer because of the virus. Credit card only. Interesting times these be.

Marty chambers
5 months ago

You ever try boondocking?

I hear RVs are good for that.

Pat
5 months ago
Reply to  Marty chambers

OK if you’re in the west and can find federal land that hasn’t been closed. It’s a different story in the east. As a full timer currently in the southeast, I am finding the few forests with dispersed camping closed. .

Edward Wullschleger
5 months ago
Reply to  Marty chambers

How long can someone boondock before they run out of water and food? How long before they have to dump their tanks?

Roger
5 months ago
Reply to  Marty chambers

Ever tried it during a worldwide pandemic? A lot of my fulltime campervan friends were doing just that out west where they thought they’d be fine – especially on BLM land. Now that’s closing too. It’s always been more difficult here in the east, unless you consider Flying J and Walmart boondocking. Even those are getting shut down in the midst of the pandemic panic by well meaning, but scared communities.

THOMAS HUGHES
5 months ago

im in an rv park and when my reservation is up i have to leave. if i refuse to leave, dont they have to go to court before they can force me out. also i believe it is against the law to cut off my water and electric

Dennis F
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

Don’t we have enough problems, just pack your bags and don’t put the people at the R.V park under any more stress . They have their own problems,Ease on down the road and grow up you sound like a two year old, try being a growen up.

Gman
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

No, they just have to call the police and force you out. Really, court? You have an RV, as Dennis F stated, “grow up”, make like the wind and blow, LOL!

Tommy Molnar
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

I think “going to court” only applies to evicting people from houses and apartments. RV parks? Just leave when they tell you to. Avoid unwanted and unnecessary problems.

Chuck B
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

The RV Park has enough problems, so they don’t need to deal with your tantrums. Respect their property and THEIR rights. Get out.

MrDisaster
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

In most jurisdictions there is a difference between a short-term rental and long-term. Usually if less than 30 days you are in a short-term rental. The difference is generally no court ordered eviction is necessary. Just the Sheriff as you are trespassing. It’s fine to stand your ground, but understand all the rules. There could be long term ramifications to your action for the RV community. The loss of another RV park because the owners don’t want to deal with this kind of problem. Higher rates for all for the cost of fighting the issue. Increased community animosity toward the RV community. I suspect none of that concerns you at all.

Cheryl Bacon
5 months ago
Reply to  THOMAS HUGHES

An RV is considered a vehicle, not a home. A campground is not the same as a housing community. In other words, different rules, you would be considered trespassing among other things they can charge you with.