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Robin Canfield
3 years ago

So sad to read about the conditions in RV plants we plan to purchase a 20 footer this next winter at an RV show , now we will make sure we don’t purchase anything made in Indiana. We will gladly pay more for a Lance to get the quality they offer. It’s a shame Forrest River gobbled up some of the best makers and cheepened the product line.

Ron Schmitz
3 years ago

Diane
I have a 2016 Fleetwood Bounder with 2 slides. When it rains water comes in at the floor level with slides out. Put slides in and no water. Fleetwood says might have to put slides in everytime it rains. Before this RV I had a Flagstaff TT with 2 slides, and always keep them out in rain and no problems. Is this common for a motor home or am I just getting run around from Fleetwood. One year warrenty almost up.

Lee Ensminger
3 years ago
Reply to  Ron Schmitz

That’s baloney. You should be able to have your slides out in the rain. Keep after them and don’t let them slide past the end of the warranty!

RV Doc
3 years ago
Reply to  RV Staff

Hi Ron, Gary Bunzer here, Diane and Lee are correct, it should not leak with the slide extended. There are two sets of seals on each slideout to prevent moisture from entering whether the slide is in or out. Multiple room adjustments are also provided and need to be checked, along with the proper orientation of the room within the opening in the sidewall. Unless the sidewall itself is drastically warped somehow, or the slideout room not square or plumb, a certified RV service tech should be able to adjust the room positioning to keep rain water from entering.

EgWilly
3 years ago

The RV manufacturing industry would be better served by upgrading their processes and assembly lines, like the auto industry does.
I see shoddy workmanship all the time in RV’s, including things that final inspection should find and resolve.
Just passing the issues down to the dealer and buyer is not acceptable.
Make it right the first time!

JRW
3 years ago

WoW!! No AC in a plant! I worked piecework in a fabricating plant that not only had no AC but no heat in the winter either. What it did have was a mist of yellow oil in the air from the cutoff machines. Then a straight hourly position in the mill. AC around the blast furnaces making steel? From a different generation so just moved on or did the job with no whine.

benny
3 years ago
Reply to  JRW

I agree with you about the ac. I worked in the fields putting in tobacco chopping cotton etc. as a kid in n. c. when the temp. would reach 100 degrees. then went to Chicago as most of us southern boys did to get a job. I worked in a break shoe factory as a shipping clerk with no ac. and was about 10 feet from the ovens that bonded the linen to the shoes, very hot. We all worked like that in the fortys and fiftys not just me. plus the hot machinery thru out the plant . so stiffing up and be thankful you have a job.

Tommy Molnar
3 years ago
Reply to  JRW

l think some of us ‘older’ folks came from a truly different generation. None of the jobs I first got out of high school had a/c. These were all the factory jobs that have since gone (I guess) to China (where I’m sure THEY don’t have a/c either). I worked freight line loading docks that had snow blowing across the floor during the winter and sweltering temps in the summer (in Chicago). I didn’t see (or feel…) a/c until I went otr trucking – ha.

My early jobs didn’t have a/c, not because they hated the employees, but because it probably would have been impossible TO a/c that huge space – at least with 1960’s technology.

Onwego
3 years ago
Reply to  JRW

When I was a kid, I walked 2 miles to elementary school, uphill both ways, in buckle-on galoshes and a thin nylon coat in a foot of snow, year round.. Shot squirrels on the way home for the dinner pot, then sat down after supper, homework , and firing up the coal boiler to the 3-channel, black and white Phillips with the rabbit ears to watch Jackie Gleason reruns with my parents. Why, in my day…

Phil Hetzendorfer
3 years ago

I just have to pass this on to other class A owners with a larger than life size windshields.
In trying to keep the inside clean and free from smearing and fog with many different windex and glass cleaning products, I found glass polish wax made by gel gloss that is 100% smear proof. its about 6.50 a bottle through amazon. IT WORKS. I have no affiliation to this company what so ever and just wanted to pass on something that is good for others and works

John Hiler
3 years ago

Got to love that cheap junk turned out as RV’s equals huge profits for the companies who exploit their workers for more money.
And, best of all, Making Amerika Great Again… sort of touches your heart.

Grandmotherbear
3 years ago

I’m looking at the FB response to the Roadtrek site sharing your podcast thinking about designating some campground areas campfire free. I am ashamed to be part of any group these people belong to. The main responses are very insulting to camper owners with any sort of physical issues. They tell us to go stay in a hotel, we should not be In campers, and also that offering some campfire free areas of campgrounds is an infringement on their personal liberty. Don’t think I will ever respond to a camping thread on FB again.

Captn John
3 years ago

The campfire group can be understanding but seems most are not as I have followed those posts.
I have outgrown the need to haul or purchase wood for a smoky fire that has a chance of restarting while unattended. How about those sparks?
No wood fires is fine with me. I like my propane fire pit that does everything a wood fire does except smoke and send sparks flying.

Buzzelectric
3 years ago
Reply to  Captn John

I like your idea of a propane fireplace. I have tried a pre made fire log called Clean Flame. It is made of 100% recycled grocery produce boxes. Each log burns for about 3 hours, has very little smoke, and when it’s done burning it seems to be out.

Eric Swenson
3 years ago

Thank you for the insightful articles. Just finished reading about Thor and how production works at their factories. Now I know !

John Snell
3 years ago

Chuck properly used the term “churn” in his article re: manufacturing employment. Here’s a fun fact for you today; 75,000 people unintentially lose their jobs every day nationally. Of course the vast majority find other jobs, “churn”. Working conditions can mean more than pay. Constant turnover costs money.

Daniel Landry
3 years ago

Hello,

I’m looking for the best RV lender out there, or a few please. I’m a new buyer and buying used and I don’t know where to begin.

Thanks,
Dan Landry

don
3 years ago
Reply to  Daniel Landry

Get an older top quality coach: such as a country coach, beaver, or a prevost if you are richer.
They are quality and will last for years. I just sold my ’96 country coach that still looks and runs great.
Shop, test drive and learn something about your choice from other rvers.

Bluebird Bob
3 years ago
Reply to  don

Or find an older Bluebird Wanderlodge. You won’t go wrong with that choice.

Joe Allen
3 years ago

Chuck, I loved the “Newsletter done” article at the end of your blog. If you love what you do, in the end, that is all that matters. I have read your articles, watch your “youtube” videos and even commented from time to time on certain aspects of discussions from other viewers. We full timed for 6 years and loved it. We are back in a stick home now and have a Class C to use for occasional trips and even took it to Alaska last year. Your articles on the RV industry are spot on. It’s all about production and quality and fit is thrown out the door in most cases. For most, the higher end RV’s are out of the question, but the quality control is there for the most part. One reason we purchased a used Class A when we did the full time route. Foretravel, Newell and Prevost come to mind for top end RV’s, but buying used just makes sense. Might be a great article in an upcoming segment.
Happy 4th and God Bless America!

Mike Sherman
3 years ago
Reply to  Joe Allen

Well said Joe. Chuck has been providing a valuable service for years now. I have learned a lot. And you are correct, it makes good sense to buy used….many manufacturing defects have been addressed (hopefully), and one can save a ton of money.

Buzzelectric
3 years ago

This message is for our lovely recipe lady. Cauliflower? Curry? Yuck! Meat and potatoes with a “normal vegetable” and maybe some fruit. Please.

Steve Willey
3 years ago
Reply to  Buzzelectric

But the cauliflower curry is healthier and vegetarian, both worthy considerations.

Buzzelectric
3 years ago
Reply to  RV Staff

However it seems that she rarely has anything I would eat. And I’m sure others would agree.

Wolfe
3 years ago
Reply to  RV Staff

Although I agree with buzzelectric’s tastes, I don’t read RVtravel for its recipes anyway, and agree even more with Dianne about “to each their own.” Besides, all the veggie-heads leave more 40oz Prime Rib and loaded potato for us! Play nice kiddies!

Buzzelectric
3 years ago
Reply to  RV Staff

My suggestion was meant to stimulate more receipes in the area of food that I would consider.

DC
3 years ago
Reply to  Buzzelectric

We saw this recipe this morning and decided to try it this evening. We did try it. It’s pretty tasty. We’ll likely have it again. We had it as the main dish but it would work really well as a side dish too. Our family eats a lot of vegetarian meals for health reasons. We really appreciate recipes like this one. We’d actually like to see more of them.