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Mike Olson
1 year ago

Which is correct, tire pressure on sticker on camper or on tire? New tires, only difference is they are now radials

Ford Marshall
1 year ago

The other day I met up with an Australian couple from Queensland in a rented van camper (B class ) stating the poor quality and their until. They were curious about our PleasureWay 2005 Excel TS. Once they stepped inside they right away noticed the quality workmanship and the better layout. Yes it’s a few years old and well travelled and solid as a rock! Now days PleasureWay is known for it’s outstanding quality built. They walk the talk.

John Hiler
1 year ago

Coming from a site that continually belittles RV manufactures, parks, campgrounds, National Parks, and etc, Play nice, well, OK…

Mimi
1 year ago
Reply to  RV Staff

John’s correct, you criticize, but call it “fact”, yet when others make similar comments this publication tells them to “play nice”. Be careful about your biases and double standard. And remember, “open-mindedness” often leads to one’s brains falling out.

Alvin
1 year ago
Reply to  RV Staff

AMEN Diane. there’s nowhere near enough protest of these crimes plundering the public wallet if you ask me.

Fred Kelley
1 year ago

Be civil with your comments,

Thank you Chuck..

Andrew
1 year ago

When in doubt, throttle out.

Drew
1 year ago

Boy, I found the radial tire video one of the most interesting I’ve seen in a while! Thanks Roger.

Alvin
1 year ago

While there may be some consensus on what to do in the event of a tire blow out,(on any vehicle) I’d seriously challenge, anyone instructing a person finding themselves in this situation to “press the accelerator for a short distance”. Like many cures and fixes in this life, this may be one of a number of ways to bring this vehicle under control. But there are so many different situations one could find themselves in during a blowout, to pick one way of dealing with it, is dangerous in itself.

For many many years I have called out for driver training for anyone driving big rigs. This would help alleviate many of the concerns attached to handling differing situations while driving these these. It has been and remains totally absurd that the rules (or lack of them) allow a person with Zero training to go down to a dealer buy a 45ft rig attach the Cadillac SUV and hit the road, – WITH ZERO TRAINING – or license beyond what it takes to legally drive the g]family Honda.

Lets get real and start down the road demanding licensing and proper training to handle big rigs, and that goes for tightening rules surrounding tourists from other continents coming here and renting these behemoths and hitting the road. Nobody ever asks them a question about their experience driving in our country or if they’ve ever seen a RV before. So dangerous!!

Lets start a discussion about safety that lead to prevention of more more catastrophes on the road.

George
1 year ago
Reply to  Alvin

I respect your opinion Alvin and agree with the ‘one’ solution for everything theory, yet that is what you may be doing with your opinion on licensing and training RV operators. Rarely is anything so simple that ‘one’ solution fixes all. Frankly anytime the government takes control, it turns in to another tax source.

Alvin
1 year ago
Reply to  George

George I agree. I’m Canadian where the government either controls or seeks to control pretty well everything in our lives – a Socialism sweeping into American faster than a prairie wild fire.

The alternate though is to have no or very limited controls on things affecting the general population and deal with the carnage after the 45 footer lands on its roof in the ditch, and the ambulances carts the dead and wounded away. For me the solution to a better way isn’t that tough a choice.

Another example of the insanity prevailing, is at any age in my province a person must have in hand a special class of license, (which to acquire requires special training – a driver/rider examination and a written test) just to ride a scooter over 50 cc. There’s nothing required by law here but a simple class five (basic) license to run a 45 foot motorhome or a 700 hp Mustang or Camaro, all possible on the day of your 16th birthday.

I’m about as repulsed as anyone, (particularly folks my age) at government interference/ controls, BUT, there’s some things the peoples representatives should for the betterment of the general population get involved in. Why they don’t is a mystery.

I formulate many of my opinions on this matter from two sources. One a lifetime in the collision repair industry and secondly as a published automotive writer/researcher of 30 plus years. What I haven’t been party to first hand, heard or written extensively about I have no desire to explore.

www.livingboondockingmexico.blogspot.com
1 year ago
Reply to  Alvin

Or better yet, something in between the two extremes.

Nancy
1 year ago

Archie even looks like an “Archie” so sweet!

Ardy Mattox
1 year ago
Reply to  Nancy

Just precious! kinda like my wee Ceci chihuahua

Mike Mayberry
1 year ago

I’ m Sorry I could not read this week’s issue in its entirety. Every time I opened an article, a window popped up about subscribing. This window was positioned so I could not “x” it off. I had to go around the world to eliminate it. I finally gave up on the whole issue.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Mayberry

Mike, that should not happen, but I know we have had some problems on occasion. How are you reading the newsletter — on your phone, computer? Please, if you read this, let me know what you can and that might help us find the problem.

Sherry
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Mayberry

Don’t give up! I’m a regular reader, and never have a problem with its display. The membership window comes up only once. Please give the staff the information they need to diagnose your problem. They want to help you.

Scooter
1 year ago

Is that flat tire maneuver for just the front tire or all tires? It feels like with a blowout on any of my 5er trailer tires or the rear on my SRW truck, romping on the gas would be a bad idea.

Troy
1 year ago
Reply to  Scooter

I’m pretty sure it’s just for front tires on motorhomes.

Scooter
1 year ago
Reply to  Troy

Never specifies. Just says RVs. I agree with the assumption but we all know the rule of “assume”.

what, me worry?”
1 year ago

“what, me

Susan Fucci
1 year ago

I don’t agree with the “RV Quick TIP” regarding paying a dealer to do a PDI. Why should I have to pay if it is a new rig? I understand that manufacturer quality control is often poor at best (we have purchased new 3 times and had issues with each) and the need for an inspection is a must, but the dealer shouldn’t charge for that. We don’t pay when we buy other vehicles, etc. That said, the PDI that a dealer does will cover the spectrum in terms of thoroughness and corrective action. The best advice (IMHO) is to be as educated as you can before even stepping on a lot to purchase. Based on our buying experiences, you have to do your own PDI, which is why a through shakedown of any rig is a must.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan Fucci

Susan, the manufacturer should do the PDI before it leaves the factory. I can’t think of any other product sold today where the manufacturer can build something and then send it to a retailer knowing that a certain percentage of the products will have defects, even serious ones. This is why RVtravel.com keeps harping on quality, and the creation of RV lemon laws. If nobody challenges the manufacturers to do a better job, they will keep sending out crap. Some dealers will do a full PDI and be sure things are fixed before selling it. Others will not, and too bad if you buy from them.

Troy
1 year ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

MHSRV in Alvarado, Tx is one of those dealerships that really takes care of you. First off no one works on commission so there is no pressure at all. Then once you do buy they let you stay in a covered space on their lot in their service area for as long as it takes for you and your assigned technician to find and fix any issues. When we bought our motorhome we stayed three nights using everything to make sure it was all good to go! I don’t know why all dealerships don’t use this amazing business model to do business. I highly recommend everyone check them out!

Alvin
1 year ago
Reply to  Troy

Good on that Texas firm Troy. this still does not address the oft horrible product a manufacturer places in the market place requiring you to camp close at hand with a technician on call making “sure it was all good to go”

In my model that vehicle would have been properly built with pride, PDI’ed then delivered safe and sound for you to take on the road with confidence the minute you handed them the money and drove away.

Sherry
1 year ago
Reply to  Troy

Excellent idea! I will plan to insist on that when I buy. Even if I’m buying from an individual, I should be able to stay in the RV on their property as it would need to be hooked up to water and electricity (probably not sewer) in order to sell it.

Alvin
1 year ago
Reply to  Chuck Woodbury

Chuck and I and a few other folks (mostly those AFTER experiencing RV hell) are on the same page holding RV manufacturers feet to the fire.
Problem is not enough people do.
Way to many folks among us accept that “there will be problems” placing themselves squarely in the hands of the dealer network which in ever jurisdiction I can think of is in constant overload mode, or simply can’t fix the faults to the consumers satisfaction.

I returned a product two years ago I bought brand new with 42 faults in it – seven of which were saftey related. I retain the pictures, the text, and every related document pertaining of all conversations to proof it.

That dealer,(which I researched to infinity for reliability/honest practices and so on) in business since 1969, claimed they had never before, given a customer their money back on a transaction, (which I doubt) In my case they did, when I indicated I would be starting the wheels in motion to expose the producing company, and the crap quality to the world. I got my cheque – vowing that if they’d given , or offer their crap to me FREE I would reject the offer.

Also, never pay a PDI fee, administration fee, or any thing else some dealers try to hang on the end of that piece of paper, while your back is turned, before you sign or hand over the cheque. Wise to remember – a large part of the profitability in most transportation vehicle sales, takes place in the finance office. To be forewarned is to be forearmed.