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Tesla electric semitruck inspires all-electric Class A RV

An all-electric Class A RV based on Tesla’s commercial semitruck is in the concept phase. The motor coach would be powered by four electric motors—like the Tesla Semi, weigh around 50,000 lbs., have a 600-mile range, and use less than 2 kWh per mile.

Tesla delivered its first all-electric semitruck to PepsiCo on December 1st.

On December 1, 2022, Tesla delivered its first all-electric semitruck to PepsiCo in Nevada, marking the start of commercial deliveries of the Class 8 Tesla Semi. Elon Musk attended the debut and made a few remarks about the Maximum Gross Weight of the truck (81,000 lbs.) and the loaded range of the initial two models of the semitruck, 300 and 500 miles. Musk did not mention an updated price which, at the introduction of the truck concept in 2017, he said would be $150,000 for the 300-mile capable version and $180,000 for the 500-mile tractor-trailer rig. It is reasonable to surmise that these prices will have risen substantially in more than five years since the initial announcement.

1,000 kWh battery pack

The Tesla Semi is powered by a 1,000-kWh battery system that is carried beneath the truck’s cab. Tesla is working to increase battery charging power and speed up charge rates. The Semi is equipped with the company’s “V4” charging system that includes a liquid-cooled immersion charging cable capable of handling more than a megawatt of charging power.

The Tesla electric semitruck will be charged at 1+ Mega-Watt by using the liquid-cooled V4 charging cable.

Other e-RVs are in development

The first Winnebago design to enter the electric RV arena is the e-RV van built on the Ford Transit chassis.

Other e-RV possibilities have been floated, including one by Winnebago. The Winnebago electric RV has not yet been put into production, but there is a fully operational concept vehicle in service, and Winnebago has introduced it as a likely production camper van. It is set on the Ford Transit chassis, and the company says has an 86-kWh battery that will have a 125-mile range between charges. Winnebago claims that the range is adequate for more than half of the RV buyer population, who make trips under 200 miles. Winnebago said that it anticipates that advances in battery technology will increase the range in the years ahead.

“Consumer demand is driving electric power applications across many fronts, and we believe RV consumers are poised to benefit from the enhanced features and usability that electrified and connected RV products will provide,” said Ashis Bhattacharya, Winnebago Industries’ senior vice president of business development, advanced technology, and enterprise marketing.

Tesla’s big-rig idea may have seemed incredible back when it was first introduced in 2017, but the pace of technology has potentiated into the reality of the Tesla Semi in 2022, and no one should be surprised to see Tesla or other innovators leverage the design to create an exciting zero-emission recreational vehicle in the months ahead.

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ASISEEIT
1 month ago

FOUR rear axles? How much do they think this monster is going to weigh?

Richard Chabrajez
1 month ago

The Elephant in the living room; Existing charging stations can’t be used for ANY of these concepts. That means an entirely, as yet undeveloped charging infrastructure for these beasts. There would have to be MANY exclusive charging lanes at every truck stop. If you’re a trucker with a schedule to keep, you’re not getting in and out in any reasonable time frame. And just let me take up one of those lanes with my 50K lb EV motor coach. “Don’t look Ethel!!”

chris
1 month ago

I think the idea right now is to charge while they sleep.

Bill
1 month ago

Current EV’s are not going anywhere in the vehicle market. They are only a step in the evolution of a vehicle that is powered by nuclear energy. The vehicle will never have to be charged eliminating demands on infrastructure and long lines at the charging station or time spent charging. More importantly nuclear powered vehicles (NPV’s) will not produce battery waste nor expensive premature battery failure and mining of precursors to make the battery. The vehicle will be driven a million miles with very little maintenance. After a crash the nuclear power plant will simply be placed into another NPV.

chris
1 month ago
Reply to  Bill

Car makers are seeing a great demand for EVs.

Denny
1 month ago

Sign me up sans electric but with Diesel fuel!🤪

Dick Hime
1 month ago

Catastrophic fire potential and a waste disposal nightmare. There is no free lunch without safe nuclear fusion technology which does not yet exist. .

KellyR
1 month ago
Reply to  Dick Hime

Maybe storing the battery waste, or figuring out a way to recycle will come. The problem with gasoline and diesel is that its waste is going into our air. Thus we may be living in an exhaust cloud such that we cannot see the forest for the trees.

chris
1 month ago
Reply to  KellyR

All these anti-EV environmentalists don’t seem to have a problem with pouring billions of tons of Co2 into the atmosphere.

Carlos Lourenco
1 month ago

Not in my lifetime, nor would I take one if given to me free of charge. Pepsi can afford to try one, once it fails they will have a very,very expensive yard goat.

ChuckJ
1 month ago

I would agree. The EV may be the car of the future, but not now. Too many hidden costs. I don’t think the technology has even been invented, or at least perfected, that will move the masses. Also “unintended consequences” could be astronomical’..

Lisa Stewart
1 month ago
Reply to  ChuckJ

You said that well.

B N S
1 month ago

Yep!

David Shelton
1 month ago

That comes from a mindset which had witnessed a laptop battery die too quickly. I have a 2018 Nissan Leaf which main battery is supposed to outlast the car. I think those EV semis will last a curiously long time.

Maurizio Taglianini
1 month ago

Planet Earth Land Transportation:

From Horses to Rail to EV… More Fresh Air!

More Evolution Less Revolution 🙂

Bob Heacock
1 month ago

Meanwhile in Indonesia, a country with vast resources of nickel, necessary for batteries, hundreds of villages have been eliminated in favor of huge, open pit mining operations. The dust from the mining turns daylight into perpetual twilight. Cases of asthma and deaths from lung cancer are way up.
Nearby nickel smelting plants are powered by coal-fired power stations, belching thousands of tons of pollutants into the atmosphere. Nickel smelting requires huge amounts of water which is drawn from the ocean, then recycled back into the sea, turning the water a murky brown. Fishing, as livelihood, is gone because all the fish are dead.
Those who live in the remaining villages in the area are press-ganged into working in the mines and factories at subsistence wages, and those who object are conveniently “disappeared”.
Clean Electric Power may be a wonderful thing, so long as the human and environmental degradation happens in somebody else’s country.

Lisa Stewart
1 month ago
Reply to  Bob Heacock

So sad

chris
1 month ago
Reply to  Bob Heacock

But pouring billions of tons of Co2 into the atmosphere from burning gas is not a problem for you.

Last edited 1 month ago by chris
MattD
1 month ago
Reply to  Bob Heacock

Thank you for this. This is exactly my point!

Bob Heacock
1 month ago

So where do I find a charging station with a “liquid cooled immersion charging cable capable of handling more than a megawatt of charging power ?” And what of that “megawatt charging station?” I’m sure a big company like Pepsi can afford all this, and the 2017 price of $180,000 for the electric Semi, but where does an ‘ordinary’ person with their ‘all electric class A RV’ find this kind of infrastructure?

Joseph Phebus
1 month ago

Cue the reflexive naysayers.

Visionaries and innovation used to be America’s strength and we were the envy of the world as a result.

But now that corporations have cultivated a culture of quarter to quarter maximizing short term profits, country and long-term survival be damned (hey, if all else fails there’s always that golden parachute).

Left to this bunch, we’d all be using hand saws, horses and buggies .

Dick Hime
1 month ago
Reply to  Joseph Phebus

Not so much naysayers as realists. Dreams are great, reality requires much more.

KellyR
1 month ago
Reply to  Joseph Phebus

If I understand you correctly, like it or not, it was “this bunch” that dug the coal, the iron ore and all the other minerals that got us away from hand saws and buggies. They created railroads, foundries for our steel, electricity, and the entire industrial revolution. Man has been tearing up this earth since Man began. Thus we have heat, cool, oil, cars, electricity, and our investment in their companies feed our 401Ks. Those companies actually do or did feed a lot of us. You bet that there are a bunch of bad players, but like it or not, we all are dependent on each other in one way or another.

Joseph Phebus
1 month ago
Reply to  KellyR

You missed my point. At the beginning of the industrial revolution, undoubtedly there were the same naysayers bunch for all you listed. Ditto for rho claiming the earth was flat. Solving problems and innovation is never easy and never without consequences, zig zags or failures along the way. But taking risks and forging ahead in the face of those – this bunch-who would prefer to sit on their hands and whine is necessary if we are to progress and survive as a species.

KellyR
1 month ago
Reply to  Joseph Phebus

Thanks for the reply. I read and reread. I now think maybe we are both on the same train — of thought. I still have my hand saws and wish I could afford a horse and buggy. lol

SkipN
1 month ago

The weight concerns me. At 50,000 pounds there will be little weight left for the people and their stuff.

Lee Ensminger
1 month ago
Reply to  SkipN

Plus, people who have no training will be driving those 50,000 lb. vehicles. What could possibly go wrong?

Diane Mc
1 month ago

Tens of thousands of charging stations, wind turbines on the hills and in the oceans, solar panel arrays filling the landscapes. Majority made in China, one of our best friends😉, using slave labor to mine the minerals needed. What happened to keeping nature pristine & unharmed by man. I’m not anti EV, Love the Tesla’s. Concern is that it will definitely challenge our electric grid as well as environmental issues. Maybe the rest of the country will get to experience rolling brown/black outs like us in California.

David Binkley
1 month ago

Cart WAY before horse. Not to mention the environmental costs those who love these things hate to discuss realistically.

KellyR
1 month ago
Reply to  David Binkley

The car was a cart before the horse, but then gas stations caught up to where we could travel distances in those noisy contraptions.

MattD
1 month ago

Next up, vast, open pit mines using gigantic diesel powered mining equipment and slave labor in 3rd world countries to extract rare earth materials to manufacture batteries. We have GOT to find more efficient ways to store power before we push this technology. Moratoriums should be in place before we do. Just my opinion.

David Binkley
1 month ago
Reply to  MattD

Exactly.

David V
1 month ago
Reply to  MattD

Exactly! Although, Some mining magnate has decided to go back to his hometown of Winnemucca NV to start destroying the landscape and environment to mine lithium. He stated it would boost the economy of the town. Yep, environmental damage in the name of progress! You just gotta love the mutated logic.

KellyR
1 month ago
Reply to  MattD

“Next up, vast, open pit mines using gigantic diesel powered mining equipment…” Yep, just like we do to get iron ore, aluminum,, copper, nickel, oil, silver, gold, diamonds, silicon, … Which of these rare earth materials do we want to give up? Each that I mentioned was a discovery that has moved Man forward in his evolution. This current discovery may be the one to save mankind before the oil gives out. It is frequently messy getting from point A to point B.

MattD
1 month ago
Reply to  KellyR

Oh yeah, so let’s just go on and tear up the planet wherever and whenever we want like the robber barons of the 19th century, especially when driving an EV is merely virtue signaling, or not much more than a grown up toy at this point in time. I’m saying let’s find a better way to store electricity FIRST, besides Li-ion or LiFePO batteries. It just makes sense. And what makes you think oil will give out?

Bob M
1 month ago

When I first seen the the Tesla Semi aerodynamic design I thought it would be a great design for Class A motorhomes. Maybe even a smaller version for class B rvs. But our rv manufacturers are to lazy to lazy and cheap to design aerodynamic motorhomes and travel trailers. Maybe our government needs to force rv manufacturers to increase milage on RVs. For Americans to save fuel. A new Ford Transit electric fan I saw for sale gets less than 100 miles on a charge. If I couldn’t get the distance an ICE vehicles. I would not buy an electric vehicle. Of course the dealers ad didn’t indicate what the distance would be for a loader van.

Larry L
1 month ago

Winnebago claims that the 125 mile range is adequate for more than half of the RV buyer population, who make trips under 200 miles? I’m not sure where they got their statistics from, but 125 mile range is no where near what I would want in an RV. The only reason “Consumer demand is driving electric power applications across many fronts” is because this is being shoved down our throats. “Green” is not fact at this time and is environmentally dangerous. I’m fairly certain we will get there someday, but we’re no where even close now.

Roger V
1 month ago
Reply to  Larry L

We toured the Winnebago Class B at the Tampa RV show last January. Yes, it’s a joke at this point. Not a great Class B floorplan even if it had a gas engine. Just there to make a PR splash. The W rep was lonely. It probably did draw in a few shoppers who quickly went on to the other rigs. Successful in that respect at least.

Mitzi Agnew Giles and Ed Giles
1 month ago

We picked up our electric molded fiberglass Snoozy in December of 2016. I felt it had much 2 recommend it. I am already having memory issues, and having been a troop leader 4 many years, was quite aware of everything that could go wrong with propane, butane white gas etc. The trailer is 17 feet tip of tongue to rear bumper and weighs about in the neighborhood of 2463 lbs(maybe I got the numbers scrambled. ) but I know for certain that it started with 2,000 lbs) We do have to run the generator, and I know others have put solar panels on theirs. Let me put in a plug here for their mattress- I have sciatica among other bone problems, and I have found that mattress so comfortable as to minimize medication needs 4 pain. Gasoline needs are minimized because it is so light. These others are interesting, but I feel my small all electric camper certainly minimizes the demand on the electrical network.

Steve
1 month ago

So Dave thinks the maintenance costs will be lower. Well wait till the charger fails, or the cooling system, the cables, or batteries need replacing. I’m sure you will have sticker shock and be stuck with a 30 ton boat anchor. Then there’s finding someone to work on these. Our grids can not handle these at this time. I think they’re moving too fast.

Bruce H.
1 month ago

Someone needs to check their math! Uses only “1.7kw of electricity per hour”.  If true they have come very close to reducing rolling resistance, friction and air resistance to near zero! HAHA

“the Tesla Semi, weigh around 50,000 lbs., have a 600-mile range, and use 1.7kw of electricity per hour.”

Byron G
1 month ago
Reply to  Bruce H.

A loaded class 8 semi can’t move on 1.7KwH of power. That is only 2.278 HP. 1.7 KwH can be produced with a Honda Eu2200i generator which weights 48 lbs. Expecting a 48 lbs generator to operate a 50,000 – 80,000 lbs vehicle is not realistic.

J Paul
1 month ago
Reply to  Byron G

Yep! The author needs to review his physics notes. kW is a measure of power; kWh is energy. kW/hour makes no sense! Megawatt chargers would dim a small town. The power grid would have to be reinforced using more materials that themselves create pollution.

I hope we don’t have to ration household electricity so folks can drive to work.

The reality is that even horses create pollution (methane). Proposing technical solutions by the nontechnical is risky.

Bruce H.
1 month ago
Reply to  Byron G

I realize its only 2.28HP, that’s why I pointed it out. However geared down enough 2HP can move a 50,000lb vehicle, just not very fast… likely measured in feet per hour.

Roger V
1 month ago

I don’t doubt it’s coming, but the Tesla Semi? Many years from now…maybe. These things use Megawatt charging at special charging stations designed for the capacity and size. Forget charging them at Tesla Supercharging stations unless you’ve got 24 hours to get a few hundred miles of charge and you actually have space to park it. Good luck finding a Megacharger at any campground in the next 10-15 years.

Last edited 1 month ago by Roger V

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