The Business of Work Camping: Making our new-to-us RV comfortable

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By Sam Suva
What happens when the current camper becomes the old camper? We need to remove and replace the old creature comforts for new ones. The first part of this is “The Business of Work Camping: Making our new-to-us RV livable.” (Click here if you missed it.)

Once we brought our new-to-us motorhome, well, home, we made it comfortable. The TV was tube type, from the early 2000s. The stuff from the previous owner had to get out. Have you noticed that if you purchase a used RV there are always leftovers? Sometimes fun, interesting and even useful, but not plates or cups or linens – those needed to be gone.


We purchased and installed new televisions and put a 12-volt DC-powered CCTV camera system in it. We also installed a weather system that measured wind and rain amounts and “forecast” weather including severe weather. Living in an RV, it is good to at least be warned of impending severe weather.

The refrigerator immediately quit on us so we installed a new 3-way refrigerator. The old Polar Aire ceiling vent didn’t work and the bathroom powered vent was inoperative. Those were all addressed and we began to move in.

We began to remove items from the previous motorhome. Because we could not simply purchase items specific for the RV, we had to be careful about which items we removed until we could comfortably live in just one of the motorhomes.

While this order worked for us, it may not work for everyone:

  • We were able to park the two motorhomes next to each other on two campsites; this was very convenient.
  • We repaired those items that needed it and did a deep clean!!
  • We moved in extra cooking items and kitchen appliances first – those we would not need in the amount of time we had to move.
  • Staples including cooking ingredients were next, as well as cooking utensils.
  • Linens, off-season clothes and extra footwear were transferred next.
  • Down to the last few days, we moved over personal items as well as bathroom and shower items.
  • Finally we moved over everyday items like computers, refrigerator items, personal hygiene, pillows and medicine.

Interestingly enough, we were able to cull through our belongings and come up with more than 10 totes of things that we could get rid of, so that was an eye-opener for us. We call that a reset, where we empty the motorhome and live for the next 30 days with just what we need, then sell, donate or destroy what we don’t use. Next year will be our 12th year full-timing, so we will do another reset. That will be interesting.

What are your experiences with new-to-you RV’s? Did you find trash or treasure? Were you able to remodel and repair? Or did you have to live with some of the new RV’s eccentricities? Did you add items like a second air conditioner? Please let me know in the comments below. Remember to leave a LIKE on the top if you found this enjoyable or useful. And, as always,

See you down the road,

Sam

Sam Suva and his wife are work campers. They began work camping more than 10 years ago and have spent a lot of time working as they traveled. In this new weekly feature, they will share their experiences with you, with an emphasis on how to incorporate work camping into a full time RV lifestyle.

Read more articles about Work Camping.

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