What we learned about you (December 22-January 4)

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By Emily Woodbury

Hello and welcome back to What we learned about you! Your favorite (right?) feature on RVtravel (aw, shucks. I’m blushing). We skipped a week last week, so we’ve got a lot to catch up on. I’m jumping right in…

On December 27th (our only Daily Tips newsletter that week), we wanted to know if you traveled to spend time with friends or family this Christmas. Most of you (44 percent) did not travel at all, a lucky 26 percent of you got to stay put while friends and family came to you, 27 percent of you drove to see friends or family for Christmas this year, and 4 percent of you flew somewhere (me!).

Then, curious about New Year’s, last Saturday we asked: Do you plan to attend a party on New Year’s Eve? Nope, 79 percent of you did not. Only a small 16 percent of you said you would attend a party, and 4 percent answered “maybe.”


On Monday we asked kind of a silly question: Do you prefer to sleep in total darkness or have some light? Most of you, 59 percent, say you’d prefer to sleep in pitch black, but 40 percent of you like a little light, like a nightlight. Only 9 voters said they need more than a nightlight.

On Tuesday we wanted to know how good of a swimmer you are, and luckily most of you would be okay if you found yourself in the water. More than half of you, 57 percent, say you can swim, however, you’d be in trouble if you had to swim too far; but a large 28 percent of you say you’re excellent swimmers. Impressive! Like me, 7 percent of you answered that you can doggie paddle, and 8 percent of you can swim as well as a rock. Ha!

Did you know that Amazon has more than 100 million Prime members worldwide? That’s just a few people – jeesh! Are you one of them? Yup, according to Wednesday’s survey, 51 percent of you say that you have a Prime account, and 20 percent of you say that someone else in your household has one. A little more than a quarter of you, 28 percent, do not have a Prime account. Why not? You can buy things like this. Wink.

Do you carry an air compressor in your RV? That’s what we asked on Thursday. Good, 79 percent of you do, but 21 percent of you do not. Reader Richard Hubert commented, “The real question that should be asked is – ‘Do you check and adjust all your RV tires before each travel day?’ I know most people have an air compressor, but I ALMOST NEVER see anyone actually checking their tire pressures – even after staying in many different RV parks. I believe that having properly inflated tire pressures is the #1 most important DIY safety check – yet I have seen almost no one actually doing this.” So, moral of the story? Listen to Richard. Check your tire pressure!

Thanks for another great few weeks, folks. I hope you had a relaxing couple of weeks with your family and friends. We’re looking forward to learning more about you in 2019. Cheers!


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Einar
Einar

We just have a small Air Hawk. But it has come in handy a few times. It does the job and is small to store in my truck or camper.

Dan
Dan

I check tire pressure on my TPMS. I visually check all my tires. My 40′ 04 Newmar Mountain Aire diesel pusher has an engine driven air compressor for air brakes and suspension, plus I have a 180psi ViAir twin compressor with tank.

David B.
David B.

What type of air compressor do you carry?

Anthony Joel Vinson
Anthony Joel Vinson

California Airtools, 1 gallon. It’s quiet and it goes to 150#.

Larry Z.
Larry Z.

Viair 450P-RV

Bob p
Bob p

If I don’t check my tire pressure my tpms will drive me crazy if a tire is out of specs.

Herb Dinken
Herb Dinken

In response to Richard Hubert’s comment, I check my air pressure every day before we hit the road. I turn on my TPMS and watch the readout while sipping my coffee.

Wolfe

That wouldn’t work with my TPMS… since my display is cordless/solar, it never turns off (in fact, seemingly can’t). The tire senders seem to “sleep” when not in motion. So, in the morning, it will show the last (higher pressure/temp) reading from the last drive. In the first 100yds rolling, the tires all clearly update fresh readings, so I seldom bother to blank the display to force updates. My point is, folks here need to make sure they know how their TPMS works to know what it is telling them, when, why.