RV Daily Tips Newsletter Issue 1169

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019
Welcome to another edition of RV Travel’s Daily Tips newsletter. Here you’ll find helpful RV-related and living tips from the pros, travel advice, a handy website of the day, tips on our favorite RVing-related products and, of course, a good laugh. Thanks for joining us. We appreciate you. Please tell your friends about us.

Beginning this week we will add a Friday edition to RV Daily Tips. 


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Today’s thought

“Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.” —Sir Isaac Newton

Need an excuse to celebrate? Today is National Apple Dumpling Day.



Tip of the Day

Fixing a stuck black tank valve
A stuck or malfunctioning black tank valve is something we’d all like to avoid. Fixing the valve can be a stinky, messy nightmare if the tank is full. Some RV repair shops will refuse to fix or replace the valve. So that leaves you to undertake what could be a disgusting task. But good news! Here’s a tip that can make the repair much easier, with hardly any mess.

Here’s what to do. Raise the “valve” side of the RV (typically the driver’s side) as high as you can so the valve is uphill. Gravity will force some of the contents back down into the tank, leaving the very end of the drain pipe empty. When the valve is then opened to repair or replace, only a few drops of sewage will spill out, making the task fairly routine.


Reader poll



Free travel information

NEW MEXICO VISITOR GUIDE

Helpful resources

NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND ROAD CLOSURE INFORMATION.
ROAD AND TRAFFIC CONDITIONS ACROSS THE NATION.
WEATHER ALERTS FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE.
CURRENT WILDFIRE REPORT.
LATEST RV RECALLS.



Random RV Thought

Never consider using an RV’s leveling jack to lift a wheel off the ground to change a flat tire. They are not strong enough for that purpose.


California Camping: Moon Handbook guide profiles 1,400 campgrounds. Updated 2019.


Website of the day

Colorado Mountain Passes
Colorado’s mountain passes are the highest in the country. Trail Ridge, U.S. 34, in Rocky Mountain National Park, is the highest continuous auto road in the country reaching 12,183 feet. Here’s a guide to this spectacular road and others.


Affordable tire tool will save you tons of troubleRV Travel Newsletter Issue 912
What gives when you think your tires are “good to go” but down on air again the next day? Your valve stem valve probably isn’t tight enough. A loose, leaking valve stem can cause a tire failure due to low pressure under load at highway speeds. So do yourself and your vehicles a favor – pick up one of these very inexpensive tools and make sure your valve cores are snugly seated in the valve stem. Click here to order.


How to protect trailer hitch from rust, corrosion with WD-40

Trailer hitches get a lot of exposure to the elements on highways, even when stored outside, leaving them at risk for developing rust and corrosion. Protect your hitch and receiver with WD-40 Big Blast by spraying as you see in the short video.


Best selling RV accessories and supplies at Amazon.com. Huge selection!


And the Survey Says…

We’ve polled RVtravel.com readers more than 1,500 times in recent years. Here are a few things we’ve learned:

• Ninety-two percent carry a first aid kit in their RV.
• Seventeen percent never read a printed RV magazine.
• Eighty-four percent find it more challenging to find space in an RV park than ten years ago.



Trivia

A baguette means wand, stick or baton in French, which refers to the shape of its long, narrow loaf. No one knows why the baguette is the shape it is, but one story is that Napoleon Bonaparte insisted that all bread baked for his soldiers should fit into the pocket of their uniforms. It’s an interesting theory and could be true. If not, it sounds good!


Leave here with a laugh

A woman goes to a psychic and contacts her recently dead husband. “Are you happy?” she asks. “Yes,” says the husband, “I’m in a field surrounded by beautiful cows.” “Can you see any angels?” asks the woman. “No, but there’s a prize-winning cow standing in front of me, a real stunner.” “Have you seen God?” asks the woman. “No,” replies the husband. “But the cows are spectacular.” “Why do you keep going on about cows?” shouts the woman, irritated. “Sorry,” says the husband, “I forgot to mention – I’m in Wisconsin. I’ve come back as a bull.”

Today’s Daily Deals at Amazon.com
Best-selling RV products and Accessories at Amazon.com
. UPDATED HOURLY.


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RV Daily Tips Staff

Editor and Publisher: Chuck Woodbury. Managing editor: Diane McGovern. Advertising director: Emily Woodbury. Marketing director: Jessica Sarvis. Financial affairs director: Gail Meyring. IT wrangler: Kim Christiansen.

ADVERTISE on RVtravel.com and/or in this newsletter. Contact Emily Woodbury at advertising(at)RVtravel.com.

Everything in this newsletter is true to the best of our knowledge. But we occasionally get something wrong. We’re just human! So don’t go spending $10,000 on something we said was good simply because we said so, or fixing something according to what we suggested (check with your own technician first). Maybe we made a mistake. Tips and/or comments in this newsletter are those of the authors and may not reflect the views of RVtravel.com or this newsletter.

Mail us at 9792 Edmonds Way, #265, Edmonds, WA 98020.

This newsletter is copyright 2019 by RVtravel.com

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Richard Hubert

Re Use of Leveling Jacks – I know that all manufacturers say that the jacks are not to be used for work or tire changing. But it is an obvious legal CYA situation. As full timers in a 38′ Class A I always use my jacks for at least stability and minor leveling in every spot we stay at. But there are also often situations where more leveling is required, and the jacks have no problem in taking any wheel right off the ground if necessary. If needed I do make sure the rear tires maintain ground contact so the parking brake is effective, but have no problem taking the front tires up as necessary. The jacks have no problem doing that, and I have stayed that way for several weeks with no hydraulic leakage or change in jack heights.

I think that as with most RV systems they work best if used continually. So using them at each site helps ensure the motors & valves are exercised, as well as keeping the jack pistons and seals better lubricated.

Sharon B

Yes it is easy to haul a small trailer. I love mine and it has everything I need..shower, toilet, 2 burner stove, gaucho sofa turns into a full size bed, dining table also good in a bed, A/C, refrig, and other goodies that make me happy. The ONLY problem is that it has 2 wheels. If I should have a blow out I am doomed. Any recommendations on how to balance this trailer if I should have a blow out? I wish there was something I could attach on the frame that would drop down a small tire to balance the trailer if that should happen. I know that is a pipe dream but I still feel optimistic that there will be something sold at the shows that would work.

Rich Wielechowski

Thinking about trading for smaller camper. Have a 32 foot TT. Finding out would be a lot easier pulling and parking a smaller rig.

Sally G

I wish more RVers understood that the leveling jacks are NOT intended to bear the weight of a coach! I’m always horrified to see people in campgrounds who have the entire front section of their coach supported only by the front leveling jacks, with the wheels way up in the air.
What do other readers do when they see this – is it appropriate to mention to the RVer that what they are doing is unsafe, and likely to void any warranty on the jacks??

Joe

Many times I have seen Motorhomes at RV parks with at least 2 wheels completely off the ground. Just recently after taking the time to make sure that my front tires were supported by blocking my RV neighbor next to me asked why I was concerned. After I explained it he told me that’s what the jacks are supposed to do. All week long whenever someone moved around their RV wiggled and shifted.

Karen

I subscribed, when does the no advertisements version start?

Judy G

Actually I did just sell my RV.

Jeff

I am glad that someone finally said something about using your leveling jacks to change Flat Tires. Lippert Industries who makes most Leveling systems on RVs, specifically DOES NOT recommend using Leveling jacks to raise the RV to change a Flat Tire. It is NOT only dangerous, but can damage the Leveling system and void any warranty that may exist!

Your best bet for changing FLATS is to invest in a ROAD SIDE Assistance Service, (and NOT GOOD SAMS). COACH NET is the best one going!

Let’s be safe out there!