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Plans change. What do you do as a sick full-time RVer?

By Lisa Adcox
You are full-timer RVers and enjoying life. Suddenly life changes. One of you gets sick. What do you do as a sick full-time RVer, or as the caregiver for a sick full-time RVer?

My husband had a stroke. He can no longer do all the little things that are needed as an RVer. Now he’s dealing with the frustrations that come along with accepting that life has changed. I have found my life changed too. I do all the things I have always done but now all of those things for him too.

Lisa and her husband

When something like this happens, what’s next? You realize that for now, at least in the near future or longer, you need to make new plans. You need to swallow your pride and ask for help. We are finding moving back close to family is what is best for us.

So why am I writing this? To tell you please plan as best you can in case of emergency. If you or your partner become a sick full-time RVer, have plans A, B and C. When one doesn’t work, move on and try the next.

If you are the caregiver, do not hold all the stress in. You must let it out. Ask for help. I know this is not what is considered RV-related, per se, but for those of you who travel full-time and your RV is home, please please please have a plan (or three). I can’t imagine if we had never spoken about the “What Ifs.”

We have been fortunate to have great friends and acquaintances here that have stepped up to support us. Not all of us who live the full-time RV life have the support we need.

We are leaving the full-time RV life but we hope to still enjoy those few camping trips a year. Be safe out there and make sure you make a plan.

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LMH
2 months ago

My husband had a series of heart attacks but could still work. A few years later, he passed away. He was cremated per his wishes. It took me a few years but I finally managed to keep my last promise to him and scattered his ashes “back home”. One of my daughters moved into my RV and we pool our resources to keep going. One day, we will move back east and park on a piece of family property. But that day isn’t now. But that was always the plan. A bit of land with septic and electric on it (formerly a mobile home was on it).

Lois
2 months ago

The plan. (deep breath). I learned to tow our fiver. I need instruction on hooking it up, but I could do it. It is our home. We would head to Livingston, Texas to our Escapees Park. I have a medical background. We have no intentions of another sticks home. Ramps, altering space for a bed….etc. I pray your husband will get better and better. Maybe a class C for short trips.

Mitzi Agnew Giles and Ed Giles
5 months ago

It was the first thing I learned in Boy Scouting- Always have a Plan B! (and I had a plan C usually as well!)

This next comment is based on my years as a long term care nurse- 12 years, and my 24 years after that as a Hospice nurse. I saw many wives, coming each day to visit their severely disabled husbands, and in the course of talking with them would find out these men had dedicated their totality of being to their jobs, reassuring their wives that “someday” they would take that monthlong cruise, travel in Europe or the Orient, fly to New Zealand for a long leisurely vacation…and these men would retire, and usually within a year, before that “someday” they had promised to their wives, they would have a massive stroke or heart attack or a rapidly fulminating cancer…That is not really a sexist statement, there were a lot more dedicated -to-their-career men than women in the 1950s thru the new century. Nowadays, when I am retired from nursing, I wonder if there are not some

Mitzi Agnew Giles and Ed Giles
5 months ago

continued from above-…husbands visiting severly impaired wives, and mourning the life that had been put on hold till “someday” came??
My point is- don’t put off living till “someday”. You CAN have it all, just sometimes in smaller increments than you had counted on.

Terri Foxx-Wishert
5 months ago

For those reasons, we did not sell our home. We found a great management company, and we have leased out our home – unfurnished, except for the piano. We had an RV garage, besides a regular garage. We reserved the RV garage, and that’s where our household stuff is stored. The house is handicap accessible, one story rambler. It’s not a perfect solution should one of us be unable to travel. So far, in the nomad lifestyle, we’ve each undergone a knee replacement. We winter in Tucson, and this gives us a stable base for some of this nonsense in our lives.
We are also enrolled in an insurance plan that will ‘get us home.’ Even if it means that we fly home, and the RV is driven by a contract driver. Our kids are happy with that, because none of them would be comfortable bringing the 5th wheel home.

DPankie
5 months ago

My suggestion is, Look into joining FMCA as a cheap medical insurance plan. Their medical assistance benefit will relieve many of the fears coming from being a long way from home. Just knowing they will arrange to get me, my spouse, pets, and RV home with one phone call is well worth their membership.

Terry
5 months ago

As a former full time I tell people to never give up your home without a backup plan. Everyone is getting older and will someday need to leave the RV life and stay home. You need to always keep a place to return to some day or the money to move into a home where a disabled person can live. Everyone need to plan for when not If something changes.

Martha Goudey
5 months ago

We were a year and a few months into our dream of full time RVing. We had sold the house and were traveling in our new 2016 Casita. And then…I was diagnosed with cancer. We were staying in an RV park in Ajo Arizona. We traveled each week for nine weeks to Phoenix for chemo treatment. Then we moved into an apartment for seven weeks to do radiation. But each weekend we returned to our Casita so I could hear the coyotes sing. Then we moved in with family for three months to do more chemo…to help them on their land and for me to have respite. In other words we made it all work. At the end of treatment I was clear but still at risk. But for the next almost three years we continued our travels. The dream was alive. Then June 2021 it came crashing down again. Metastasis into my liver. We moved onto some land with friends and in the fall we bought a bigger trailer to live in. Here it is March 2022 and I’m still in treatment, still hanging onto the dream. But life and dreams have changed.

Admin
RV Staff(@rvstaff)
5 months ago
Reply to  Martha Goudey

Wow! So sorry to hear about all of your health issues, Martha. We wish you strength and peace as you continue on your difficult journey, with lots of fun RVing in your future. Take care. 🙂 –Diane

Martha Goudey
5 months ago
Reply to  RV Staff

Thank you Diane

Admin
RV Staff(@rvstaff)
5 months ago
Reply to  Martha Goudey

You’re welcome, Martha. Good luck. Hugs. –Diane

Dave
5 months ago

Excellent article to give perspective. Life happens. Be prepared to adjust.

As we get older, we need to know when to quit RVing. Plus, don’t blow all of your money RVing; so when you need to stop RVing, you can afford the new life.

Bob p
5 months ago
Reply to  Dave

Since 1978 I dreamed of full timing when I retired from GM. Upon retiring my late wife announced she was not selling her home(nest) and moving into our 5th wheel. She was having health issues so I no longer pushed the issue, that was 1999. She passed away in 2015. Since then I’ve remarried to a wonderful lady who has a venturesome personality, but now we are in our higher senior years and enjoy a few days away and have our midsized TT. We just moved to FL and are getting settled, I had passing thoughts through the years about health issues but never gave it much thought as I’ve always been “healthy as a horse”. But I’ve started slowing down and starting to feel my age. Lol

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