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These are six critical photos to keep on your phone

What is it that most of us carry no matter where we go? Our cell phones, of course! We may leave our purses or wallets behind, but that cell phone? No way! Where you go, it goes. And for that reason, it’s important that you always keep six critical pieces of information in the form of photos on your phone.

So, what are these photos? Read on to find out.

Six critical photos to keep on your phone

Identification

Driver’s license or official state I.D. card. Take a picture of your official identification. This may be a driver’s license or your state-issued identification card. This card is often needed for proving your identity when picking up a prescription, retrieving prepaid tickets, picking up your child or grandchild from school, writing a check, and more. It’s often easier to pull up a photo of your I.D. than to wrestle the paper version out of your wallet.

Insurance

Health insurance cards. Take a photo of your health insurance cards: medical, dental, and prescription. They’ll be easily retrieved from your cell phone when needed. No more hectic scrambling for cards when you visit your doctor, dentist, or pharmacy.

Auto insurance card. We were happy to have taken a photo of our auto insurance card before our RV was destroyed in a violent windstorm. My purse and my husband’s wallet were both inside our totaled RV and therefore not accessible.

Personal health

Prescribed medications. Take a photo of the medicines you take regularly. Refer to the photo when you must relay this information to a doctor, when ordering a prescription, and more.

Vehicles

Vehicle license plates and VIN numbers. This information may be needed if your vehicle is stolen or involved in an accident. Unless you have a “vanity plate” you probably can’t rattle off the license information off the top of your head. You may need this information when securing insurance, checking into a hotel, and more.

Picture of your RV and tow vehicle. A photo will give law enforcement a jump start in locating a stolen rig (heaven forbid). It may also prove useful if your rig is more than ten years old. Some campgrounds require a photo of older rigs before reserving a campground site for you. (Bonus: Send the picture to RV Travel [if you haven’t already]. If we picture your rig in our newsletter, you may win a prize!)

These are the pictures I consider critical photos to keep on my cell phone. Can you add to the list?

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John
2 months ago

If you do this, the pic of the insurance card should already have the VIN. And I’d keep a pic of the registration paper vs. the license plate, which will definitely have the VIN.

Gary Ashmore
2 months ago

A picture of your dog. They get lost and stolen.

Donn
2 months ago

Yes, its a great idea/suggestion never the less, I’m consternated about it. There could be resulting invasions of my privacy, there could be problems with nefarious invaders, its possible that my info might be running around some “dark” websites after having been seized by some unscrupulous foreign thug from some other religious faith unknown to me, or perhaps I might mislay my Smartphone with no easy way to relocate it or…..perhaps, perhaps, perhaps….I have another thought…I will simply keep copies of my actual records in a secure lock box somewhere in my comfortable little towalong camper, very near to my 9mm anti-theft deterrence device, fully loaded and ready for bears. Just thinking. But, I do like the suggestions for the world we once knew.

Rosalie Magistro
2 months ago
Reply to  Donn

9mm for bears,I’d rethink that caliber..just saying.

Roger V
2 months ago

Pet photos along with pics of their latest vaccination status (esp. rabies) plus their chip numbers (if you have had them chipped). Will come in real handy if they get away from you while travelling. Even better a gps locator like the Fi dog collar and associated tracking information.

Debbie
2 months ago

I’m betting that very few places, especially law enforcement, will accept a picture of a license. Anyone can have a picture. I’m with those who have said that this is not a safe thing to do.

Brian Burry
2 months ago

Some good thoughts on tips for important photos. I NEVER would “Show” my papers for the radical Covid requesters. Just never be Sheeple!

Lawrence Neely
2 months ago

well, I have forgotten my phone more often than my driver license. and I would never put any information on my phone since they are stored in the “cloud”. Which is usually in India. In the defense industry we were always told never store anything online since it can be available to any country at any time. You do not know who is running those “cloud” sites.

Debbie
2 months ago
Reply to  Lawrence Neely

I totally agree.

Roger V
2 months ago
Reply to  Lawrence Neely

That’s true if you’re just surfing the web for a free place to store information without researching and thoroughly understanding the security protocols. Just because it’s in the “cloud” doesn’t mean encryption protocols and standards don’t work though. I’ve worked in both military and NASA IT administration. Ever heard of Amazon AWS? The Defense Department and NASA both use this cloud service and others extensively and have been for years now. Just google the “Department of Defense Cloud Computing Security Requirements Guide” for more information than you’ll ever be able to read.

Last edited 2 months ago by Roger V
Merv
2 months ago

I also take pics of important stuff like those items mentioned, but I find it difficult to find them (Android) so I add pics to a draft email. Makes it easy to find

Edward
2 months ago
Reply to  Merv

Great idea. Thanks!

Leon W
2 months ago

Rather than a photo, I’ve been using an encrypted app for years to keep all my user names, passwords, and notes (like car VIN numbers, license plates, DL numbers, oil filters, you name it!). If I need my weed-eater make, model or serial number, I’ve got it! And I never leave home without my phone. Replace your phone…..log-in and there is all my “stuff”! Norton makes the one I use…Highly recommend from a retired cop!

outlaw
2 months ago

Yall, go ahead and put all your important info on a phone to get hacked or for some thief to steal it, I will stay old fashioned and this is coming from a retired police officer.

Scott
2 months ago
Reply to  outlaw

same thoughts…you seem to feel that your information is safe on the phone. The less information I have stored remotely, the better

Will Perkins
2 months ago

These days a picture of your Covid-19 Vax card is necessary and may be in the future.
We have arrived at the day of having “your papers” to show. Welcome to it.

rich
2 months ago
Reply to  Will Perkins

we’ve never been asked for proof of our jabs and should that ever occur we would refuse, explain why and never patronize that business ever again.

TimM
2 months ago
Reply to  rich

DITTO

DW/ND
2 months ago
Reply to  rich

Rich: Don’t try to cross the Canadian or Mexican border or take an international flight!

cee
2 months ago
Reply to  DW/ND

My thoughts exactly!

What is the big freakin deal.
Are people this wacky about sharing tetanus shot info?

Debbie
2 months ago
Reply to  rich

Amen.

Cecilia
2 months ago
Reply to  rich

I’m sorry you feel that way. We recently attended Come From Away at the National Theater in D.C. No vax card, no entrance. It was packed. I will definitely patronize them again.

Lawrence Neely
2 months ago
Reply to  Will Perkins

never got the non “vaccine”. When they actual develop one I might consider

David
2 months ago

Great tips!
Thanks

Paul
2 months ago

My dr offices always want to scan insurance & id cards. A photo on my phone won’t work for that, although I do have photos of these & others on my phone.

Jewel
2 months ago

Definitely a good idea to keep important information handy. Another thing we keep is an image of our health insurance card, front and back, to include contact information.

TIM MCRAE
2 months ago

CCW card
SS card
Firearm registration cards
Roadside Assistance cards
Veh Insurance & Registration cards
Extended Warranty ID & contracts

I keep all these (plus previously listed) on my phone and in the ‘cloud’. All encrypted & very secure plus my phone is locked.

Soon we will stop carrying the hard copies. Those are too easy to steal or lose.

Peggy Robberts
2 months ago
Reply to  TIM MCRAE

What is the process for encrypting photos on an iphone or in the Cloud?
Signed, Ms Tech-Stupid.

rick
2 months ago
Reply to  TIM MCRAE

Where are fire ams supposed to be registered?

Lawrence Neely
2 months ago
Reply to  TIM MCRAE

what’s a “registered firearm”?

Rebecca
2 months ago

These are great ideas…never thought of it, but I’m going to get right on it. What about your passport if traveling internationally? And pets, in case they get lost.

Ellie
2 months ago
Reply to  Rebecca

Pictures of our pets on my phone I have!!!!

Lori G
2 months ago

Great ideas!
I also keep a photo of my eyeglass Rx & photos of the front & back of cards in my wallet. My phone is always with me & locked so it is more secure than my purse.
Also I have an iPhone so I select “Hide” for all the important photos. Then they are discreetly located by me in my Hidden Photos album if I need them.

Gigi
2 months ago

I disagree with the drivers lic, or medicare card, if your wallet is lost or stolden you will be prime for someone stealing your ID.
And everyone should have an ICUE phone number for who you want contacted in case of emergency. I also have my grown children lised as daughter and son with their names and numbers

TIM MCRAE
2 months ago
Reply to  Gigi

Gigi what are you talking about? Your purse & wallet are the ID theft targets.

How does a photo of your ID cause ID theft?

Brad G. Hancock NH
2 months ago
Reply to  Gigi

Password protect your phone

Ward Simmons
2 months ago

How about your Covid-19 vaccination card?

Brian
2 months ago
Reply to  Ward Simmons

Before doing this make sure you have no apps that have permission to access and share your files. I know this can happen with Dropbox depending on your settings and what about social media apps or apps like Skype & Zoom? I though it was a good idea to photograph passwords till I learned about this potential leak.

Last edited 2 months ago by Brian
Peggy
2 months ago
Reply to  Brian

Would it be safe to place these photos in a folder in Dropbox with no sharing set up, and then delete the photos from your phone?

Brian
2 months ago
Reply to  Peggy

I am not sure

Lawrence Neely
2 months ago
Reply to  Ward Simmons

whats a covid vaccine? When they actually develop one, then I might consider

Smixer
2 months ago
Reply to  Lawrence Neely

And you agree with Alex Jones that those children did not die at Sandy Hook.

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