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Do you feel a threat from wildfires where you live?

Do you feel threatened by wildfires where you live? Already this year, wildfires have erupted — and at a faster pace than ever before so early in the fire season — and homes have been destroyed. Do you fear your home is in danger?

Even places like western Washington, where the land is green year round and the forest floor blanketed with ferns, fires are starting … and growing. The big fires in southern Oregon last fall were a big surprise to many Northwest residents who assumed they were safe in the green belt, where rain was common, even in the summer.

So, to our question — Do you worry about wildfires where you live? Only respond if you live in a house or RV that can’t simply be hooked up and easily moved.

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Deborah Mason
5 months ago

Most of the summers we’ve been here in NW Montana we’ve had fires close enough to do or own pre-pre-evacuation preparation. We have to drive through a corridor of trees on our highway, so we won’t wait for someone to come tell us to get out.

Steve
5 months ago

Never but where I live, we clean up the trash and brush so there is no fuel for a fire, or we control burn to eliminate the potential for a fire. Those who don’t, “Here’s your sign!”

Tom
5 months ago

Worry about wildfires and smoke from them. We evacuated in October 2019 from fire and last year due to smoke. We live about half mile from where fire services stopped a fire in 2019. Blowing embers at 60 miles a hour can spread fires a long way.

Tony Grigg
5 months ago

Rarely a wildfire here in Iowa. Cornfields burn now and then, but they not a threat.

Grant Graves
5 months ago

Full-timer so I avoid those areas this time of year

Cheryl
5 months ago

We did evacuate for a couple of days due to extreme caution on our part. More for smoke issues than actual fire. However we live in a mobile home park with about 1000 homes and only 1 way in and out. We left about noon, by 4 pm it was taking 45 min to 1 hr to get out of park with police directing traffic.

Jeff Craig
5 months ago

Where I live, north of Seattle, I doubt our home would be affected. That said, we are facing 112F in the forecast for tomorrow, and days over 90F have more than doubled in the last 20 years. We are in a drought (in the Rain City…..) while more and more people keep moving up here, escaping other areas of the country that have suffered natural disasters. So, while I am more concerned about windstorms or an earthquake, a wildfire that spreads embers into my neighborhood is a possibility.

Admin
RV Staff(@rvstaff)
5 months ago
Reply to  Jeff Craig

Hi, Jeff. Yep, I’m north of Seattle, also. Remember when the smoke in this area was so thick for more than a week last year that it was difficult to breathe? It was so bad that I even had to cut out my daily walk at the track. (I went this morning before it gets too hot today.) And it’s interesting to me that the smoke last year was from Siberia! And we’ve been “smoked out” by B.C. and California fires, as well. But, at least in Western Washington, we don’t get as many wildfires as other places (knock on wood). I think this is going to be a bad year for wildfires, unfortunately. Take care. 🙂 –Diane

Judy Hallett
5 months ago

We live in Payson, AZ surrounded by forest. Last year a wildfire, caused by a car fire, came within 12 miles of town. Today the Backbone fire caused by lightning on June 16 is still burning. Two small towns north of us were evacuated. The fire crews are doing an awesome job keeping the fire away from the towns. Residents of Pine, AZ have gone back home but the town of Strawberry remains evacuated. Wildfire is a very real threat here in Payson.

rvgrandma
5 months ago

I don’t feel threatened by fire but I see another summer like last summer where smoke was a problem from forest fires all around. Living in the Tri-Cities, WA they say the worst of our smoke was from BC – whose fire season is already in full swing. But, I am thankful I only have to worry about smoke and not fire.

Diane Mc
5 months ago

Live in Silicon Valley surrounded by hills. Distant enough should be ok. Worry about winds blowing embers. Seems hard to believe they could make it where we live. But nature is unpredictable. Do worry about our son, his wife & our 3 granddaughters. They live in a small town 30 miles south of us about 1200 ft up close to hills. Had a fire two years ago, but fire dept was close by & told my son they were ok. The fire he saw was a fire break. Last year they had to evacuate as they were part of the group of fires that ringed the Bay Area. After 3 days they were able to return home. All was ok. My niece lives in the Santa Cruz mountains. They too evacuated, for a week living out of motels/hotels. Home made it, but golf course where her husband works part time & they are members, had severe damage & still closed. Lots of property loss in area. Praying no lightning strikes this year & people not starting fires, accidentally or on purpose.

Gary G
5 months ago

Possible, but HIGHLY unlikely in SW Washington. We still have to be careful and keep trees trimmed and brush cut back from home.

Sink Jaxon
5 months ago

Living in Colorado in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, it’s always on your mind. So we’re moving to Northern Arkansas, in the Ozarks where it’s green and lush. And the fishing is better! 😉

Jeff Craig
5 months ago
Reply to  Sink Jaxon

My family used to live between Rogers and Branson. You may like the fishing, but wait until you have to endure the ‘every-few-years’ ice storms. My parents were stuck on the hill they lived on for a week with no power and no internet/phone.

George B
5 months ago

42 year of living in a CA mountain resort with annual threats of fires, we sold last year and moved back in to the United States where life is good.

Neal Davis
5 months ago

Have never heard of a wildfire in our neck of the woods (i.e., SE Tennessee). Our normal natural disaster is courtesy of tornadoes. Our worst wintry nightmare is freezing rain.

Rolling Coal
5 months ago

There’s a fire burning now, about 7 miles from the RV park we’re staying. We’ve been watching helicopters transporting water buckets from a near-by river to the fire for the last 3 days!

Jim Knoch
5 months ago

I live in SE Louisiana on the edge of the Honey Island Swamp (part of the Pearl River Delta) and with all the rain we’ve been having, I am more afraid that the rainwater ponding in my back yard will top my rubber boots. I’m glad these old live oaks can tolerate being submerged for long periods!

Leslie Schofield
5 months ago

I don’t feel so much of a threat from an actual fire burning our home but do feel a real threat from the smoke created by wildfires. In the past couple of years the smoke from wildfires has been bad even though the fires are no where close ( hundreds of miles away). We barely can see across our lake and the smell of smoke is in the air.

Mike
5 months ago

Same here. The smoke has been terrible from the fires in Arizona

Scoooter
5 months ago

Our home is removed from most threats but there are and have been many wildfires around us. Our biggest problem is the smoke.

MN Anon
5 months ago

My County in NE Minnesota experiences wildfires every few years. My advice is to pay attention, follow directions, heed warnings, and help others do the same. Have a plan. Support Emergency Services, they are a godsend.

Ray
5 months ago

Yes and no regarding feeling threatened by wildfires. We live in a community that is surrounded by many 1000’s of acres of farmland. Last year the fires in Oregon were within 7 mile’s of our commuty, we did not have to evacuate as many other communities near us did. However, it is not inconceivable that fires could reach us especially now that we are experiencing unprecedented high temps. We hit 107 yesterday and are forecast for 115 today, 108 Monday and high 90’s for the next 10 days. This is highly unusual for a area that historically rarely exceeds 80 degrees in the summer.