Do you have a landline telephone?

46

Remember the days when you had to talk on a phone attached to a cord in your kitchen? Remember the days before caller ID, when you actually had to answer the phone to see who was calling? What a thought, huh? Ah… how things have changed.

If we had to guess, we bet hardly any of you have a landline phone anymore. Especially for those of us who travel full-time, or a good part of the year. What’s the use for one of those old things?

Please tell us below if you have a landline phone, or if you just use your cell phone. Maybe you’ll prove our guess wrong… who knows?

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Abe Loughin
15 hours ago

I tried to keep a land line when we first started full-time but the wire kept getting tangled in the 5th wheel’s tires.

Admin
RV Staff (@rvstaff)
14 hours ago
Reply to  Abe Loughin

😆 —Diane at RVtravel.com

Jeff Craig
1 day ago

Haven’t had a landline in over 20 years, and I work for the phone company!
We’ve used our mobile phones for everything, including internet hotspots when we are on the road. Verizon pulled every penny they could out of landline systems and put it into the wireless network buildout (and then sold their ‘rural’ areas to finance their 4G upgrade).

Telemarketers have servers that randomly dial numbers, so you get them on landline, mobile and VoIP services – but there is technology that can block them, but as with any arms race, they’ll figure a way around it eventually.

Ray
1 day ago

We haven’t had a landline since 2010.

Richard Hughes
1 day ago

I have a landline included with my internet/television bundle and our cell phones are no charge, unlimited use included in the package. If we go on the road, we can forward the landline to our cell phone, so we don’t miss those important extended auto warranty calls.

Ray
1 day ago
Reply to  Richard Hughes

Richard, you may have just convinced me to get a landline again, never considered those auto warranty calls not to mention all the free stuff I learn I’ve won.

Tom
1 day ago

During the wildfires the cell service went down and many people didn’t know of approaching fires until sheriff using Hi/Lo alarm headed wound the street and over loudspeakers saying to evacuate. Land line cheap life insurance in my book.

KellyR
1 day ago

We keep our land line. I look at it as cheap insurance. If I call 911, they know where to show up, even if I cannot speak or be understood.

John Koenig
1 day ago

About a decade ago, land line phone prices went through the roof. MOST of the increases were due to “Taxes, Fees & Surcharges” ie NOTHING to do with providing phone service. Also back then, there was little if any “UNLIMITED” calls, texts and especially data (which is why SPAM calls were few to non existent). I dropped my Verizon land line “service” and ported that phone number to Cingular, which was acquired later by AT&T and finally, when AT&T “service” went to heck, got transferred to T-Mobile (who I’ve been with for 4+ years now). I (and I suspect MANY cell phone users) HATE to have to switch carriers. If a carrier simply treated people as VALUED customers, I believe MOST people would STAY with a carrier. Damn those idiot “bean counters”!

Pat
1 day ago

I only have the landline for our house alarm. We’d pay for a new system in a couple of years by not having the landline so I think we’re going to switch.

Grant Graves
1 day ago

It would be interesting to see the answer by age group. Some of my grand-kids would not know what you are even asking about.

Diane Mc
1 day ago

Yes and no. My husband has had his landline number for 40+ years. He wasn’t ready to give it up and some things are tied to it. Plus occasionally a friend from the past will contact him. It was too expensive for the limited use so for $20/m we kept the number but there is a cell number behind it (don’t even know what it is). We rarely answer it. If it’s important or an old friend they will leave a message. We also give that number out if we need to supply a number for some reason, but don’t want them to have our cell number.

DW/ND
1 day ago

We have a landline, with 7 extensions or handsets, which we have had since the 60’s. We also have TracFones. 1 Smart and 1 flip. They are used only for emergency service and when we are on the road. I have about 9,000 minutes and my wife has about 2,500 minutes on our cells.

The robocalls are just about enuff to make me rip the phone off the wall – but alas it is a “reliable” system from CenturyLink and their service is excellent if needed. $5.99 per call for directory assistance – because the phone book is so small you can’t read it anymore! Our internet is also thru CenturyLink.

Marilyn M
1 day ago

We winter in Baja Mexico. Our landline is tied to our internet service – a whopping deal at 389 pesos (less than $20!!),

William Braxton
1 day ago

No landline. I see no reason to have a monthly bill so telemarketers and spammers can call 24/7. Cell alone works for us.

Gordy B
1 day ago

I hate to tell you William, but the telemarketers already have access to cell phone numbers. You can register with the “do not call” service but it only slows them down. We have registered several times and still get calls.

KellyR
1 day ago
Reply to  Gordy B

Between our land line and 2 cells we average 10 spam calls a day – 15 during political seasons. Just recently I have received spam texts on my cell. I have registered to the “do not call” for both land line and cell. For some reason that seemed to make it worse.

Jeff Craig
1 day ago
Reply to  KellyR

Political calls are exempt from the Do-Not-Call list (naturally I won’t comment on the irony that lawmakers had to guarantee THAT loophole). I made a lot of ‘get out the vote’ texts to people in the lead up to Novembers election – if someone replied ‘Stop’ or ‘Remove’, their number was removed from the list.

That said, only telemarketers based in the US are beholding to the D-N-C list, and if you go through their routine, you’ll notice every sales rep has a South Asian (likely India, Pakistan or Bangladesh) accent. That’s because these centers use V0IP servers, and they pay minimum wage rates – for the whole day.

Rich
1 day ago

beyond the low price the Comcast “land line” has three major benefits for us. first, we could keep our mobile numbers private by using our LL as our contact number for businesses, health care and so on. second, we were able to configure the LL to also ring both of our mobile phones, a tremendous comvenience. lastly, we eliminated 99% of spam calls thanks to NoMoRoBo which came at no additional cost with the Comcast line.

Rich
1 day ago

we had a traditional copper line from AT&T for decades. costs kept creeping up to the point that it was running just over $100 p/month. at the same time we were paying $50 p/m for an internet DSL line from Earthlnk. we wanted to make a change. we already had Comcast cable and Comcast was offering their “triple play” bundle of cable tv, internet and phone. so we canceled AT&T and Earthlink for a saving of $1800 p/year and went with the Comcast triple play which ended up costing *less* than what we had been paying for just cable tv. breaking down the monthly bill the cost of the Comcast “land line” (really a VoIP line…Voice Over Internet Protocol line) wasjust $7 p/m. a no brainer.

Thomas D
1 day ago

At $68 a month, i finally dropped the land line. nobody other than telemarketers used it. Kinda like tv.never had cable because they brought it out to us 12 years after the subdivision went in and by then we had used Dish and Direct. When the digital tv came out and we could get 30+ channels we dropped that too. More money in my pocket and not glued to a chair watching senseless crap.

Glenda Alexander
1 day ago

I have had only a cell phone since 1992, when I started living full-time in an RV. At that time, only about 5% of the US population had cell phones.

Neal Davis
1 day ago

We had both a landline and cell phones for about 25 years. But, then we moved to be near our aging parents and had a house built. We decided then to not have a landline installed. It has made local services — plumbers, repairmen, and the like — a bit harder to convince that we are legitimate customers and not spammers, but not enough to add a landline. Recently, my 89-years-of-age mother had her landline number, which she had had since 1953, ported to a Jitterbug flip phone, so even she no longer has a landline.

larry
1 day ago

no, i have not had a land line in decades.
as a truck driver it is not worth the $$ to have one.

Deborah Mason
1 day ago

Where we live in nw Montana cell service is spotty, at best. Without the Wi-Fi cell booster we have no cell service to speak of. The internet to drive the Wi-Fi comes over the phone lines. So we have both. As long as the power is on. When power goes out we swap cordless phone or for old fashioned plug in landline until power is back. Gotta have it for 911.

Last edited 1 day ago by Deborah Mason