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For dog owners: How many words does your “smartest” dog recognize?

Your dog is the smartest dog, isn’t it? They know so many words, commands, they can tell their toys apart, they know when they’re about to have a bath and they know that they’re only allowed on the bed if they’re a “good boy” or “good girl,” right?

Well, sure, your dog is the smartest dog. But so is that person’s dog over there, and the person’s dog residing in the motorhome next to you right now. They’re all the smartest dog!

If you had to guess (or if you can count), how many words does your “smartest” dog know? Tell us in the poll below. Thanks!

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James Foucault
1 month ago

How about our golden retriever that can spell? Spell b-o-n-e and she goes to treat box,spell t-r-u-c-k she goes and sits by the door, spell w-a-l-k and she goes all happy…tail wag, ears up, bark etc.

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RV Staff(@rvstaff)
1 month ago
Reply to  James Foucault

That’s cool, James. And I had a dog that would go to the door and bark three times, for O-U-T. 😀 Have a great day. 🙂 –Diane

Joni Weed
1 month ago

My dogs are trained to compete from a puppy stage. Tsunami, my Lowchen, has championships in breed and two in agility. Plus she competes at high level in obedience, rally, and several other dog performance activities. Her son, Ruger, has the highest AKC trick dog titles and a few from other organizations, plus his agility, obedience. They know the names of all agility obstacles, the rally exercises, the usual tricks at home, basic obedience commands, their toys, and more. So each of them knows more than 200 words. The new Biewer puppy is getting there. In a few months she has learned at least 80 words, many from watching what the other dogs do.

Tom
4 months ago

Our dog understands many more commands than I do 🤣

KellyR
4 months ago

It would not surprise me if our little fur ball understood every word we say, but being a princess just wraps my wife around her little paw.

Neal Davis
4 months ago

Jackson is my wife’s dog. So, I asked her if she thought that he knew more than 50 words. Her speculation was “maybe.” So, I picked the second category. He certainly does not belong in the third category, but may belong in the first (and most popular) category.

Bill
4 months ago

I suspect we all underestimate the intelligences and abilities of dogs. This is evident in the Nova documentary “Bird Brain.” My dog always amazes me with her ability to communicate. Here is what professionals are saying. As for language, the average dog can learn 165 words, including signals, and the “super dogs” (those in the top 20 percent of dog intelligence) can learn 250 words,

Sue
4 months ago

Our three Labs each know at least 50-100 words/cues, maybe more, + a lot of hand signals. Our two pet Labs learned a lot of new words when we were the volunteer puppy raisers for a guide/service dog school with the youngest Lab. They all learned the words for both pet and basic guide/service commands. I think they all understand more of what we say than we realize. And, yeah, they sure know how to tell time, too! (We adopted the guide pup in training when he was career-changed for several minor health and major temperament issues — too low energy and sociable to be a working dog, but makes a fabulous pet and certified therapy dog.)

Bob p
4 months ago

Our ten year old 3 legged Maltese watches TV and moves his mouth as if he is speaking. He may know the script as my wife watches 70 year old reruns of Gunsmoke etc., as many times as he’s seen these shows he probably has memorized the entire series. Lol

Bob p
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob p

Something else about dogs, the “experts” say dogs don’t see in color and that’s BS, our dog has 3 different colored toys just alike except for the color, his favorite is the blue one, he’ll play with the others if he can’t find his blue one but he’ll search for the blue one first.

Ron Lane
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob p

The blue one may have a different odor….one that we humans are unable to detect.

Bill
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob p

Bob, you are right on with the blue color. This is words from a vet. The retina of the eye has two main types of cells—rods, which detect light levels and motion, and cones, which differentiate colors. … Dogs possess only two types of cones and can only discern blue and yellow – this limited color perception is called dichromatic vision.

Joni Weed
1 month ago
Reply to  Bill

That is why when you watch an agility trial you mostly see the obstacles in blue and yellow.

Deborah Mason
4 months ago

I’ve found the more you teach your pets the more they learn & keep learning throughout their lives. Currently our “pound puppies”know the words were use for Rally Obedience, Agility, names of their toys, many foods, and some useful phrases like “not time yet”, “we need to wait for Tom”, “can I have it”, and the very important word “trade”. Use code words for some things so they don’t get excited too soon. And they can communicate choices assigned to my hands & touch the one corresponding to their choice.

Wayne Braxton
4 months ago

These two little wieners of ours are mind readers, not to mention fluent in English comprehension. And, the sniffers they have makes it almost impossible to hide a new toy, their treats or most anything they have no business knowing about. My male gives me 5, maybe 10 minutes after my last drink of coffee then he demands his morning golf cart ride.

Skip
4 months ago

I don’t know if it’s really the words they know. Running beagles for years and dealing with a breed that is stubborn with selective hearing. With that said if an intelligent breed I think it’s the pitch of one’s voice. Talk softly and watch their heads move back and forth, yell and the heads drop with the ears. Talk normal and ears perk up and tail wags. So word recognition I’m not sold on. It’s the same as sheep dogs and cattle dogs. it’s all about the whistle the tone of the pitch of and the succession of the whistling. So again word knowledge doesn’t appear evident. End of the day, their devotion to us with love understand and sensing your moods makes them man or woman’s best friend. Dogs rule!

Ellen L
4 months ago
Reply to  Skip

Two beagles here and we’ve always had beagles. They are spoiled fur-kids. They know lots of words: cookie, out, squirrel, walk, eat, supper, and eat – again because it’s so important to hounds.

Bob
4 months ago

Our Brittany was the most intelligent dog we ever had. I put down 50-100, but I think he knew more than that. We had names for all his toys, probably 30 of them. Yes he was spoiled.
He also knew hand signals and body language.
Young children know much less than that. How many times have you heard them screaming in a store and could not understand the word QUIET when told by their parents?

Traveler
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob

Kids know the word quiet. They are seeking, and getting, attention.

Bob M
4 months ago

My two dogs can tell time. They know when its time to eat or have treats.

David Telenko
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob M

I totally agree our 7 year old Beagle, Daisy will wake up when its snack time. She’s a great alarm clock & tells us when its time for bed!!LOL

Jeb
4 months ago

I don’t know about vocabulary but the dogs I have had always understood intentions and cues better than most humans.

Kurt Shoemaker Sr
4 months ago

Our son and two kids presently are living at our house while he looks for another place. Also, he moved in his 200lb English Mastiff, which could be described as a bear. He understands the basic commands, sit, eat, out. But what my son has a problem with is the fact that I taught him one other command.

Sitting in my lounge chair I will say “Is there anyone who can help me up ?” I don’t care where that dog is in the house, he gets up and walks over to me so I can grab his collar. Then he pulls back to help me get out of my chair. No I don’t need the assistance, but it’s just something we came up with one day while watching TV. His re-enforcement for his assistance is a big hug, a rub on his belly and a trip to the dog treat box.

Admin
RV Staff(@rvstaff)
4 months ago

Cool story (and cool dog), Kurt. Thanks! Have a great day. 😀 –Diane

MN Anon
4 months ago

What’s even more impressive is how our dog recognizes what’s going on without words. For example he knows the difference when we put our shoes to go to the store, water the flowers, take a bike ride, OR take him for a walk.

William DeCoste
4 months ago

Sure, my schnoodle is wicked smart. But….. my teenage granddaughter knows EVERYTHING.

Wayne Braxton
4 months ago

Had a daughter like that years back. I knew nothing, she knew she knew everything. Glad to say that she comes to the old man for advice at times now.