Are RVers friendlier than the general public?

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What do you think, are RVers friendlier than the general public as a whole?

We hear it all the time from our readers — “Oh, RVers are so friendly. You make so many friends.” The RV Industry promotes this idea, too, in its advertising and public relations.

We’re curious what you think and welcome your comments.

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Connie

I find that retired RV’ers can fall one of two ways off the friendly fence:
Either they’re relaxed and happy to be retired, or
They’ve become jaded, and cranky.
Generally though … much friendlier than generations behind us.
(But isn’t that normal….?)
I look forward to BEING one of the relaxed and happy group.

Rick Oerman

Not friendlier, just out and around their camp site and campground a lot more.

Linda

In general most people are friendly anytime. Could it be a combination of, close quarters, less secure accommodations and generally being more relaxed that contributes to the “friendliness” of RVers?

Tom

For the most part I find RVs friendly and easy to talk with. You never know what anyone has gone thru over the day so we are all entitled to a bad day or two.

Eric

I generally find RVers to be pretty friendly, but I have had many good exchanges with folks in store lines, parking lots, or at doors. It’s been my experience if you are open and friendly with others, they’ll reciprocate in kind. A smile and eye contact go a long way.

gerald buscemi

about friendlier rv’ers, you need to be more specific. couples (older-younger, with/without kids), singles (male/female). being a single male, I’ve found the friendliness a lot less than others.

Kevin

We spent the summer in the upper midwest. We found the RVers friendly. The folks in towns and shopping areas seemed friendly also. We all live in contentious times but we are more the same that we are different. People seem as friendly as you are, if you are wary they are, if outgoing (or even a smile) most will smile back and engage in conversation.

Brian

Probably nicer while rv’g. Same as people are nicer in church until they drive out of the parking lot.

Dick and Sandy near Buffalo, NY

As RVers we have been around the lower 48 states twice, traveled much of Canada a few times and to Alaska once. That is a lot of different campgrounds all over North America.

To draw a comparison, walking down a strange street in many of the cities we have visited we would say hello to strangers. Half the time we would get a hello back and half the time we would not get a response. Walking around any campground we have attended at any time of day or night and saying hello to total strangers would get a hello back every time.

That is our experience. I am sure there are other situations. However we believe RVers are much more friendlier.

Bob Godfrey

I wonder if society itself hasn’t changed overall not just RVers or campers. Before TV & air conditioning people would sit on their front porch/stoop and talk with neighbors etc. But with TV & air conditioning in virtually every home, very few actually sit out on the porch and converse unless their is a power failure in the neighborhood then you’ll actually see your neighbors sitting outside and lo and behold they converse!

blt

Are RVers more friendly? This question needs to be in context. A great deal of RVers have taken themselves out of the rat-race of the world. Either they are taking a vacation or they have retired. Without the pressures of a work-a-day life and more time in that particular day in the park/wilderness they have a greater ability to be engaged with others. So I do not believe that the person who is in an RV is a friendlier person, I simply believe they have the atmosphere that frees up their lives to choose to make and be a friend.

David Howard

A lot depends upon where you are. Just last month we suffered a high speed blowout of a trailer tire while in rural Texas. No one was hurt, but for a few hours we were stranded on the side of a 70 mph road with no shoulders. While awaiting help from AAA, I can’t tell you how many good people stopped to offer help and advice. The friendliness and helpfulness of so many good Texas folks was both heartwarming and very welcome, and one of those folks is what led us to a wonderful RV repair dealer in Marble Falls that went above and beyond in helping us get back on the road quickly. The dealer, after we called and explained out plight, remained at his shop hours after normal closing hours to wait for us to arrive. Despite a huge number of RV’s awaiting work, he took our trailer to the top of his list and had us fully repaired and ready to go within one day. In this case, the non RV people were far and away the most helpful I have ever encountered. But I’m not so sure I would have had the same experience in my own backyard of the Midwest.

Karen Barrett

Thoughts from the corner of Hither-N-Yon: Over time, we’ve been in various parts of the country and have seen lots of ‘attitudes’ in play in the “RV World.’ It can depend on a number of factors and runs the gamut of “RV Snobs” to ‘Good Old Folks’ (and everything in between). From work camping in Lander, Wyoming – to military campgrounds, Elks facilities, various public parks to owning lots in Mission, TX-Bowling Green, FL, Polk City, FL – we may not have seen it all, but we’ve ‘seen a lot.’ Just looking at each end of the spectrum, the typical RV-Snob probably paid a lot for the biggest, fanciest rolling palace loaded with things they had/have in previous lifestyle….the average ‘good old foks’ are happy having what they need and some of what they want, but of course have a little envy of the flash/glitter of the 45 foot Prevost (or whatever) nearby – one thing about it, usually doesn’t take long to tell who is friendly and who isn’t… I watch some of the TV shows where people are looking at RVs trying to decide which one to buy–listening to their comments, on what’s in the unit can be telling, listening to their comments on their preferences can be an indicator as well–but one thing for sure, don’t make snap judgements – we’re all just people, and helping each other is a good thing–whether you’re rv-ing or not. (note: in RV, someone can usually always ‘move’ if not compatible with neighbors – not always that easy in sticks/bricks set up)

Kurt

Chuck, you mentioned downloading an e-mail for the first time in your RV and how camping has changed since then. You are spot on. Once we started bringing electronics on-board we started to lose that friendliness with our fellow campers. I’ve been camping since I was a small boy. We didn’t sit inside behind a screen playing a game or watching a movie. We didn’t even bring a TV along. We were out and about having fun with fellow campers. Today you are lucky if your camping neighbor says hello as they leave their RV to get in their vehicle to go somewhere.

HT Morgan

I think they are friendly but I also think that trend is changing. Just like our society in general, the folks in campgrounds are becoming less outgoing. I don’t know all the reasons but I suspect part of it is from the social media and internet. People no longer sit and talk, they just use social media and talk in sound bits. Just go into a restaurant and count the number of people with a phone in their hands. Just my 2 cents worth.

Jeff

It all depends on what part of the country you are in!

Thelma Thomas

We’ve found that RVers are much friendlier than the general population. I think about riding an elevator where eye contact isn’t made, let alone a conversation. While RVing we have made long distance friends just by starting a casual conversation while taking a walk. We’ve learned about the best places to camp by waving as we walk past a campsite and start talking. Some French Canadians tried to communicate and visit with us last winter in Florida when they liked our solar patio torches. Life is good.

Andrew Kapusta, Jr.

In the 30 years of camping, my family has experienced very friendly and helpful RV’ers. There have been times I needed small repairs and my RV neighbor would come to help and offer advice. Other times, suggestions on where to visit family friendly attractions. Generally speaking, each camping trip has been insightful and rewarding. We enjoy our time camping and look forward to the next “greatgetaway”.

Mark

Altough i do think rvers are generally friendlier than the general public, I think your responses would show a direct relationship with the geographical areas of the responders. People in some parts of the country are considerably more helpful and outgoing than other parts. The farther from home you wander, the more apparent it becomes.