Friday, January 28, 2022

MENU

RV fires – Did one happen to you?

By Russ and Tiña De Maris
A recent study by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) could light a match under complacency. The NFPA’s research foundation undertook a study of RV fires occurring in the U.S. over a 10-year period. While RVing is still likely one of the “safest” recreational pursuits, the data from the study proved to be an eye-opener. We’re analyzing the data now, and will have a full story after the turn of the year.

Fires with no exceptions

“Fast” Eddie Maloney on flickr.com

The NFPA study obtained fire statistics for the years 2008 to 2017. During those years, reported RV fires occurred in nearly 6,000 rigs. These ranged from tiny “pop-ups” to sleek Class A units. No type of RV is exempt from the flame. No price range, nor model year, nor manufacturer is spared.

As RVers, we need to know the causes of these tragic RV fires. We need to know, because we need to do all in our power to ensure something like this doesn’t happen to us or our loved ones. Dollar losses are certainly important, but buried in the NFPA report are other “statistics” that translate to something harder to cope with: real people who sustained injuries. Real people – loved ones – who died.

We need your help

As we work our way through the report and come up with advice, we need your help. We’d like to know if you’ve ever been touched by a recreational vehicle fire. Please take a minute to respond to our survey. And if you’ve personally experienced an RV fire, we’d like to hear from you.

If you’ve experienced a recreational vehicle fire, please fill out the form below, and enter “RV Fire” on the subject line.

Click or drag a file to this area to upload.

Related

RVelectricity – Just Ask Mike (J.A.M.): Don’t fight an RV fire!

##RVT1030

Comments

Subscribe
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

6 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Bill
1 month ago

I answered yes, but it wasn’t much of a fire. The little amplifier for the TV antenna wasn’t working, and when I pulled the cover off it flamed up. I smothered it and killed the power, no damage but needed a new amplifier.

Carson Axtell
1 month ago

This is important information. I hope a breakdown of causes and contributing factors is included in the final article (i.e. electrical, propane pilot light, open flame, loose curtains/fabrics, etc.).

DW/ND
1 month ago

Since I started reading this great newsletter – perhaps more than anything else, fires caught my attention. My question has been and remains – “What was the cause?” We lost our home to fire on July 28th 1989 (aluminum wire from the power co. source to the fuse box), so fire is a major concern to us. However, talking about it without the “why and what” factors – just leaves us basically afraid and not educated. I know we watch the basics, no candles, no long sleeves near the propane stove and on and on with the obvious and Mac the Fire Guy‘s reminders. So, I for one really look forward to the results of this study. It is long overdue. Thank you, thank you.

chris
1 month ago

Not in my rig, but I’ve seen one. Right across the road from me a van went up in flames at 1am, apparently due to some slipshod inverter wiring and trying to run an electric heater. Scary as hell for me, must have been a nightmare for him.

Vincee
1 month ago

Isn’t the potential for fire one of the RVIA area of oversight? You have an RV RVIA certified it will add hundreds or into the thousands of dollars to the MSRP which in my opinion is a waste of money. They are no more than an industry group protecting the manufacturers.

tom
1 month ago

Not yet. No open flames in coach. All wiring is proper gauge and terminated correctly. No flammable fluids inside RV.
5 on-hand fire extinguishers.
Get the heck out and let it burn. People and pets first, material stuff last.