Tuesday, September 27, 2022

MENU

New vehicle headlights will cut glare and add safety for drivers and oncoming traffic

If you’re a driver who hates the sight of high-beam headlights coming at you, help may be on the way.

U.S. highway safety regulators are about to allow new high-tech headlights that can automatically tailor beams so they focus on dark areas of the road and don’t create glare.

The advancement is called “adaptive driving beam headlights.” The approval will go into effect when it is published in the Federal Register in the next few days.

The new headlights are already commonly used in Europe and use LED lamps that can focus beams on dark areas such as the driver’s lane and areas along the side of the road. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the new headlights will make it easier to see pedestrians and bicyclists, as well as animals in and along the side of the road.

##RVT041b

Comments

Subscribe
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

4 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
DW/ND
7 months ago

Younger folks obviously don’t understand the recovery time needed by older drivers or persons with light sensitive sight. I finally had to buy those yellow night driving glasses as a way to get home after dark- which is worse from November to March! The glare and the bouncing bright lites from road variations are virtually unbearable. It isn’t from drivers who don’t dim their lites either – the glare is from stock low beam headlites. And how about those “blue” lights? What a great idea – stupid is as stupid does!

It takes substantial time for eyes to recover when going into a very dark environment – talk about driver incapacitation or distracted driving! Now add in ice an some snow or rain too….. This foreign invention will be a welcome first step! (I’ve even written to the State of ND and my reps. about these lights; it’s that critical to me!)

Tommy Molnar
7 months ago

I just think it’s more hi-tech stuff to go wrong. Common courtesy is what’s needed, and in short supply.

Jesse Crouse
7 months ago
Reply to  Tommy Molnar

Trouble is- It ain’t so common anymore.

Ron
7 months ago

It’s about flicking time

Sign up for the RVtravel Newsletter

Your information will *never* be shared or sold to a 3rd party.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Every Saturday and Sunday morning. Serving RVers for more than 20 years.