Visit independent nation Molossia in a tiny piece of Nevada

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By Len Wilcox
WESTERN VIEWS

The West has a long tradition of enjoying the eccentricities of oddball characters – people like Joshua Norton, who declared himself Emperor of the United States in 1859 and was treated with honors by San Francisco citizens for the rest of his life. There’s even a movement today to name the Bay Bridge for him. In that same vein, along comes Kevin Baugh, formerly of Portland, Oregon, and now the President of Molossia.

Hear Len read this essay to you.

In case you never heard of Molossia, it’s one-and-a-third acres of Nevada desert land about 30 miles east of Carson City. President Baugh declared it a micro nation back in the 1990s. He’s built his own little kingdom there, and 33 people claim citizenship – though only 3 live in the Molossia homeland.

President Baugh was interviewed in the web-based travel publication Afar last year. He told the reporter that it was surprisingly easy to create a micro nation; just declare that it exists. The details will follow. Molossia has a flag and its own currency, which is not based on silver or gold, but something really valuable and important: chocolate chip cookie dough. The country also has a bank and a post office, a trading post, and of course a customs shack.


Molossia also has an enemy. It’s currently at war with East Germany, and sees no end to the conflict. The reason it won’t end is, there is no one left in the East German government to negotiate a peace treaty. On the bright side, the President says, its good to have an enemy to blame all your ills and woes on. Doesn’t every government need a scapegoat now and then?

As wacky as it may seem, Baugh isn’t alone in his quest to create a micro nation. There are hundreds of them around the world, and every other year President Baugh organizes a conference that brings 25 to 50 fellow nation builders together to share ideas. They come dressed in glorious state attire, outfitted in whatever they think a nation leader should wear.

One thing does make President Baugh unique at these events: he usually is the only micronation President. Most other micronations have kings, queens, dukes or emperors. Baugh isn’t particularly fond of royalty, so he chose to be President and Dictator.

You can visit Molossia. Visitors are welcome on specified days during the summer months only, and only by reservation. You can check their website at http://www.molossia.org to schedule a visit. And don’t forget your passport.


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Katalin H Heymann
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Katalin H Heymann

Just plain crazy or a case of what are these people thinking. It could be like the cosplay conventions where people do it for entertainment or really crazy like the people who create costumes as animals. I guess it takes all kinds including crazy.

Len Wilcox
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Len Wilcox

Yes, it takes all kinds!

Patrick Granahan
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Patrick Granahan

Sounds like a great way to avoid United States Taxes….great fun !!!
I wonder if I could pull this off with one acre in the Great Smoky Mountains of
North Carolina !! Name it “Moonshine Nation”…..put up a boarder wall without
needing Nancy’s approval !!!

Len Wilcox
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Len Wilcox

Well, the IRS isn’t known for its sense of humor, so they might not agree you could avoid paying taxes. But who knows?

John Karlson
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John Karlson

Re Molossia-be interested to know if the big “boss” pays his US Federal Income Tax, and is registered as a “firm” with the Nevada Tax Commission. Why would someone spend time, energy and money to do something like this. Reminds me of the old signs on Route 66 noting the giant creator for exhibit just down the road – see it for a quarter.

Len Wilcox
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Len Wilcox

Remember “The Thing?” and the big billboards hundreds of miles apart advertising it? All those trips my parents took back in the ’60s with me in tow – my dad would never stop to see “The Thing” so I never did find out what it was. But I still wonder – it’s the itch not scratched!