Saturday, September 25, 2021

MENU

Will you be comfortable shaking hands with strangers when the pandemic ends?

We’ve all grown accustomed to meeting new people and saying “Nice to meet you!” from a safe six-foot distance. There’s the occasional elbow bump, but for the most part, we’ve kept to ourselves this past year.

Once this is all over (or as over as it’s going to get…), will you be comfortable shaking hands with strangers again? Will you be hesitant at all, or will you not think twice about it? We’re curious to know.

Please tell us in the poll below. Hopefully, if we ever meet you in the future we can shake your hand!

Comments

Subscribe
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

69 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Dave J
6 months ago

Shaking hands, back home that’s how we seal a deal. Signatures can be copied but a solid handshake is assumed to truly indicate one’s intentions.

D C
6 months ago

I am a medical person. I am okay with handshakes, but I wash my hands about 1,000 times a day and use hand sanitizer frequently in between. There is no such thing as germ free in every day living. We are surrounded by germs 24/7. Not all of germs are bad. We need some of them to stay healthy. Killing off the good ones can cause serious problems.

Bob Weinfurt
6 months ago

I feel that we’ll get a grip on this pandemic, but it will be at least several decades before Covid is completely eradicated, if even by then. Once we get the upper hand on this, I’ll go back to shaking hands some of the time. Lots of variables to consider.

KellyR
6 months ago

I will continue to do as I have in the past. “Never shake hands at the dump station.”

Grant Graves
6 months ago

Maybe we should learn some alternatives for greeting from other cultures. I prefer a bow of the head and a smile.

Scooter
6 months ago

I have not stopped shaking hands if the other person is good with it. I also either wash my hands or use alcohol on them afterwards.

Snayte
7 months ago

I have never liked shaking hands or hugging people that are not my immediate family. So no.

Tom
7 months ago

Never really a hand shaker, and less now.

Rich
7 months ago

there were lots of bugs that could make us sick out there before the pandemic and the same will be true when it ends. yes, i’ll shake hands. NO FEAR!

Last edited 7 months ago by Rich
Roy Davis
7 months ago

I am considered high risk but never stopped shaking hands nor giving hugs. I refuse to live my life in fear of what might happen. I can’t remember the last time I had a cold or the flu. I believe in washing my hands, which I was taught as a wee lad. I also drink lots of water, 3 or more 20 oz. containers a day. The only other thing I drink is 2-3 cups of coffee a day and occasionally a glass of red wine. My wife and I have been exposed to Covid a couple times and did isolate but never showed any signs of it.

John
7 months ago
Reply to  Roy Davis

I agree. Couldn’t have said it any better.

Greg Thompson
7 months ago

I stopped shaking hands in May 2008 after my first stem cell transplant. I am imuno suppressed and have bumped hands since then if someone offers their hand to shake. Nobody has ever said anything or refused.
And I’ve been wearing N95 masks where appropriate as well. I received my education on the subject when I was in isolation for 5 weeks in the hospital, not from Facebook or a “news” channel on TV.
Call me crazy but I’ll stick with advice from the medical professionals.

Billy
7 months ago

Maybe it’s just me, but the polls aren’t showing up on mobile. Safari browser on iPhone.

dcook
7 months ago

No more hand shaking for me, hand shaking is the best way in the world to spread every kind of crud that is out there. I will also continue to wear a mask and wash hands often.

Bill
7 months ago
Reply to  dcook

Me too!

Chris Mead
7 months ago

I have no issue with it. There has always been flu and always will be. Good hygiene (wash hands before you eat, after going to the bathroom, etc.) is always necessary regardless.

Marc
7 months ago

I have remained comfortable shaking hands throughout COVID. If the other person is comfortable shaking then so am I.

Donald N Wright
7 months ago

Why is a wedding ring on the right hand? I guess I am behind the times again.

D C
7 months ago

Person may have been married in one of several European countries, such as Norway, where they wear wedding rings on the right hand rather than the left. Or, the pic may be flipped.

Chris Mead
7 months ago
Reply to  D C

Germany as well

D C
6 months ago
Reply to  Chris Mead

Yep.

D C
6 months ago
Reply to  D C

I also later remembered it used to be a custom in the US (as well as other countries) for someone widowed to move their ring to their right hand. My Grandmother did that when my Grandfather died. She’d had the ring on her left had for almost 50 years. The indentation it put in her left ring finger never did go completely away even though she lived another 20 years.

WEB
6 months ago

It may not be a wedding ring…. :-/

D C
6 months ago
Reply to  WEB

That too.

Glenda Alexander
7 months ago

I do virtual handshakes (clasping my own hands together) and virtual hugs — with a smile on my face.

Irv
7 months ago

One thing we’ve learned from COVID is that wearing masks and not shaking hands, etc. is a great way to control colds and flu.

Glenn
7 months ago
Reply to  Irv

You just can’t fix ____. Fill in the blank.

John
7 months ago
Reply to  Glenn

Typical reply to a contrary opinion. How about providing some counter evidence. It’s called discussion.

WEB
6 months ago
Reply to  John

This is a comments section, wait for the forum page if you want a discussion as most will not return here to keep a ‘discussion’ going. Oh, BTW, the OP (David) did not provide a link for evidence either.

Last edited 6 months ago by WEB
Boltman
7 months ago
Reply to  Glenn

You can’t fix sheeple who still believe masks work!
Wash your hands, don’t touch your eyes, distance yourself from others if you are afraid of what they might have. And throw your useless masks away.
And quit believing everything Dr. Fauchi says he’s not seen a patient in person in decades…

Joe
7 months ago
Reply to  Irv

I agree, research the size of a exhaled breath molecule, a sneeze and a cough and you will find that a cloth mask is virtually useless even if using a double mask. A correctly fitted N-95 mask is way better, a KN-95 is also better than a cloth mask but not as good as a N-95. If one sneezes or coughs with any mask it pushes any mask away from the face and the molecules escape. A cloth mask is like trying to stop a mosquito with a chain link fence.

Mike
7 months ago
Reply to  Joe

not really. Look at the specs on a N95 mask. It is rated 95% down to .3 micron. The chinese virus is .07 to .14 microns (maybe 70% effective at best). It means anything down to .3 microns 5% will get thru. So if there are 100 viruses of .3 microns, 5 will get thru.

Roy Christensen
7 months ago
Reply to  Irv

When asked on their website if masks are necessary, here is the response from Johns Hopkins: Yes, if you are in a public place where you will encounter other people, you should wear a mask. Face masks help contain respiratory droplets that can transmit SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, from people who do not know they have the virus.
For example, when inside an office, store, restaurant or school, or when on public transportation, you should wear a mask. The only exceptions are times when you are alone or with your family, such as if you are in your office with the door closed or in your car. 
When you are outdoors walking or exercising near others, it is also important to wear a mask. 
At Johns Hopkins Medicine, we currently require everyone entering our facilities to wear a mask, except for children under age 2.

Bill
7 months ago
Reply to  Irv

I think your facts are not facts. Anyone who is interested can query thru the Johns Hopkins website for the true info.

Admin
Kim Christiansen (@imkimc)
6 months ago
Reply to  Irv

Ahem…
A few folks posted comments saying masks don’t work and misrepresenting research on masks. A couple of others called them out in unkind ways. And finally, someone decided that they needed to give us a science lesson (without actually using science) on masks and the virus.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again. You are MORE than welcome to express your opinion and your personal preference for wearing or not wearing a mask.

BUT, you are NOT welcome to spread bad information based on your personal beliefs or bias. We would not tolerate someone posting unsafe advice in the comments regarding operating an RV or RV safety and we won’t tolerate it with respect to the ongoing pandemic.

And when someone does express his/her opinion on whether or not to wear a mask, if you feel compelled to comment, you can disagree with them RESPECTFULLY.
No name calling, no shaming, no derogatory comments.

Irv’s comment does not cite science, so it’s his opinion.

Thanks,
Kim

Larry
7 months ago

When the pandemic ends?… hate to point it out but this is not going to end anytime in the near future… with new mutations showing up it is going to be years and only when most of the world… not just the North American continent… is vaccinated… so get used to masks, washing your hands, social distancing and maybe even yearly vaccines just like the flu shots…

Bill
7 months ago
Reply to  Larry

Agreed!

Bob M
7 months ago

I’ve shaken hands in the past, but was always uncomfortable shaking hands during the Catholic mass. You’d see people cough in the hand, blow their nose in a hankerchief or rub their noise. Than later want to shake your hand. Or have a person sit next to you that stunk or smelled like he was smoking. Don’t plan on shaking in the future.

Follow us!

31,714FansLike
26,456FollowersFollow
66,000SubscribersSubscribe