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RV Review: No Boundaries 10.6 travel trailer – A lot in a little!

It’s not often that an RV gets me to stop in my tracks, but as I was zipping around the campground on my new eBike (review coming next Saturday!), I spotted a No Boundaries 10.6. I slammed on my brakes to go talk to the owners and get a better look.

After you’ve seen as many RVs as I have, you start to make assumptions – which is never a good thing. In this case, I assumed the No Bo 10.6 was little more than a squared-off teardrop trailer – but it’s a lot more than that. 

No Bo – No Boundaries

The No Boundaries brand of travel trailers is a relatively new name in the industry. It was started by Forest River in 2017 as 2018 model year products. The entire line is relatively small trailers that are specifically designed to appeal to adventure-seeking travelers and featuring things like high ground clearance with aggressive tires and racks available for things like bicycles and kayaks. 

While these have been on my radar, I’m really surprised I haven’t written about anything in the No Boundaries line until now.  

A lot of surprises in the No Bo

What stopped me in my tracks was the outdoor kitchen on this trailer, first of all. That kitchen is essentially on a large drawer-type arrangement. It consists of a 12-volt cooler and a two-burner propane stove sitting atop a metal box. There’s even a bottle opener on it. 

At the back of that drawer is a small lockable compartment that you might think of as a gun safe, perhaps. When I first saw this I thought “how could you use this if you were inside the camper.” But there’s access to it from inside, as well, through a removable floor cover in the hanging closet. 

But let’s not get all crazy and head inside yet – there’s plenty to see out here. 

One of those is a cabinet just to the left and above the kitchen that opens up and has hanging storage for things like spices. This could reasonably be your pantry, so you have a really nice outdoor kitchen. 

There is also a spray port to which a curly hose and sprayer attach. There’s a “dog bowl” sink in the compartment, which means that it’s essentially only a bowl, no drain. You just dump it out when done. 

Also, that spray port uses the trailer’s pressurized water system but only for cold water. There is no water heater on this trailer. 

The friendly couple who had the No Bo trailer were there enjoying their evening sitting under what is called a bat wing awning. It’s called this because it sort of unfolds and looks like a bat wing when opened. 

The awning covers the camp side of the trailer, including the kitchen and also the rear of the trailer. 

Small “tables” can be used as steps on the No Bo, or vice versa

They also were using small tables which sort of hang from the tires of the trailer. They are sturdy enough to be steps to get up on the roof. 

On either side of the trailer is a passenger door into the trailer. They’re sort of like you might expect in a teardrop. But there’s also a large ramp at the back of the trailer for loading ATVs or gear of whatever type you want. 

This isn’t a huge toy hauler, mind you, at just 13’ 10” in overall length and only 7’5” in total towing height. But it does offer 5’ 5” of interior height, so you could fit in some quads or other ATVs. With almost 2,000 pounds of cargo carrying capacity, it’ll take ’em. 

There’s also a screen that keeps the bugs out of the trailer if you choose to leave the rear ramp door down. 

Maybe I’m biased … wait, I am. But there is no built-in stereo on this rig. Instead, Forest River includes a JBL Flip portable Bluetooth speaker. This is how I accomplish the audio in my own trailer even though it came with the horrible, horrible, horrible iRV 34 audiophile suicide inducer. 

Heat for this trailer is accomplished through a heat strip on the air conditioner and, yep, it has one of those as well. I wonder if you could hang meat in this rig when the AC is fully pumping. That’s because even a small 10,500 BTU AC unit is going to be more than enough for a space of this size. But the unit you get, should you choose AC, is a 13,500 BTU model. 

Second floor

You can get the No Bo with a second-story or roof-top tent arrangement which is specifically designed for No Boundaries trailers. This one had it and the couple offered to show me around their upstairs, but I declined. I’m not much of a ladders person. 

But the tent, from what I’ve seen in the pictures I shared with you here, can sleep two individuals. It has some storage pockets inside as well. 

This small, 1,763-pound trailer that you can tow with many, many mid-size SUVs, can literally sleep four people. That’s rather impressive. 

More roof stuff

Their trailer was also outfitted with the roof-top kayak rack. So they could not only sleep up there, but there was a kayak up there as well. Oftentimes one of the biggest challenges any adventure-seeking RVer faces is where to put adventure-focused gear. This trailer addresses that. 

What’s inside the No Bo

The interior of this trailer is just as innovative as the exterior, to me. 

There are two folding cushions that might be likened to a futon. Each of those will fold up to form a place to sit or fold out to be a place to sleep. 

When both sides are folded out, the space is essentially equivalent to a queen-sized bed. 

The interesting thing, to me, about this trailer when it’s folded into sit mode is that there’s a storage well smack dab in the middle of the trailer. It becomes a foot well when you’re sitting here. So you really do have a comfortable place to sit and a comfortable place to sleep. 

When seated, each side has a flip-up table, so now you’ve got dining down. 

Behind the cushions, which are fully removable, are two larger storage compartments with netted fronts on them. There’s also a hanging closet for maybe shirts. Your ball gown isn’t going to fit in here, unfortunately. 

The floor of that cabinet is the one that has access to the locking compartment at the tip of the sliding kitchen drawer that I mentioned earlier. 

What it’s not

I’m really amazed at how much the No Bo has going for it and how much thinking went into the trailer itself. The outdoor kitchen is brilliant, I love the pantry compartment, and the step tables that fit over the tires are a great idea. Yes, I’ve seen them in the aftermarket. But it’s nice to see a manufacturer step up and do something that hasn’t been seen in dozens of other trailer designs. 

But as much as there is, there are also a few things that aren’t here – like a toilet or shower. Yes, the trailer has a 30-gallon fresh water tank and water pump, but it does not have a water heater. 

Adventure-seeking travelers are probably already well aware of the external showers that can be packed along and use on-board propane for hot water. There are also plenty of choices of portable toilets for those that want one of those, too.

Where I saw this trailer was at a KOA, so showers and toilets were handled by the park. The trailer I saw, which shared the campsite with a four-wheel-drive SUV, was being enjoyed by relatively young travelers. So they probably aren’t as concerned by midnight bathroom breaks as some more experienced travelers. 

A few dislikes

Lest I sound like I’m running out and placing an order for one of these, there were a few things I didn’t like about it. 

First of all, that spiffy cabinet that serves as a pantry also protrudes into the cabin of the trailer. If my math is correct, that will find someone’s head at the precise moment in the middle of the night they are most proficient with foul language. 

No heater in the No Bo

You may have correctly deduced that, unless you opt for the air conditioner, you’re not getting a heater of any sort. This trailer is pretty well insulated for something that might be cross-shopped by teardrop prospects. But, still, no heater would be a bummer. Furthermore, even if you do have the heat strip, that means you need a pretty sufficient source of electrical power (30-amp service to the trailer). But whole idea of this trailer is to go where power isn’t, in my thinking. 

Of course, there are plenty of alternatives, including products from Mr. Buddy and such. This trailer has vent doors due to its being a toy hauler of sorts. 

In summary

It’s quite apparent that there were truly adventure-seekers in the design process of this trailer. There are so many thoughtful points to touch on in such a small package, and I count myself as impressed by this rig. It seems to have also found its target pretty accurately based on the number of YouTube videos about it, as well. 

My thanks to Cheyenne Camping Center in Walcott, IA, for use of their photos with this review. 

Tony comes to RVTravel having worked at an RV dealership and been a life long RV enthusiast. He also has written the syndicated Curbside column about cars. You can find his writing here and at StressLessCamping where he also has a podcast about the RV life with his wife. 

These RV reviews are written based on information provided by the manufacturers along with our writer’s own research. We receive no money or other financial benefits from these reviews. They are intended only as a brief overview of the vehicle, not a comprehensive critique, which would require a thorough inspection and/or test drive.

Got an RV we need to look at? Contact us today and let us know in the form below – thank you!

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REVIEW OVERVIEW

Design/thinking
Cargo carrying
Pantry box protruding inside
No standard heater

SUMMARY

The Forest River No Boundaries 10.6 is a fairly small trailer that has a lot of usability inside and out.

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Julie
28 days ago

Nice reviewing! I’ve always been intrigued by off-road campers, having a Jeep ourselves. The No-Bo campers are very versatile and this model with the ramp and screens is probably one of the more appealing layouts. Aside from the no hot water or actual heater aspect, the one thing that bothers me is the lack of windows. Yes I’m aware that would make it less efficient but if you’re outdoor enthusiasts, being able to look out at the surroundings is part of the beauty of camping.