RV Tire Safety: Tire valve core torque tool recommendation

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By Roger Marble
I have mentioned valve cores in a number of posts, including offering some advice on how and why you should avoid over-tightening the core here. I have a tire valve core torque tool recommendation.

Last week, I learned about a low-cost tool that I feel I can endorse, as I purchased and tested this tool and was pleased with the results. This is essentially a “clicker” type torque tool. You tighten the valve core in a smooth twist and it will click and release when the core is tight.

Using my calibrated In-Oz (inch-ounce) torque wrench, I confirmed the Slime unit worked at 3.5 In-Oz, which is in the range of 2 – 5 In-Oz as specified by the The Tire & Rim Association (website not secure), the organization that publishes dimensional specifications for tires, wheels and valves as used world-wide.

It’s the Slime Part # 20178.  I got mine at a local auto parts store, but I see it listed as available at a number of stores and online, including at Amazon.

 

Read more from Roger Marble on his blog at RVtiresafety.net or on RVtravel.com.

 ##RVT977m

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Impavid
4 months ago

I’m not suggesting for one second that torqueing every nut, bolt and screw (or tire valve) is not a good idea, but I would suggest a lot of us readers never owned a torque device for most of out lives. I own 1/4″, 3/8″ & 1/2″ torque wrenches going up to 250 ft lbs (my Ford F350 calls for 165 ft lbs on the lug nuts) and use them occasionally, except lug nuts which I do faithfully. But really, you can go overboard with this stuff. I use the analogy of emptying your black water tank and wearing a hazmat suit. Sure it might be a good idea but didn’t we all change a tire back in the 60s with just a wheel wrench and the tire never fell off. Just sayin’…..

Roger Marble
4 months ago
Reply to  Impavid

I understand and agree. However with the advent of TPMS I am seeing reports of a few tire failures that can be traced to faulty valve cores. The TPMS depresses the core and in a few cases the core does not properly close when the TPMS is removed when the RV is stored for the winter. So now some need to replace the core. Others have discovered a leaking core and mistakenly think that an extra strong twist will stop the leak as it often does with the garden hose. The difference is that the garden hose opens and closes based on the tightness of the valve. Tire valve cores assembly do not have any adjustment for open or closed so when someone over-tightens the core assembly as seen in this picture in this blog post they sometimes end up splitting the valve core seal (black item in the picture). Torque wrenches for lug nuts are an item that many RV owners ( Trailers, Class-B & C) should own so they can properly check their lug nuts. This little tool may be of help for some.