newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Darwin Michielsen

If they quit paying millions of dollars to the presidents of these companies and gave the factory worker a little more, maybe the factory worker would care more about his job and do better work.

Bill Johnson

As for good work habits who is responsible? Growing up we knew that we had to get up and go to school and later when we had jobs we also knew that we had to go to work, every day. This is how my parents brought us and it was not option you knew that you were going to school and work.
As for the drug testing, there are a lot of people who use pot, both young and old. It may well be a lot more then we know. I personally know a number who use pot every day and you wouldn’t know it unless the tested them. They work every day and do well. As for the other drugs, people who use then need help. If they don’t get help there will not be a happy ending. Help not punishment.

Rod Dyer

RE: Lack of employees with work ethics and clean of drugs; Sadly, all I can think of is, “Who is John Galt?”

John Goodell

Mark Polk’s RV Tech Tips the week titled “Things to check when towing a dinghy” is good advice and should be applied to ANY towing. After assorted towing misadventures with my 5th wheel camper over the past 4 years and 60,000 miles, I would advise anyone going cross-country to take Mark’s advice further and install a tire pressure monitoring system and and get a laser thermometer. Do the inspection as per Mark at every stop you make. Pay particular attention to the hitch and trailer tires, and ‘shoot’ the temps on the tires and wheel hubs. You can avoid a blowout with all the collateral damage by watching for slow leaks and unexplained temperature elevations. You may also be able to avoid a burnt out wheel bearing by watching the wheel hub temps. I’ve had all of these. There’s not much you can do to avoid a tire puncture, but the TPMS will alert you immediately.

G. A. Smith

Has anyone thought of creating a “RVB&B” as in AirB&B?
Perhaps there are homeowners that are willing to allow RV’ers to
park in their yard for one or two nights for a reasonable price when campgrounds are full.

David Vallerga

There is a difference between the problems manufacturers have been having with construction and warranty service.

My 2016 Roadtrek had some problems, just like the problems that everyone else is having. Roadtrek has instituted a full 6 (Yes, SIX) year warranty. This is not a service plan it is an actual factory warranty. And they have been really impressive in honoring it. Twice they sent someone to my home so that they could work on it without inconveniencing me. Twice they flew someone out from the factory to a nearby dealer to work on some of the particularly complex systems. I am impressed and delighted with the unit.

Bob Hartley

So discouraging reading and watching RV videos about the new RV’s parts failing or a tire blowing after driving off the RV Co. lot. Kinda takes the air out of the let’s get more stuff “Made in America” goal. Nice to know there are openings for qualified RV workers but sad that the reliable, qualified worker willing to do a good day’s work is difficult to find today.

Wanting a Class C unit to replace my 2013 Keystone Hornet Hideout 26B in a year or so I will be buying a used unit and hoping I can inspect the important things like rotting wood etc. and not get lulled into the “wow how good condition the sofa, galley items and bath looks” items on the checklist. My trailer option to RV’ING using my 2015 Silverado 1500 is not the fanciest but let’s me disconnect, drive to other places avoiding dragging a vehicle behind a Motorhome. Now I am starting to worry about my trailer tires blowing out, 3 years and counting. Even the tire makers can’t always make a good trailer product anymore. Oh well, will keep looking for more new RV videos and adding to my knowledge.

John Hilley

I’m interested in an RV owners advocacy group. It could make a huge difference.

Steve Rosenlund

Perhaps the RV mfg industry needs to raise their pay scale. The difference between a $12 hr worker and a $15 hr worker is substntial and would be recovered by the increased production and reliability. If workers have to choose between burgers or assembly lines, the burger hours are more flexible and they can eat for free. At $18 hr people would be competeing for these jobs. I am constantly repairing my 2006 Gearbox 5th wheel toyhauler. If I were not handy I couldn’t afford to full time RV. God bless You Tube, I can find out how to fix anything on there. Everytime I have to replace something I upgrade the quality so I don’t have to do it again. Thanks for newsletter.

Alex

Nothing wrong with profit. Greed, on the other hand, is undermining our society and culture. Witness Enron; $600 epipens; Bernie Madoff; fraudulent mortgages; the list is endless. Ray Kroc, creator of McDonalds, said “if you can’t measure it, don’t do it.” The RV industry as a whole is indeed measuring what they do, however, they’re measuring trivialities rather than outcomes. As example from the Soviet Union comes to mind. The success of glass manufacturing plants was measured by the area of glass needed for windows. To meet the goal, it was cheaper to make very thin glass and managers were rewarded for doing so. Unfortunately, it was so thin that half of it broke during delivery. On my motor home, I’m sure someone was rewarded for minimizing units of plastic molding concealing attachment seams. Too bad it shrinks with lower temperatures AND the body paint no longer aligns with the moldings. One of many examples on my $100,000+ RV. I’m certain the Purchasing department was rewarded for saving 42.5 cents per unit produced.

To Warren Buffet and other captains of the RV industry, on your next management “retreat” at a plush resort, please consider the proverb “penny wise pound foolish.” To emphasize prearrange for the attendees toilet paper to be from the lowest bidder and make the roll 1/2 the normal size. Then announce a bonus awarded to the retreat coordinator for doing such a great job and exceeding all expectations. The reaction will be a case study worthy of Harvard Business School.

Don F

We belong to Escapees RV club; you may argue it’s not non-profit, but they are an advocacy group for us! They breath, eat and live as a support group for RV’ers, both full and part time. That’s my vote!

Patricia Purtell

Your editorial regarding the slipshod workman ship and poor quality of recently made RV’s: companies are claiming they can not get good workers (because of applicants failing drug tests)and therefore they don’t have enough workers. I believe the truth probably lies in their desire for a larger profit margin. They are USING INFERIOR MATERIALS and rushing their FEW employees through the manufacturing process. Since this does seem to effect all the companies they should all be willing to admit that to make something good takes time. BUT profit is king not reputation.

Grant Carter a/k/a Turnip Truck Driver.

Chuck,

Congrats and best wishes for your transition to full timing.

Your promotion idea for an advocacy non-profit will be well received in our present vacumm..

May I suggest a coverage article for class action suits…. are they beneficial or a waste of time?

John Holdos

Hi Chuck,
Count me in for your non-profit RV association. What can i do to help? We are RVers and travel in a 2015 motorhome which took a year to get the problems resolved. I am retired and held many positions within Mack Trucks Inc. from a Shop Engineer in assembly to Manager of International Service Operations to my last position Manager of Customer Service and Product Service Training. I remember when “Built Like A Mack Truck” meant something.