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Lee
3 years ago

When are you going to update us on the Norcold refrigerator class action suit?

Lee Ensminger
3 years ago

Chuck, PLEASE stop running that “tire tip” on “aging tires” from Sharon Brown! Her credentials for saying all tires should be dumped after 4 1/2 years seem to be that she has [1] Attended a couple of training sessions at an RV show, [2] Read newsletters like yours where people who have no industry experience or credentials can submit posts and/or “tips,” and [3] Reading forums, where anyone can post anything as long as they don’t violate the moderator’s idea of decency. CAN you ruin tires in 4 1/2 years? Certainly. But to make a blanket statement, without any evidence or testing to back it up, which you then print-giving it implied worth-is wrong. There’s a little company out there-Michelin-who I’m guessing has done perhaps a small amount of scientific tire testing. They say that with proper care, tires can last 10 years. My personal experience with my DP motorhome with Michelins is that my rear tires are now 12 years old and in fine shape. We also have a 6K lb. Travel Trailer which is pulled by a 2006 GMC Sierra with Goodyear Wranglers, the original equipment tires. In 2014, they completed a 17,500 mile trip in the lower 48, Canada and Alaska. We just completed a 4,500 mile trip to Colorado and Arizona on those same tires that are now 10 years old. However, you don’t see me encouraging everyone to do that, just as you shouldn’t publish blanket statements by someone no more qualified than me that tires are junk at 4 1/2 years! Care for your tires-keep them out of the sun [covered or garaged] and properly inflated-and monitor their condition. That will serve you better than an arbitrary number.

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Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
3 years ago
Reply to  Lee Ensminger

Lee, with all due respect, Sharon is entitled to her opinion. Frankly, your statement that your tires, at age 12, are “in fine shape,” is not true. At that age, nearly everyone in the industry I know says a tire is way beyond its safe life. Even if they appear perfectly fine, they have deteriorated internally. I am no expert so can’t say any more with authority. I hope our tire expert Roger Marble will weigh in here. He spent his career with Firestone, in part researching and testing tires. Most everyone I know who is familiar with tires says 6-7 years is about right for a tire’s life before sending them out to pasture. You are right to take good care of your tires, but there is nothing you can do to keep a tire from becoming dangerous at 12 years. Roger Marble has talked about this from time to time at his fine blog https://rvtiresafety.com .

Here’s an article on our website about this:
https://www.rvtravel.com/rv-tires-how-old-is-too-old/

Roger Marble
3 years ago
Reply to  Lee Ensminger

I recently did two posts on my blog RVTireSafety specifically on tire age Sept 26 and part 2 on Oct 6. One important thing to consider is that the expected “life” for tires in Motorhome application is about twice as long as in trailer application. A major reason for this difference is not a function of tire brand or size but is due to the unique side loading observed with towables. Even trailers can have significant variation with single axle units getting significantly different [performance as tandem and triple axle units. Again more variation that a simple “X number of years” can address. Beyond the simple answer of “You should replace your tires after X years” I tried to provide some information so people have a better understanding for the wide range in tire life is due to tire to tire product variation so I included some links on how tires are made.
Yes Sharon has developed her idea on tire life from collecting information. Her suggestion of 4-1/2 years is not out of line for many trailer owners.BUT I prefer to provide some qualifiers when I make statements about tire life or performance as I have learned that few people really understand the complex nature of tire durability.

Steve
3 years ago

The boondocking with Dave segment is a good example of why people resent camping pet owners. He claims to open his door and let his dog go do its business. Which means he rarely cleans up after the dog. Its owners like him that make it difficult for us responsible pet campers and results in us being charged extra for our pets. I really resent that. Of course I hate stepping in his dogs droppings.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
3 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Oh, Steve, you really need to lighten up. Dave usually camps miles from the nearest other camper or even person, in the middle of nowhere. The next time someone shows up anywhere near where he camps any dog poop will have long turned to dust, and twenty coyotes will have come by the meantime to do their thing. If Dave were talking about camping in an RV park or public campground, I know he would clean up after his pet. And, Dave was not doing a video on being a responsible pet owner. It had nothing to do with the subject matter. How can you say “he rarely cleans up after the dog.” You don’t know that! — Chuck, editor

Carol Storts
3 years ago

Hi Chuck; I try to make many of my Amazon purchases through you, however I often leave it in my basket, close out Amazon and go back later to either continue shopping or complete my purchase. Often I just open my Amazon app to do this. Are you still getting credit for the purchases that I added through your site? Thank you.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
3 years ago
Reply to  Carol Storts

Hi Carol. First, thanks so much for thinking of us when doing your shopping at Amazon.com. I think we are probably getting credit for your purchases. The statistics we receive show the items sold, but do not identify who bought them. All I know is that the income has been a big help to us. Again, thank you so much for doing your Amazon shopping through us, and for taking the time to ask us about this! — Chuck

Gene Bjerke
3 years ago

You frequently list sales increases or decreases for many types of RVs, but you never include statistics for Class B motorhomes. One would get the impression that they are the embarrassing poor cousins of the RV world.

Admin
Chuck Woodbury (@chuck)
3 years ago
Reply to  Gene Bjerke

Gene, we do mention sales of Class B motorhomes, but not as often as Class A’s and C’s. Three reasons: 1. Class B stats are not made available to us as often. 2. Class B’s are a small part of the total RV market, and 3. Class B owners make up a small percentage of our audience. So while we do cover Class B topics including stats, we don’t do so as often as with the other RVs.

Don I magel
3 years ago

I appreciate your weekly newsletter. thanks.
IT has been helpful many times.

Bill McFarlin
3 years ago

I read the article about the toilet lift. My comment is that although this modification may make it easier to get up off the toilet, it changes the body geometry while using the toilet. This change in body geometry may result in more problems with constipation. Some health care professionals are pointing to trend of highers toilets as being related to the increase in cases of constipation.