RV Daily Tips Newsletter 1017

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Issue 1017• December 12, 2018

Welcome to another fabulous edition of RVtravel’s Daily Tips newsletter. Here, you’ll find helpful RV-related, and small-space living, tips from the pros, travel advice, road trip stops, a handy website of the day, our favorite RVing related products, and of course, a good laugh. Thanks for joining us. We appreciate your readership.

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QUICK TIPS

Protect outdoor RV power cords with the upside-down bucket mod

Photo by Farm Journal

Here’s a very inventive solution that fixed this problem entirely for just a few dollars. All that is needed for this RV power cord mod is a bucket that is wide enough to house the RV power cord electrical connection as shown in the picture. Make two holes directly across from each other near the bottom. Be sure to make them large enough so a cord connection can fit through them. Then simply thread the two ends of the RV power cord together inside the bucket and flip it over so the bottom of the bucket protects the connection like an umbrella. The RV power cord will now stay suspended off the ground and protected from water.
— From doityourselfRV.com

Keep your furnace off – but don’t freeze your water lines

Joseph writes to those who use auxiliary electric or propane heaters, keeping the RV furnace turned off: “If you want to run portable heaters but worry about your basement water lines freezing, just put a couple of 100 watt light bulbs in the area. I can run an extension cord from each side and then to the pedestal via my sewage hose opening. The coldest I did this is 24 degrees for a few days and everything was nice and warm. Just use regular light bulbs that are getting harder to find!” Thanks, Joseph! And here are some of the “real thing” light bulbs, rated for rough service from Amazon.



Goodread’s top books of 2018:


MORE QUICK TIPS

Stop refrigerator item “tip-overs”

Does stuff roll around in your reefer while rolling down the road? Camco thinks it’s got the answer with their “44033 RV Fridge Braces” that keep food from sliding. A pair will set you back a ten-dollar bill, but some clever do-it-yourselfers may be able to create something that will work as well. You can buy the Camco ones from Hannah RV.

Earn a few bucks on the road

If you’re a skilled laborer sell your skills on the road. You can offer your services on Craigslist for the area you’re visiting in.
–From RV Living Full Time: 100+ Amazing Tips, Secrets, Hacks & Resources to Motorhome Living

Do you have a tip? Send it to Russ (at) rvtravel.com



WEBSITE OF THE DAY

AlaskaPlanning the great Alaska road trip by RV

If you’re headed to Alaska in 2019, Gone With the Wynns has put together an informative article and helpful road trip plan – they’ve done all the hard work for you. If you do plan a trip to Alaska, can you invite the RVtravel staff along? We’d love to join. Wink. 

Check out the long list of great RVing-related websites from RVtravel.com.



LEAVE HERE WITH A LAUGH

This Golden Retriever howls at a passing ambulance. He’s got it down! Click the image to play the video. 

Today’s Daily Deals at Amazon.com
Best-selling RV products and Accessories at Amazon.com
. UPDATED HOURLY.


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RV Daily Tips Staff

Editor and Publisher: Chuck Woodbury. Managing editor: Diane McGovern. Staff writer: Emily Woodbury. Contributing writers: Russ De Maris, Bob Difley, Gary Bunzer, Roger Marble, Mike Sokol, Greg Illes, J.M. Montigel and Andrew Robinson. Advertising coordinator: Gail Meyring. Marketing director: Jessica Sarvis. IT wrangler: Kim Christiansen.

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Everything in this newsletter is true to the best of our knowledge. But we occasionally get something wrong. We’re just human! So don’t go spending $10,000 on something we said was good simply because we said so, or fixing something according to what we suggested (check with your own technician first). Maybe we made a mistake. Tips and/or comments in this newsletter are those of the authors and may not reflect the views of RVtravel.com or this newsletter.

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This newsletter is copyright 2018 by RVtravel.com

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squeakytiki

No iron, but I bought the tiniest clothes steamer ever and I do bring that.

Linda Costanzo

What’s an ironing board??!! LOL!?

Martinr

No iron nor board but keep a spray bottle of “wrinkle release” on board.

Bob p

When we camped in state parks where I had to use an extension cord to reach to power pedestal I always wrapped the cord plug connection with Saran Wrap and placed it on a piece of wood or a rock to keep it off the ground. Took up less room than a bucket.