RV Daily Tips Newsletter 968

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Issue 968 • September 11, 2018

This newsletter is brought to you Monday through Thursday by RVtravel.com and is funded primarily through voluntary subscription contributions from our readers. Thank you!

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Canadian shoppers: Shop at Amazon.ca


QUICK TIPS

Don’t get stung!
With electricity expert and veteran RVer Mike Sokol
I learned a long time ago that a trailer parked for any length of time is the perfect spot for a wasp nest in the trailer tongue/coupler. Wasps don’t take kindly to disturbing them and will reward you with a bunch of stings. So I always sent my road crew out with a can of wasp spray for a little spritz inside the hole before lowering the coupler down on the ball. Any wasp spray should work, but my wife likes the ones with a long distance stream since she can get the wasp nests out of the eves from far away.

Trailer rocking?
If your trailer rocks, even with your stabilizers engaged, check your leaf springs. Worn leaf springs can create quite a seismic disturbance!


Did you miss the latest RV Travel Newsletter? If so, read it here.

JOIN US IN HERSHEY
Please meet with RVtravel.com in Hershey, Pennsylvania, this week at the country’s largest RV show. It begins tomorrow and continues through the weekend. If you attend, please stop by the Power Play Room in Giant Arena at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday through Sunday, for a one-hour RV Travel Meetup. Editor Chuck Woodbury will be there along with some of his staff.


Finally! A Solution for Smaller RV Sinks!
Road & Home™ is your go-to for your RV faucet needs. With a selection of styles designed specifically for the smaller blueprint of an RV, we have just what you need to get the job done! To shop the Road & Home selection of kitchen and bath faucets, click here.


Today’s brain teaser (answer below): This belongs to you, but everyone else uses it. What is it?


JOIN THE NEW FACEBOOK GROUP: RV Horror Stories (A place to share your story about a new RV you recently bought that is riddled with defects that your dealer or manufacturer can’t or won’t repair.)


MORE QUICK TIPS

Spray lube can storage
Finding it hard to find a place to put those cans of WD-40 and similar spray lube cans? The irksome things just get up and roll around, or in a worst-case scenario, run up against something and squirt. Here’s a suggestion from Lew Wilkinson on Facebook. He stores his in a “magazine” storage bin. You can find them on Amazon.

The realities of motorhome fuel mileage
With uncertainty about long-term fuel prices, motorhome buyers are often concerned with how many miles per gallon a motorhome might get. It is a very reasonable concern – as some motorhomes will only get 6 to 8 miles per gallon. The reality is, if you only drive your motorhome three thousand miles per year (which is the average), miles per gallon won’t make a huge difference in the long run. But if you plan to put a lot of miles on your coach each year, the fuel costs can be significant.

When it comes to fuel mileage, here’s what you can expect: Most gas Class A coaches powered by the Ford Triton V10 motor will get 7 to 10 miles per gallon, depending on how they are driven. Fuel mileage goes down at higher speed and in mountainous terrain or driving with a headwind. Most gas Class C coaches powered by either big block Ford or Chevy motors will get 8 to 11 miles per gallon. … If your goal is to get the absolute best fuel mileage in any motorhome, simply keep the speed under 62 miles per hour. At higher speeds, the wind resistance puts a higher demand on the engine which requires more fuel. Driving 65 mph will drop fuel mileage by 20%. Driving 70 mph will drop fuel mileage by 40% (except in large diesel pushers).
FromBuying a Used Motorhome – How to get the most for your money and not get burned

Do you have a tip? Send it to Russ (at) rvtravel.com


Keep gray tank odors away
AND MAKE MORE ROOM UNDER YOUR SINKS
HepvO is a unique self-sealing waste valve that prevents the escape of foul sewer air from waste discharge systems, and actively maintains the pressure equilibrium in soil and waste installations. As a dry sealing valve, HepvO utilizes a purpose designed membrane to create an airtight seal between the living space and the drainage system. Learn more.


WEBSITES OF THE DAY

37 ways to reduce waste
We all know we produce too much waste (and no, not the waste that comes from too many beans). This website, Small Family Footprint, has put together a great list of ways to be mindful about waste. Worth a read to get you thinking. 

Drivin’ & Vibin’
This family of three lives full-time on the road and writes great blog posts about living minimally and mindfully. 

Check out the long list of great RVing-related websites from RVtravel.com.



Protect yourself from intruders, bears and more!
The BASU
 eAlarm lets us explore, sleep, and adventure with confidence! This tiny device emits a 130-decibel alarm which scares away intruders, burglars, and wild animals, and will call for help if you find yourself stranded. Used by the RV Travel staff, you can count on this alarm to keep you safe. Learn more or order here. 


Answer to today’s brain teaser: Your name


Join us: FacebookTwitterYouTube.

LEAVE HERE WITH A LAUGH
Q: What do you call a blind dinosaur?
A: Doyouthinkhesaurus

Q: What do you call a blind dinosaur’s dog?
A: DoyouthinkhesaurusRex!

Thanks to the movie “Jurassic Park” for the joke!

Today’s Daily Deals at Amazon.com
Best-selling RV products and Accessories at Amazon.com. UPDATED HOURLY.


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RV Daily Tips Staff
Editor and Publisher: Chuck Woodbury. Managing editor: Diane McGovern. Staff writer: Emily Woodbury. Contributing writers: Russ De Maris, Bob Difley, Gary Bunzer, Roger Marble, Mike Sokol, Greg Illes, J.M. Montigel and Andrew Robinson. Advertising coordinator: Gail Meyring. Marketing director: Jessica Sarvis.

ADVERTISE on RVtravel.com and/or in this newsletter. Contact Gail Meyring at Gail(at)RVtravel.com .

Everything in this newsletter is true to the best of our knowledge. But we occasionally get something wrong. We’re just human! So don’t go spending $10,000 on something we said was good simply because we said so, or fixing something according to what we suggested (check with your own technician first). Maybe we made a mistake. Tips and/or comments in this newsletter are those of the authors and may not reflect the views of RVtravel.com or this newsletter.

Mail us at 9792 Edmonds Way, #265, Edmonds, WA 98020.

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This newsletter is copyright 2018 by RVtravel.com

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Eric Meslin
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Eric Meslin

I too tow my trailer at 55 to 60. Load range C trailer tires have a max speed of 65. I’m always surprised how many pass going about 70. With the wind I’ll go 60 on the highway. Against the wind more like 50 to 55. I drove across South Dakota last week with a 30 to 40 mph cross or head wind. I probably should have stopped, but I could only manage about 40 to 45. I also stay off interstates as much as possible and try to maintain the posted speed limit, or use pullovers in mountainous areas… Read more »

Nancy
Guest
Nancy

Wondered if this question has ever been posted on reader poll;
If camping alone, would you answer a knock on your camper door after dark? This seems to be a good topic on a women’s RV site, but, I think it’s a good question based on if your camping alone…no matter if you are Male, female, packing or not. Is it something you would do.

Ron H.
Guest
Ron H.

We pull a CR-V behind our Class “A” and usually 55-60 mph. It’s the most comfortable speed for us so we can relax and enjoy the ride with minimum traffic stress. No concerns about gas mileage or being the slowest on the road.

Gary R
Guest
Gary R

It really is amazing how many people towing travel trailers pass me when I’m going 60 mph. Many times they’re weaving all over their lane. I give these people a wide berth because I don’t want to be anywhere near them when things go sideways.

I’ve found that it doesn’t matter what speed I drive, someone will pass me. So I drive at a speed that is both safe and good for mpg and let the fast guys go.

Steve St Martin
Guest
Steve St Martin

I always drive 55-60 in my V-10 gas coach
Get the most from my 70 gallon tank

snayte
Guest
snayte

I cannot explain it but I get better mileage towing my trailer at 65 than I do at 60. I assume it has something to do with the gear that I can run in when going just a bit faster.

Mike H
Guest
Mike H

It’s amazing to me how many times I’ve been passed on the road by speed racer motor homes, all shapes and sizes, even towing, ( and we’ve all seen it or maybe it’s YOU) running in excess of 70 mph. Most MH tires are only rated for 75mph max and realize you’re driving something as aero dynamic as a BRICK !!!

Darrel
Guest
Darrel

My six speed Allison motorhome (4060 series, with Cummins ISM) shifts into 6th at 63 mph. I can then slow to 61 if roads are flat. In rolling hills 65 keeps me in 6th most of the time.

55-60 keeps us in 5th with worse fuel consumption.

John Crawford
Member
John Crawford

My Allison has a economy mode that keeps it in 6th more. I can average 11 mpg diesel at just about any speed.

Tommy Molnar
Guest
Tommy Molnar

I agree with you, Ray . . .

Ray
Guest
Ray

RV fuel mileage? I always say “it’s not bad for a house”

Buzzelectric
Guest
Buzzelectric

I thought the brain teasers answer was my toilet.

RV Staff
Admin

😀 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

Wolfe
Guest
Wolfe

Belongs to me but everyone else uses it?

…my taxes?
…my time?
…my patience?