RVtravel.com editor Woodbury interviewed on CNBC about RVing

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RVtravel.com editor Chuck Woodbury was among several RV industry insiders interviewed by CNBC last week in a segment titled “Why RV Sales Are Growing.” Woodbury is interviewed five times in the piece, explaining how wonderful RVing can be, but that those just taking up the lifestyle need to be careful about their RV choices, and be honest about their expectations.

He discusses how RVing has evolved from something for “Grandma and Grandpa” to today, where the idea of traveling with an RV is trendy and popular among all age groups.

He also talks about the problem of crowded RV parks, and that it costs $20,000 to $25,000 per campsite to build a new one. “It takes a long time to get that money back,” he said. With RV sales rising dramatically in recent months, and places to camp with them not keeping pace, Woodbury asks, “Where will all these people stay?”

He also talks about the cheap construction of some RVs, noting that would-be buyers need to inspect a prospective RV very closely before making a purchase to know exactly what they’re buying.

The report was viewed approximately a half-million times the first week it was posted on YouTube. Here it is.

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Judy and Bob
2 months ago

I find it interesting that RVIA does unannounced safety inspections. Not one mention of quality inspections however.

Alvin
2 months ago

The unfortunate part of a potential buyer “inspecting” a unit before buying is that not many folks know how to do this or what would be important to look for.
Some of the built in faults (like the Thor battery cable recall in this issue of RV Travel) are just plain not visible to the trained or untrained eye.
If I, (as a person with over 40 years automotive experience and as accredited collector car appraiser and evaluator), suggest very strongly tow things.

One: Check thoroughly every aspect of all manufacturers of the type of RV you need then select from the best of the lot for your purchase.

Second – (particularly if buying pre-owned) – find a competent, appraiser/evaluator,(definitely not the cheapest – cheap is never good) and let him/her at it to inspect.

Follow those two rules – both are necessary & often will prove to be the best investment before making one of the largest purchases of a lifetime.

Bob M II
2 months ago

I think the increase in people purchasing RV’s is great. But there needs to be increased government regulations in ensure quality and safety in manufacturing. There also needs to be more government involvement forcing manufactures to cover the warranties. There are only a couple parts manufactures, one of which makes poor quality product. Need more and larger RV service repair centers. Presently your RV can sit for weeks before the shop gets to service it. RV Repair shops charge to much for repair, $130.+ per hour for service. I’ve seen new RV’s at RV shows falling apart as poor workmanship before being sold.

Alvin
2 months ago
Reply to  Bob M II

Bob you are absolutely correct. Lack of proper regulation alongside adequate facilities to repair recreational vehicles is a gold mine of opportunity for budding trades people to jump on.

If I could turn back the hands of time, and once again a kid of 19 again looking for a career in automotive repair I’d turn on a dime and head to a tech centre training in the repair of RV’s.

I retired fully and comfortably at 59. An ambitious person in RV repair if they kept their nose to the grindstone for 30 straight years, could retire at 50 and leave a worthy successful to the kids, so a second generation could keep people on the road in their safe relaibale RV’s instead of a never ending line-up months long. Everybody wins

Dr. Willie Live
2 months ago

Very good article. It is just going to be harder to find a place to park. Friends driveways in the boonies are going to be your best bet. Happy Trails.