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Electric vehicles could change the way we camp

By Mike Gast
My good friend Chuck Woodbury and I were talking recently about electric vehicles (EVs). (You may remember Chuck as the writer in this space for the past 1,000 issues!) How soon would it be, we wondered, until campground owners would be dealing with EV owners showing up, desperate to plug in for an electronic “refill” of their goofy e-car? We laughed about the possibility, in some distant future, of an electric vehicle towing its own RV.

Well, take a look at the photo at the top of this story. That’s a Tesla, towing an Airstream Bambi, pulling out of a campground recently just south of San Francisco. The future, I’m afraid, has already arrived and it’s looking for a place to plug in.

There are a few visionary RV park owners out there who have already installed standalone, pay-to-plug EV charging stations at their parks, generating a bit of a cashflow from the new Green Economy. Most of the dedicated EV charging stations can “rapid charge” a car from empty to full in about an hour-and-a-half. Most EV users are just passing through, and only using campgrounds as filling stations if it’s allowed.

Is charging up at a campground safe?

But most campground owners will soon be faced with the dilemma of deciding whether to allow more long-distance electronic vehicle owners to plug their fancy adapters into existing 50-amp site power pedestals. Doing so might tie up a site for several hours. With campgrounds bulging full this summer, there are bound to be conflicts.

The power pedestal folks are warning that charging EVs on traditional campground pedestals isn’t smart for the car or the campground. Both could be damaged if things aren’t done perfectly.

And imagine the turmoil when a 40-foot class A diesel pusher arrives with an electric vehicle in tow. That overnight RVer will certainly want to plug their EV into the 50-amp to recharge, and likely use a 30-amp adapter to draw power to their RV at the same time from the same pedestal to power those two air conditioners, umpteen televisions and an occasional burst from the microwave. Not many campground power grids will survive that amperage draw.

State governments, especially in California, are hot to entice more “green” development and e-charging stations by dispersing valuable “Green Credits” and other incentives. No doubt, the newly green Executive Branch in D.C. will also be sweetening the pot.

What new electric vehicles should you be on the lookout for?

The new Ford F-150 Lightning EV.

Ford just unveiled an all-electric F-150 truck. Tesla is set to start producing their 250-mile-range pickup in 2022. And we know there are all-electric motorhomes on the drawing board. Winnebago unveiled their prototype way back in 2018, and Camping World has a partnership with Lordstown Motors to create an all-electric RV.

The German WOF Iridium EV RV.

A German company called WOF began actually selling its Iridium EV RV in 2019 in Europe. That rig has a whopping range of 124 miles per full charge, which makes for a rather frustrating cross-country trip. But battery enhancements are happening every day. Campground owners ignore this electronic future at their own peril.

What’s next?

The issues brought on by electric vehicles for both RVers and campgrounds are many. How can you efficiently provide charging stations? When should you consider purchasing your own EV? When will we see all-electric RVs on the market? How far can you really expect to travel in a day with an EV?

The questions regarding electric vehicles and the future of RVing are endless. In the coming weeks, we’ll take a look at the stuff we think you should know on the subject. We also welcome your questions regarding EVs and the future, and we promise to do our best to provide you answers.

Stay tuned. We’ve got a lot to talk about.

##RVT1001

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Vanessa Simmons
4 months ago

I wrote to Ford and offered to be a tester for their new truck. To tow my 26′ TT with full solar hookup. To test to see if the vehicle could be charged from my solar panels through the RV since they tout it as being able to run your house in a power outage.

Mark Generales
4 months ago

Why is this journal jumping on the EV hype wagon? There are so many MORE important issues!

  1. Not one location in America ANYWHERE has the infrastructure to charge EV cars let alone RV’s in any volume.
  2. Minerals needed to make the batteries just for EV cars let alone RV’s, trucks, etc do not exist – hundreds of mines will need permitting and creation – each a minimum of 10 years to first production.
  3. Go to your local equipment rental store – every single item from cement finishing to whatever is gas powered. Construction is massively fossil fuel dependent.
  4. California has rolling blackouts NOW. You think in 15 years ALL of CA will be EV? They will be living on generators and candle power if they move forward.
  5. What campground ANYWHERE – US National to private is going to invest MILLIONS to upgrade for charging and then be able to raise camping fees to $300 or more per night to recoup?

Please – deal with rational issues and not hype. These articles are poorly researched.

Bob P
4 months ago

Wow did you disturb the hornets nest with this article, my comment is your erroneous statement about towing this imaginary EV. Currently no EV cane be flat towed, I probably am mistaken but I think only the Nissan Leaf is front wheel drive where it can be towed on a dolly, and your claim of recharging from empty to full in a couple of hours is a typical journalist pipe dream.

andrew
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob P

You are mistaken, but only just… We are currently flat towing our jeep Wrangler 4xe around. It has only been out a couple of months, and only had around 25 miles of electric range.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago

Where do I start. This is just media hype. The problem is battery technology. There will be a very small percentage of the population that “embraces” this, thinking they are greenies. Where do you think the energy comes from, FOSSIL FUEL charges those batteries. The grid can’t handle summertime heat waves let alone charging unreliable Teslas.

It’s actually amusing to read all this stuff. If anyone would bother to do the deep dive on battery technology, you would find out that there is no path in the foreseeable future, to charge fast, enough energy, economically, to achieve what is sold to the public in there dumb articles. I hate to break it to you but we are MANY YEARS away from having that magic storage device to facilitate any real application to a electric mode of transportation. Let alone tow a 8,000 lb 5th wheel. Wind mills are not the answer, SEE Texas. Solar is woefully inefficient, they just lie to you, subsidize the purchase, with money the government prints.

M Aikens
4 months ago

Obviously if it’s years away we should just give up now. Wow, could you be more bias? You pushing the Texas lies about wind only prove it.

Joe
4 months ago

California has a set goal of zero emissions by 2045. What that means for electricity is solar, wind and importing fossil fired electricity from outside the sate. All new sales of gasoline will be banned by 2035. So if you thoughts and dreams of visiting California in your traditional fuel motorhome or other RV you have 14 years and counting. If California residents hate having total brownouts, blackouts and the awesome rolling blackouts just wait for the electric grid to get overloaded with vehicles charging. At present time their grid can hardly handle the summer electrical draw.

George Tway
4 months ago

I purchased a Thor Vegas in 2017 (30A) coach. Also I bought a 2017 Ford C-Max Energi plug in hybrid. It came with a 110v 12A charger. In 2017 we used it with no problems.
In 2018 I purchased a 240V 20A charger for the C-Max. During a trip from California to British Columbia and back, I used both methods of charging. There was only one problem charging with either system concurrently with the RV. One campground only had 20A 110V hookups. With both the RV and C-Max connected the RV Surge Guard disconnected at 109V. Charged the car and then reconnected the RV. At another RV Park with only 20a at the end of a long extension cord we had no problems using two of their cords.
Using commercial charging stations the C-Max will fully charge using 240v in about 2 hours and costs $2.50 to 3.50. With campsites costing north of $50 to $100 there is plenty of profit to cover charging costs.

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  George Tway

Right – you are one person going out of his way to do this. Make it everyone mandated with no choice. You think the RV parks are gonna build out a grid and stay at $50/night?

Reality is there is not enough power generation in North America anyway. And not one part of the entire grid anywhere can handle the volume.

Truth? This is all BS. We SHOULD be converting to massively plentiful and totally clean natural gas. Infrastructure exists and conversions of existing motors is a minor cost vs EV.

Rather than bend over to big government and their soon to be enriched benefactors – we the people should be demanding natural gas cars. Your local trash truck, muni bus system and utility company vehicles are all natural gas. No environmental issues with tons of worn out batteries. No mines needed. No giving China power over us.

EV is pure hype for a small number of people to make BILLIONS and more important – to enable government to have total control over our lives using climate change.

Carson Axtell
4 months ago

Once EVs roll out and start taking a larger share of space on the roads and parking lots in the nation we’ll begin to see the advancements in battery technology and overdue electric grid upgrades that will be demanded to support them. The same levels of advancements happened when internal combustion vehicles started rolling out on the primitive dirt roads and wagon trails that were the backbone of America’s byways a century ago, and nary a service station could be found outside of cities. The infrastructure investment and new service industries to support the technology could be a welcome boon to the economy, as well. Interesting days are ahead of us…

Last edited 4 months ago by Carson Axtell
BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Carson Axtell

So, we burn fossil fuels to generate electricity to charge cars that take hours to top off, as opposed to maybe 4 mins to fill a tank with gasoline. Solar doesn’t work when the sun sets. Wind mills don’t work when the wind is calm. So, it’s night time, and it’s calm out.

Ask the geniuses what you do then. Don’t bother, I’ll answer that for you; have a redundant fossil fuel system to supply the grid demand. If not see Texas this past winter. And the aftermath keeps paying dividends. See the cost of chicken wings lately, that’s because all the chickens FROZE TO DEATH in Texas, after that last boondoggle.

Bob P
4 months ago

Yep you tell them, the Mamas and Papas had a hit song that tells it all, California Dreamin’.

Michael Bates
4 months ago

I was in a campground in southern Colorado last September when a visitor pulled in at the space occupied next to me. they proceeded to find adaptors and extension cords to charge up the visitors car. while I know that the campers paid to have an electric site, the visitor probably did not pay to charge their car. while the campground was well maintained and run, from what I could tell the electrical system would need some serious up grades to be able to accommodate charging electric vehicles at every site.
I currently own a F 150 with a 500+ mile range empty, and a 300 mile range towing my 8000lb GVWR 5th wheel. at the very best the F150 lightning would only get approximately 100 to 125 miles towing my camper. Not even close for towing or empty!
I do like the Horse power and torque numbers, but those numbers are often measured differently between electric and gas motors. was the electric motor measured with the same method as a gas engine?
Then there is the battery problem!

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  Michael Bates

New Ford F150 EV – towing gets 150 miles on one charge. Biden loved it. By the way – more hype. If you didn’t see – there were 2 steering wheels and controls – he wasn’t even driving it!

That F150 EV needs 41 minutes to recharge to 80%. 150 miles and 41 minutes every time.

Your analysis is dead on. Now let’s talk construction. Cement trucks. Delivery. Long haul. Trains. Soccer moms.

Nowhere is ANYONE – ANYWHERE gearing up any kind of power line infrastructure to deliver this. Where are the new FOSSIL FUEL power plants being planned and built? Windmills and solar – we do not have the materials ANYWHERE in the WORLD to build anything close to 10% of what is needed let alone a 2035 conversion.

Folks – hype and lies. Wake up to what government is doing. Want clean air – convert to natural gas. It is US owned not Chinese. Conversions are massively less expensive than EV. And it is readily available and your existing RV could be converted. EV will destroy the USA.

DennisD
4 months ago

This all sounds great but as an average bloke looking at this from the 30,000 foot level, it begs the question, “If there is not enough power to keep the AC units running in the summer causing Electrical Brownouts, what makes you think the situation will improve by adding a plethora of EV’s?’ That’s a lot of Made in China Solar Panels. IMHO

younger aarp
4 months ago
Reply to  DennisD

Yes! The US doesn’t have any sort of grid to handle this exponential growth of electrical demand.

And YES!!! All of the solar panels, the batteries, the Tesla Powerwalls for home batteries, the accessories, cords, equipment to upgrade everything to hookup vehicles and homes for EV and solar – all of it for the world comes from China!!!

And add in AI, technology, and drones, and you’ve summed up China’s openly stated plan for world dominance before 2035 (due to the pandemic, it is thought that has moved up to 2028 at the latest).

Meanwhile all the countries in the world are going to end up with gargantuan, toxic trash heaps of gas vehicles, gas station tanks and pumps, pipelines, gas lawn mowers. I am even now hearing that we’re supposed to rip out the gas stovetop and gas hot water heater in my home because of the methane. How is all this new manufacturing, shipping, installation, removal, and toxic trash going to help the environment??!

[to be continued… too long…]

younger aarp
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

Plus, the charging stations are not uniform. Telsa has many across the US, but no other EVs can use them, and visa versa. We need a uniform charging system for everyone to be able to charge at any station for this to work in our mobile country that likes day trips, not to mention all us RVers.

I do support the concept of moving from fossil fuels, the biggest immediate “win” I can see is the health of our kids and grandkids. Less lung diseases, less heart diseases from particles in the air. And yes, long-term we will hopefully stop the damage to our atmosphere and allow it to go back to cooling our planet and making it healthier.

BUT, we must do this all in a MEASURED PACE!!! All the news is jumping like we each have a spare $40,000-$150,000 lying around to buy an EV, get the equipment, change our roofs to panels, add in the home battery systems, and pay the massive jump in taxes from not just maintaining our roads from what used to be a gas tax, but to also pay for the crazy amount of infrastructure needed to manage this whole transition. Make solar and the products in the USA and our partners. Dismantle the old stuff as it wears out, into safe trash that can be turned into new items. Figure out what the heck we are going to do with the hundreds of millions of 1st generation, non-reusable batteries that will be showing up at landfills across the US in the next decade, learn from our mistakes and figure out how to make reusable batteries. Start building items that don’t wear down like the Chinese products, make our business model to be QUALITY that lasts like it did 50+ years ago, when people passed items down through generations and even hundreds of years. Go back to appreciating the work our artisans can do, put them with our greatest thinkers and engineers and see what they can do for us all.

We can do it, but it’s going to be a lot of hard work, and cost a lot for every person.

We also need to remember to stop supporting industries only made in China like solar. If they are allowed to have dominance over the rest of the world, well, we all know why we buy manufacturered goods from China – we all have a NIMBY attitude and let them pollute their own people to manufacture what we want. If they ran the world, it would certainly not be a cleaner, healthier place, because that government does not currently support such ideals. We need to keep aware of that, when we all start complaining about the costs involved in moving to a greener world (me included, it’s going to be rough). Manufacturing cleaner without busting the bank is the future of our country. It is a fine line to walk. I just hope the younger people remember when the US was a leader in manufacturing.

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

So well said.

Frankly, I believe we are being set up by a well coordinated government/industry cabal. Imagine vehicle builders salivating about replacing every single car in the world!!!! The sales figures boggle the mind.

Meanwhile, the USA has almost 1,000 years of natural gas reserves – known – in the ground today. CLEAN NATURAL GAS AT CHEAP PRICES WITH NOMINAL CONVERSION COSTS TO USE.

We are being lied to. This is 100% control by the few. Between owning our health care and energy – we will have turned 100% control of our entire lives to others with no recourse.

We wake up soon and reverse this insanity before it is too late. 2022 will not come quickly enough. I just hope we don’t hit $4-$5 gallon gas by Labor Day.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

I got so pumped reading what you said, I just drove my RV to the gas station to fill it up before they become obsolete. Just kidding. You make too much sense, nobody will believe you!!!

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  DennisD

Dennis, if your not a millionaire by now, how is that not possible. EVERY thing you say makes sense. Oh, I know why, common sense has no worth lately, just look around!

Colin
4 months ago

Campgrounds will need to put in a lot of new large capacity wiring or have charging stations by the office. Think about the wire size needed if you want to charge one car or truck in a camp site a 1000 feet from the breaker box. Then multiply it by 10 or 20 vehicles. Mike Sokol could write a good article on this.

Nick
4 months ago

I don’t think people realize just how much electricity is required to charge a Tesla. Charging times are given as ‘miles per hour of charge’ or MPH. 220v at 60a you get 25-30 miles. For 300 miles that’s 10-12 hours. The quick charge system is 480v at 300amps. Tesla says ‘up to 170 miles in a 30 min charge’. For 300 miles it’s more like 2 hours.
About 70% of our electricity comes from fossil fuels. I just don’t see an electric grid conversion plan and certainly don’t consider EVs ‘green’.
And we haven’t even started talking large vehicles, trains, ships and aircraft.

Last edited 4 months ago by Nick
Jim
4 months ago
Reply to  Nick

Power plants are waaaaaaaay cleaner than a car, make no mistake about that. I sit at a charger for about 20 min. Enough time to eat and go to the bathroom. For a 300 mile charge it’s not even 1 hour, maybe 40 min. I’m not just guessing, I own one.

younger aarp
4 months ago
Reply to  Jim

That sounds nice. Good to be hearing your experiences in the comments. I’ve never had an EV, the insides look beautiful!
We looked into a Tesla solar+battery install for our sticks&bricks last summer, but the ROI was 12-13 years. Didn’t seem prudent when the pandemic was still going crazy back then. Expecting there should be some good incentives from the current administration to buy & install solar. Tesla couldn’t have installed last year before the incentives ended in 2020.

Diane Mc
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

Good incentives = taxpayer money.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Diane Mc

Taxpayer money = hyper inflation

Donn
4 months ago

Excellent article.

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  Donn

Pure hype

Frank
4 months ago

The electric vehicles are a shame, they are not zero emissions as people would believe. Seen the studies on this matter.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Frank

Forget the “studies” that’s college lingo. FOSSIL FUELS charge the cars. Carry on.

Joe
4 months ago

Hydrogen power has been kicked around for a few decades and has been used in space to generate electricity, they are called fuel cells. Experiments were done on them many years ago to produce electricity for a house. The fuel cell produces electricity, heat and water and can be built as large as a small power generator for a small town. I think it never got legs because people still know about the Hindenburg.

rich
4 months ago

i will consider an EV only when the range is comparable to a gas vehicle AND i can “re-fuel” in the same amount of time it takes to pump gas. until then no, thanks.

Jim
4 months ago
Reply to  rich

I hear ya, but for 90% of my driving I never stop anywhere to re charge.. Only on my semi monthly trip across my state that I charge anywhere. Other than that I drive 110 miles a day for a couple bucks. In my roughly 29 mpg car I had to pump every 3 days or so, at least. I wasted a lot of time waiting for oil changes, spark plugs and maintenance over the years. Oh and I live in a motorhome and just charge from the 30 amp at my pedestal. Works great

younger aarp
4 months ago
Reply to  Jim

Do you tow your EV behind your motorhome? Is it different from towing a gas vehicle, such as can you tow it with 4 wheels on the ground and engine be ok? I know zero about EVs. Are you usually at one site for weeks & months, or do you move often? Is it tricky setting up to charge at each campground? Do you ever go to rural areas that don’t have enough power, or unreliable power to use? Have you had your EV run out of juice? I watched a good YouTube on some guys in England testing all the EVs in their country, seeing how far they really until empty. Calling a flatbed for an empty “tank” seems not fun. Can you charge your EV via solar panels on your roof?

I envy your fulltime MH + EV situation, I bet it’s been a terrific couple years being ahead of the crowd, and therefore having the best situation. I expect that with everything in the news, in the coming weeks you’ll start getting noticed a bit more than you have been. Do you have a plan B for charging your EV, if the campground won’t let you charge?

Sorry for all the questions, I’m very curious about camping, traveling, and daily living with EVs 🙂

Bob P
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

Currently no EV can be flat towed and his claim he’s charging from a 30A plug is a pipe dream or he’s taking a week to charge. This is from the “experts” in the field.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Jim

Ok, economics lesson 101 is in order here. You can currently get AWAY with your “couple of bucks” now, but in the alternative universe sector, the greenies dont understand taxation. Close to 40% of petrolium retail pricing is TAX, such INVENTIVE terms as Fed. Excise tax, gasoline tax, not to mention your everyday sales tax . So, as long as your the anomaly, you can skate under the radar, BUT, as soon as the revenue stream from fossil fuel taxes slows sufficiently, guess where the tax repositions, YOUR ELECTRIC BILL. Carry on.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  rich

News flash; when pigs can fly!

Bob P
4 months ago
Reply to  rich

Absolutely

Penny
4 months ago

We had an electric car before RVing and it cost less then $2 a day on house current up charge. With 30 or 50 amp it should charge quick and not cost much.

Tesla may be approached to allow camp grounds to install his solar chargers would cost the site nothing as they are solar powered. He has a good system of bg them across the US.

Gas and there carbon fuels will run out soon (estimate is vf 30 years now last I heard). So this bg may be the future.

rich
4 months ago
Reply to  Penny

“experts” have been predicting running out of dino juice for years. not gonna happen anytime soon.

younger aarp
4 months ago
Reply to  rich

Agreed! But Russia has now called dibs on the Arctic, where it is thought to be 1/4 of our remaining fossil fuels. They’ve setup missle stations all over the entire Arctic. And we’ve setup the same in Iceland. James Bond returns. I hope no one uses their missles.

Last edited 4 months ago by younger aarp
BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

Russia’s economy is equivalent to Italy’s. Put that in perspective. You ever look into how backward Russia is. Ever see the motor vehicles they manufacture, no you havnt. You know why, there all JUNK.

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  younger aarp

America has 1,000 years of PROVEN natural gas reserves. Convert existing vehicles and make new ones to run NG.

Did you know in CALIFORNIA – 60% OF ALL HOMES HAVE NATURAL GAS PIPED TO THE HOME – 60%. Subsidizing the equipment to fill a car or rv tank is nothing compared to the electrical grid, solar, wind and power plant needs.

EV is insanity.

Colin
4 months ago
Reply to  Penny

You must have been driving a Nissan Leaf with a low range to only spend $2 for a charge.

Jim
4 months ago
Reply to  Colin

It cost $6 in PA for my model 3 from empty to full, which you never do, so yea, a couple bucks a day for a moderate drive is right. Depends on the power company though

Carson Axtell
4 months ago
Reply to  Penny

“If God had wanted men to ride around in automobiles He never would have given us horses.”

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Carson Axtell

If God didn’t care about how humans use to languish and work long hard hours in virtual darkness for thousands of years, he wouldn’t have let us discover OIL.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Penny

Stop with the misinformation, it’s scares people. Through technology, we have unlocked up to at least 100 year supply of Nat Gas, with more to be discovered. Carry on.

Mark Generales
4 months ago

Folks we know on Wall Street tell us not 100 Years – 1,000 years – and with current growth levels.
We are 100% energy independent and NOT BENDING OVER TO CHINA.

WHY IS BIDEN TRYING TO FORCE US TO BEND OVER TO CHINA? DIDN’T COVID TEACH US ANYTHING?

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  Penny

Penny – pray tell – you think a solar charger system is going to be the answer for a campground full of ev rv’s? Rolling blackouts. Texas sized outages. The grid is non existent. The minerals needed for mass production of batteries is non existent and years away from production.

New Flash – American has approx 1,000 YEARS of NATURAL GAS RESERVES IN THE GROUND IN AMERICA RIGHT NOW. CLEAN NATURAL GAS.

You won’t see that headline in the NYTimes or WaPo or on MSNBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN. But it is fact. Tesla is a minor car company with minor sales and look at history – ANYWHERE GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES HAVE BEEN REMOVED TESLA AND EV SALES TANK.

20% of EV car owners in America have gone back to gas – did you know that? Driving 10 miles to work and parking in your garage – probably the only one on your block is one thing. Make it the entire neighborhood – every house, car, truck – not in our lifetime.

WE SHOULD CONVERT TO PLENTIFUL NATURAL GAS NOW.

Bob Phillips
4 months ago

We recently saw a Tesla with a teardrop trailer in an Idaho state park. They were normal campers (several day stay) and had the car plugged in all the time it was in the site. Many of our parks are already marginal in power supply and I think that electric car charging is going to have to be restricted to dedicated high power charging stations, prohibited from charging in campsites.

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Bob Phillips

Is that before or after the brown outs occur, smoking the electrical systems on all the rest of us.

Dan
4 months ago

My only comment about the article is that practical EV RV’s are still a long ways off, and as the article said there are no end to the questions, and even more answers, useless or otherwise. And don’t forget, the technology used in EV’s is evolving faster than we can measure. However the best part of this article is reading the comments. They are mostly just opinions, but some of y’all put them out there like they are cold, hard facts. Hilarious.

Steve
4 months ago
Reply to  Dan

The fact that many comments are opinion is because most of the info being put out is visionary pipe dreams. A Tesla pickup that “MAY” have 250 mile range, but we are not sure what the camper would look like other than a futuristic mock up rendering. And it is certainly not a 400 HP diesel that can pull a 15000 pound 5th wheel at 65 mph for 500 miles in one day, so maybe a little commuter car is fine, but until we have a viable “realistic” option for pulling trailers, electric vehicles are just a tree-huggers dream.

Carson Axtell
4 months ago
Reply to  Dan

Amen. Makes me think of all the complaints about automobiles replacing horses a century ago. Scientists have determined that human ideas about how things “ought to be” are pretty much determined by how things were when the person was in their physical prime, about the age of twenty-five. And “it’s all downhill” with the world from that point forward…

BILLY Bob Thronton
4 months ago
Reply to  Dan

Not mine!!!

Mark Generales
4 months ago
Reply to  Dan

WE HAVE THE NATURAL GAS – CLEAN AND PLENTIFUL SUBSIDIZE CONVERSIONS

IF CLIMATE WAS THE REAL ISSUE – WE’D GO NATURAL GAS TOMMORROW.

EV IS ABOUT POWER. CHINA POWER. THEY OWN THE MINERALS.

UNDERSTAND AMERICA – GO EV AND CHINA OWNS US.

Roger Spalding
4 months ago

David, in an earlier post, is right. Hydrogen powered vehicles will supercede electric cars in reliability, emissions, safety, performance and driving range. The best part is that private hydrogen cuts the government operated and controlled public utilities out of the equation. All electricity supplied to customers at charging stations comes from the nearest power plant. All these power plants generate electricity from burning coal, natural gas, or from nuclear power. There are only a few nuclear plants left in the U.S. Now, since we have stopped producing almost all of our own petroleum, the unstable Middle East is again, doing it for us; powering our electricity power plants and our cars. Electric cars pollute and burn petroleum too; only it comes from the power plants not a tailpipe. Privately produced hydrogen will free cars from pollution, government interference and petro countries which vow to destroy us and Israel.

Dave
4 months ago
Reply to  Roger Spalding

And where do you get the hydrogen from? The sun? (and I’m not talking solar energy).

Hydrogen comes from 2 methods, both use electricity. One uses electrolysis of water and the other conversion of natural gas.

Joe
4 months ago

Are RV pedestals wired to accommodate a 50 amp draw on 1 plug, 30 amps and a 20 amps on the other? that’s 100 amps! Are the 50, 30 and 20 amp plugs individually home run back to a main central breaker box and then have their own breakers in a that box? I think not, more than likely the local box is fed from a central box with a 50 amp supply and then separate protective breakers for 50, 30 and 20 amp outlets at each campsite.

Mike Gast
4 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Joe, that is certainly a main issue for campgrounds. Multiple draws will likely pop the breakers, if you’re lucky.

Dana D
4 months ago

Mike’s research will be “neutral” and fact-based, unlike the hype and lies we hear on the local and national news. I can’t wait to see his results.