Ford F-150 gets surprising dubious title: most dangerous vehicle

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By James Raia
The most popular pickup truck in the United States is also the country’s most dangerous vehicle. At least that’s the result of a new report released by a Lending Tree website, ValuePenguin.com.

According to the analysis, which ranked the 25 Deadliest Vehicles in the United States, the Ford F-150 was involved in 10,845 fatal crashes in the past five years.

The Ford-150 pickup truck is the most dangerous vehicle in the United States during the past five years.
The Ford-150 pickup truck is the most dangerous vehicle in the United States during the past five years.

The Chevrolet Silverado (7,718 fatal crashes), Honda Accord (5,079), Toyota Camry (4,734) and Ram Pickup Trucks (5,897) complete the top-five vehicles on the dubious list.

The Ford Mustang does the worst job of protecting its occupants — 0.71 Mustang occupants are killed per fatal crash. Other cars where occupants did not fare well in fatal crashes include the Ford Taurus (0.7), the Honda Civic (0.7), and the Ford Ranger (0.68).

While the deadliest individual models were pickups and SUVs, passenger cars are still involved in more crashes than any other type of passenger vehicle.

A total of 100,388 passenger cars were involved in fatal crashes over the past five years. Pickups and SUVs are involved in 42,774, and 41,207 fatal crashes, respectively. Minivans were in just 11,006 fatal crashes.

Motorcycles account for 10 percent of fatal crashes, despite making up only 3 percent of the registered vehicles.

Additionally, the number of motorcycle occupants killed per crash is 0.98. The number means if a motorcyclist is involved in a fatal crash, the motorcyclist or their passenger is killed nearly every time.

Cars between 10 and 15 years old are involved in the most fatal crashes, while newer models were involved in fewer crashes.

ValuePenguin.com analysts collected data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and car manufacturers to determine which vehicles are most often involved in fatal crashes.

ValuePenguin.com conducts in-depth research and provides objective analysis to help guide consumers.

To view the full report, visit: Deadliest Vehicle in the United States.

James Raia, a syndicated columnist in Sacramento, California, publishes a free weekly automotive podcast and electronic newsletter. Sign-ups are available on his website, www.theweeklydriver.com. He can be reached via email: james@jamesraia.com.

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Art M.
27 days ago

Not only are the statistics on total accidents worthless without correcting for miles driven or at least the total number of such vehicles on the road, but there was another idiocy in this article.
How can there possibly be 0.71 deaths per fatal accident in a Mustang? The number has to be one or greater. If no one died, it is not a fatal accident!
Both James Raia and RVT usually do much better.

Bill
27 days ago
Reply to  Art M.

There is often more than one car involved in a fatal accident. or sometimes a pedestrian or motorcycle. If the fatal accident involves a pedestrian, or a motorcycle, that is likely the fatality, not the person in the Mustang.

Dave
27 days ago

Absolutely duped by the headline. Note all of these are top sellers and will be involved in more accidents due to their sheer numbers. All of these vehicles do well in crash tests. I would not publish a misleading article like this.

GeorgeB
27 days ago

RVT was duped by this report. Not by the facts, but by the title. Perhaps RVT should take a moment and review the actual report. The survey is yet another example of misleading journalism. When a vehicle sells twice as many units, it is reasonable that vehicle will have twice as many fatalities. Should be a clue when insurance companies do not charge a premium.

Patrick Granahan
27 days ago

This is real cool…..now we are to blame the vehicle and not the drivers.
Like every newscaster blaming the rainy weather for the high number of
crashes during rush hour and not the stupid tailgating drivers who refuse
to slow down when bad weather strikes.

Can’t fix stupid.

Scott R. Ellis
27 days ago

Far be it from me to defend Ford, but I will advocate for caution with statistics: sheer total fatality numbers, as opposed to fatalities per mile driven, tell us pretty much nothing about any given vehicle’s safety. . . .

John Maddox
27 days ago

Just because a vehicle type is involved in the accident does not make it a dangerous vehicle. The F150 is the most popular pickup so it stands to reason it would be involved more. Value penguin is not doing anything to promote safety and knowledge with unexplained statistics

Seve
27 days ago

Figures don’t lie, but liars figure. More F-150’s on the road mean more accidents. Where is the percentage of accidents by vehicle? And who is the source?

Last edited 27 days ago by Seve
Tom
27 days ago

Any vehicle can kill. It is the driver/owner who does the killing. You should see some of the stupid things drivers do, as recorded on my dash camera. Atlanta was tough this week-end.
Poor judgement and poor driver training.

Tommy Molnar
27 days ago

“ValuePenguin.com conducts in-depth research and provides objective analysis to help guide consumers.”

I wonder which consumers they help. I’ve never heard of them.