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Updated gadget review: 100 miles with my Lectric eBike. Do I still love it?

I just hit the 100-mile mark on my Lectric Step Thru eBike. As some of you may remember, I reviewed the Lectric eBike last fall and finally got to the first 100 miles this summer. I wanted to be able to thoroughly test it before I reviewed it again.

Yes, I loved it before, but now I am ready for marriage! It has been a long courtship getting to know each other. The first time I took it out of the box, I stood next to it and inadvertently turned the throttle on, hung on and down I went. Both my knee and pride were hurt. It was not love at first sight then. Later, I read the directions…

Lectric eBike handles the bumps and the pavement

We were at a regional mountain park in AZ that is known for its competitive bike trails through bumpy rock-strewn desert. The first few times out I was just concentrating on not falling, not running into a saguaro, a boulder, another biker, or a random cow. All that caused a terrible strain on nerves. Thank goodness for fat tires!

Bike trail
Bike Trail. Photo credit: Nanci Dixon

We began riding on some quiet city streets this spring and, while not nerve-wracking, it was a bit boring. It was like exercise. Like eating raw spinach or lima beans. Some people’s highlight of the day, but not mine.

Then, oh then, we came to Minnesota—the land of paved, scenic bike trails. Trails with plenty of room, even for a still-weaving bike rider novice. Room for me to stop fixating on the pavement and start seeing the birds, ponds and even the deer around me.

Baker Park Bike trail
Baker Park bike trail

There is even a bike repair and air pump station here!

Bike station
Bike repair and air pump station. Photo credit: Nanci Dixon
Bike repair station
Bike repair station. Photo credit: Nanci Dixon

The bike and I know each other better now.



What I love about my Lectric eBike

  • It’s easy to get on and off.
  • The pedal assist makes it easy to get up hills and lets me work as hard or little as I want. There are five levels of pedal assist. I usually stay at 1 or 2 but got up to 3 once! It was speedy!
  • The throttle. You can control the speed or rest on demand. Makes it great for passing hikers and when more oomph is needed.
  • Battery life. The battery stays charged for a very long time. I have only seen the battery bar go down once and that was after a number of 10-mile rides.
  • The comfort seat is just that… comfortable. The springs under the seat soften the ride.
  • The Lectric eBike is easy to fold and place in a vehicle. We drove from Arizona to Alabama to Minnesota with it in the back of our KIA.
Lectric eBike folded
Lectric eBike folded. Photo credit: Nanci Dixon

What I don’t like about my Lectric eBike

  • The key placement is under the battery near the bottom of the bike. It can be hard to get the key in without tipping the bike or getting on your hands and knees. I’m always concerned that the key may fall out, though it never has.
  • The battery charge inlet is placed too low and is hard to reach to insert the charge cable.
  • The gears are kind of clunky when shifting. Not a big deal, but noticeable. The truth is, I use the throttle more than shifting gears.
  • At 61 pounds it is heavy. I need help to lift it into the car or on our new bike rack.
  • The turning radius. You need more room on an electric bike to turn than a standard bike and it is a bit unwieldy.

Even with a few cons, I am truly in love with my Lectric eBike! I enjoy getting up in the morning and riding with my husband. I have more control, feel more confident and actually enjoy getting some exercise. Perhaps I will even start to like Lima beans!

Oh, and by the way. I have the Lectric XP Step-Thru 2.0 eBike model. You can learn more about it on their website.

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Bob p
47 minutes ago

I thought everyone new about the cardinal rule, When all else fails read the directions. Lol

Nanci
3 hours ago

I now have 300 miles on the Lectric eBike and still love it!

Tommy Molnar
1 month ago

I saw an E-bike at Sportsman’s Warehouse that looked pretty cool. All camo colored, fat tired, with cargo carriers on each side of the rear wheel. I finally found the price tag on this nifty item. It was about $4k! Holy cow. The stats on it looked impressive, but that’s just too much moolah. So I guess I’ll stick to my trusty old 1986 Diamond Back ‘mountain bike’. It has hundreds and hundreds of miles on it and still works fine – as long as I still work fine – ahem. Plus, after reading all these posts it seems like these bike are right up with Ford F-150 pickups for getting stolen.

Bob p
50 minutes ago
Reply to  Tommy Molnar

Ford F-150 is down on the list, Chevy and Ram are above it for thieves.

Greg m
1 month ago

I have a Specialized Turbo Vado & love it. I bought it at the beginning of Covid before there was a shortage of e-bikes. I purposely bought one without a throttle, so I still have to pedal (and get exercise). No excuse now to stay at home because of a windy day. It conquers hills & keeps my butt on the bike at 69 years young. Bought a Specialized so I can get service from a local bike shop. Range is 45-60 miles, depending on how much I use the “turbo-boost”. Weighs about 50 lbs. so I use the lowest assist level most of the time. I use a Saris 2-bike rack & it works well.

Lethia Collins
1 month ago

We are looking for a bike rack that goes on the A-frame of the travel trailer that can hold 2 E-bikes weighing 55 lbs each. Some have suggested the “Jack-it” bike rack, but the weight of our E-bikes is too much. Can’t put bike rack on the travel trailer bumper as it will not support the weight either. Any suggestions for me?

CAREN KELLY
1 month ago

Hi Nanci, my hubby is looking at the Lectrict eBike and wants know where you buy one? Also, how do you secure it or them so they don’t get stolen? We travel in a class A with a toad. You can email me if you like. We are Canadian but travel south for the winter months. Thanks

Nanci
3 hours ago
Reply to  CAREN KELLY

Sorry for the belated response. I just saw your question. They can be ordered online and seen in their store/headquarters in Scottsdale AZ. We are testing out the Hollywood rack on our Class A with a dual hitch and towing a KIA.

rvgrandma
1 month ago

What she didn’t mention is the cruise control on the 2.0 ST. My brother has an expensive ebike. When I told him I had cruise control he was jealous.

Joe Goomba
1 month ago
Reply to  rvgrandma

Our Jetson ($350 @ Costco) ebike has cruise. Your brother got ripped off, methinks.

rvgrandma
1 month ago

I had the 2.0 step through. Bought it last fall. Had to store for winter but finally was able to start riding in March. Finally made it to 100. Took it in for the derailleur to be adjusted because the gears were not shifting right. Sadly it was stolen June 15th. Another couple in the park who had two had them stolen also. Both our bikes were double locked and covered. The persons who stole them knew just where they were. They did not touch any of the numerous other ebikes in the park – just Lectric. Of course with no key or charger they are just a 64 pound bike. am waiting to hear if my insurance will cover it. I was led to believe by my agent last fall that if it was stored by my MH it would be. But, because it has a motor when out riding I would need motorcycle type insurance. From Lectric owners FB group there is a company out there that sells insurance for ebikes. I just got it paid off last month. When my SS came in the 15th I was going to buy an alarm & GPS for it

rvgrandma
1 month ago
Reply to  rvgrandma

If insurance comes through maybe I can buy another one. If not, I will have the memories. I can’t afford another one.

Dick Hime
1 month ago

Nanci: Got my XP last year and I have just 200 miles on mine. I ordered the Comfort System seat recently and that was a big improvement. With small tire radius I agree on the amount room it takes to make a u-turn but that is the nature of smaller diameter wheels having less stability at low speed. Yes, it’s heavy and unwieldy when folded. I also think the battery key switch is in a bad location but I understand why it’s on the bottom instead of the top – for water incursion retardance in the rain or while washing. My XP rides – unfolded – on a Kuat hitch rack on the back for my 35′ fifth wheel well secured with cable locks and in view on my rear vision camera. It’s great campground and smooth trail transportation. I love it. Now I want one with full suspension for off-roading and trail riding. But for the money, it’s a great bike.

Bagman
1 month ago

I have a very expensive regular bike sitting in my garage. Even when I bought it I had problems with knees (for over 50 years) and then had a bad bout with necrotizing pneumonia which when combined with allergies and asthma my chances of using it again are squat. Used to enjoy rides with my wife. Just talked about me getting an electric bike. When I hear the “privileged” people complain about us that can’t do what they do and downgrade us I get… well I’ll use the word “upset’. Eventually Greg and Buddrick may have to face the health problems most of us have done. I’ve been involved with the fight about the millions of acres in “motorless areas” in National Forests that our taxes pay for (government doesn’t have to follow “handicapped access” rules) but only the “fit” can access. Fortunately some trails in Wisconsin have been opened to ATVs and the handicapped can access certain wilderness areas. Unfortunately those in the “silent sports” crowd are upset about this.

Last edited 1 month ago by Bagman
EdH
1 month ago

We also bought Lectric Step-Thru’s on Black Friday last year. My wife and I love them, and having a Sena intercom on our helmets makes it fun to converse while riding! (The intercoms are a little pricey, though.)

The one thing I don’t like about them is how they are geared. I say it’s geared to be an electric bike. It’s like having a 21-speed bike with only the middle gears. Going up a hill is too hard with just the pedals in the lowest gear, and you can’t go too fast downhill or on level ground with just the pedals in the highest gear. If the battery runs out with any kind of terrain, it will be difficult. Otherwise, since my wife is not a big bike person, they allow us to enjoy the ride together. THAT’S what I love!

Ozzie
1 month ago

I bought my 2.0 in April and have almost 60 miles on it, even after several weeks of very little use. My comfort seat didn’t last long as the spring assembly separated from the ‘nest’. Lectric told me they had other similar failures and are in process of changing suppliers, making a replacement seat unavailable until late August. They suggested I find a replacement and they would reimburse me. They suggested Cloud Nine and I ordered from Amazon, sent them a screen shot of the invoice, and they had the funds in my account in 2 days. Their customer service has been great so far.

I don’t change gears, I leave it on 7 and use pedal assist or throttle as I wish. I get 25+ miles per charge so have only charged once so far (it was charged when bought).

Lorna
1 month ago

Thanks Nanci! I may finally have the courage to try one out…they have always seemed so heavy and unwieldy! Appreciate how you truly detailed pros and cons!

rvgrandma
1 month ago
Reply to  Lorna

The new ”Lite” is 20 pounds lighter. You only have one gear but many people who want them mainly for the ‘electric’ ability do not care.

Buddrick
1 month ago

Yea not for me. I have a what they call a “old fashion bike”. Waaaay less money, don’t need another battery to charge, my bike weights 19 lbs, I get to pedal it to make it go. Just me though.

Marty D-B
1 month ago

I have poor balance so I went with a recumbent bike. It’s a blast.

Tony Grigg
1 month ago

I have the same bike, also purchased last fall and also just hit 100 miles this week. I charged it once right out of the box and once again about 6 weeks ago. To be fair, I’m currently in Florida where hills are not to be found, so I generally ride it with zero pedal assist, and have never shifted gears. I just have it ‘on’ to monitor speed and distance traveled. I added the comfort seat also and it is sooo comfy. I think you and I should have a double wedding!

Richard and Anne
1 month ago

My Wife and I each have two ebikes and all of them have more than 4000 miles on them. They are the pedal assist type but hers has the option of having the motor do all the work which is nice at the end of a 20 miler. We also discovered Hard Case tires which have eliminated flat tires for several years now. We cruise at about 14 mph and they are pegged at 18 mph unless we are going down a steep hill. 26 mph on a bike is both thrilling and a little scary for a senior. We always announce when passing slower riders to avoid scaring them. Due to our various health ailments we could not ride without our ebikes.

Crowman
1 month ago

A friend bought one and is on a electric bike forum where everyone posted pictures with their new bike. Now they post pictures of all their bike crashes and the wounds they got. Old people and bikes sometimes are a bad idea ask Joe Biden.

Greg Sorenson
1 month ago

What happened to getting exercise while pedaling your bike? Why are these bikes, that are heavier and much faster allowed on trails with pedal bikes? Most of them do not slow down when encountering pedal bikes.
We are afraid to take our Grandkids on the trails now.

Marty D-B
1 month ago
Reply to  Greg Sorenson

You are pedaling as much as you want on an ebike so it is exercise. You can use the throttle all the time instead of pedaling but I never do.

Stephanie
1 month ago
Reply to  Greg Sorenson

E-bikes have several peddle assist settings in which the rider still peddles to get exercise. Some trails allow them and some don’t. We have seen both. Heavier and faster does not seem to be a fair assessment as to who is allowed on the trails. Compare an older steel frame peddle bike (heavier) to those made today of carbon fiber (faster). I always take into consideration other cyclist on the trails and give yield when applicable, same as any other cyclist should do. Slower on the right, pass on the left. A pro cyclist can go speeds between 14-18 MPH on their peddle bike, should they not be allowed on the trails also? It boils down to the bike handler and their courtesy, not the bike itself.

Stephanie
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephanie

P.S. I ride an E-bike and have over 200 miles on it.

Billinois
1 month ago
Reply to  Greg Sorenson

The beautiful thing about ebikes is you can pedal as little or as much as you want or need to. For those who are physically challenged, ebikes have made a world of difference.
If you’ve never tried one, I suggest you do.
As for excessive speeding on trails, I have not seen that. If you are experiencing a problem you should speak up and tell them to slow down.
Within 5 years, I predict the majority of bikes sales will be of ebikes. We’d better all get used to them. Trails are for everyone. We all pay taxes.

rvgrandma
1 month ago
Reply to  Greg Sorenson

I have been passed on the trail by old fashioned bikes that are going much faster and do not slow down for pedestrians. You will see inconsiderate bikers of both type. I do slow down for walkers and if passing another bike let them know. My biggest fear are parents who see bikes coming but still let their kids run back and forth across the trail or people with dogs off leash (which is allowed unfortunately if they are under verbal control – ha ha) who make no effort to get their dog out of the trail. Thankfully in some places along the Columbia River they have separate trails for pedestrians and bikers. But, some people still will walk on the bike trail not caring.

Billinois
1 month ago

We love our XP 2.0 Step-Throughs. Great value for the money. That said there is a learning curve to ebikes, especially if you haven’t ridden a bike in years.
My wife slowed down to let someone pass on a trail and lost control and down she went. This was 6 weeks ago and she is still recovering from the contusion on her lower leg, which required antibiotics and an ultrasound after an internal infection flared up.
These bikes are heavy (64lbs) and can be difficult to control at slow speeds. They require respect and practice.
My best advice to anyone considering any ebike is to practice in an open area, turning and operating at slow speeds. And ALWAYS wear a helmet!!

rvgrandma
1 month ago
Reply to  Billinois

Before my bike was stolen my most challenging was learning how to start and stop since I could not touch the ground sitting on the seat. I have a bad left knee (trying to avoid replacement and the bike riding was helping) so finding a position for the seat and handlebars that did not cause pain for my knee was a challenge. But I finally did after 100 miles.

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