Jayco halts production of folding trailers

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(January, 11, 2019) — Jayco is stopping production of folding trailers in 2019 until further notice, RV Pro Magazine has reported.

“I’m writing today to advise you of a recent adjustment to our current product lineup,” said Brad Whitehead, general manager of the Jayco Towable division in a letter to partners, obtained by RV PRO.

“In an effort to increase operational efficiency by way of consolidating certain manufacturing facilities, it’s become necessary for us to shelve all Jayco fold down product. Therefore, effective immediately, all unscheduled fold down orders you may have in the backlog are being parked until further notice.”

According to data from the RV Industry Association, wholesale shipments of folding camping trailers are on the decline. In 2017, shipments totaled 9,200 then decreased to 6,500 in 2018. For 2019, RVIA is predicting shipments to total 4,900.

In an email from Doug Moats, Jayco’s communication and public relations manager, the company mentioned how the decision for its Jay Sport line is temporary and production will continue once demand is in place.

“Jay Sport is not going away,” Moats told RV PRO. “Fold down campers and their popularity helped build this company.”

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steve brandt
4 months ago

I see where it was said that the pricing on the pop up is close to a hard side travel trailer this is true, However when have a big family some people want to travel economically and you do not get that with a hard side travel trailer. than consider the ease of storage of a pop up vs a hard side. The better handling of a pop up when towing down the road in windy conditions. there are many advantages to both sides of the story. I have owned 3 pop up campers. 3 hard side travel trailers. 1 pop up pickup camper. 1 hard side pickup camper and 2 high low campers. now i currently own a small pop up palomino. i can store it in my garage when not in use. it sleeps the entire family and 2 dogs and cost very little in fuel to pull it. no tag no insurance to worry about and we go camping more often because it is affordable. oh and i only paid 50.00 for it……..the camper looks like new….when we go camping we spend most of our time outside so why have a big fancy camper on the inside when we are outside most of the time….end result we prefer the pop up camper…..i do understand there are some that going camping should be just like staying at home… so enjoy…to each their own…..

Bigmike
11 months ago

Maybe if they designed them with better floor plans and easier setup/takedown, sales would increase. They put ranges and sinks right next to bedding and don’t have any extra seating if weather is bad. The setup tech of many outdoor chairs, fish houses, hunting shelters, and screen houses is nowhere in pop up campers. Can’t the designers see how folding chairs have changed and apply that to campers? How stupid.

PAMELA SAYLE
1 year ago

will we still be able to purchase canvas and other parts?

Charlie
1 year ago

My parents had a wheel pop up camper in the early 70’s. It’s all he could afford but it got our family camping. He improvised and cut a hole in the camper side and installed a small 5000 btu window unit so we could be comfortable during Florida hot summer nights. He would pull the window unit in for travel. Good times

DARRELL
1 year ago

This is likely due to their pricing. You could buy a travel trailer for little more than these pop-ups cost. That’s probably why they had low sales. It’s too bad though. We started out with a Jayco pop-up and have a lot of great memories with it.

Snayte
1 year ago
Reply to  DARRELL

I agree. We started with a used Coachman Pop Up. When we wanted to get something new we went to a hybrid because it was only slightly more expensive than a new pop up and you certainly got way more in terms of features. Also gone would be the days of cranking that thing up like 4 times per trip for loading and unloading etc.

Lee
1 year ago

Well dang! In the time when tent camping had lost it’s charm but before we were ready for a TT a pop up was the perfect solution. It kept us camping and was a great intro to RVing. Even though we have moved on to a TT, there are times when I really miss the pop up.

jgvtxman
1 year ago

Well, too bad. More choices are always better than fewer, but they have to make business sense. The problem as I see it, people got away from simple starter “pop us” to full on luxury-type units with dormers, and all the interior conveniences. They used to be mostly for sleeping and maybe hauling outdoor camping and cooking items. The industry and the public simply force-priced the units out of the market—so close in cost or more than full box style trailers. Too much mechanical and set up processes to go through for a lot of folks.

James Beirlein
1 year ago

Jayco and other pop ups have been the entry point for young families for decades. Our family had four different pop ups each one larger and better than the last until our children were grown and away. Then we went to a TT and now are on our second 5th wheel. But when the family gets together we reminisce about those pop up days. Those were good days. We are now in our 70’s but it all started in our 30’s. That first pup up was nothing more than two beds with a space in between. It was a used Sears I bought for $100 just to see if our family would like camping. We’ve come a long way to our fireplace and central air. What a trip.

Snayte
1 year ago
Reply to  James Beirlein

We had an old Sears pop up when I was a teen. My dad rebuilt that thing from nearly the frame up. Us kids never got to sleep in there though, we were in tents mom and dad got to be off the ground.

Great memories.

Michael Gardner
1 year ago

We too, started in a Jayco pop up!

Randy Bitner
1 year ago

This is a shame. Young families who what to get into camping, folding trailers was the way I started, with a Jayco. We traveled all over the east cost while my two children were growing. Then they away and produced grandchildren. Traded in our folding trailer on a hy-bred. As they grew fast, then traded to a 5th wheel. Started in my early 30,s, now in my late 60’s.