Do you most often buy your fuel based on brand or price?

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Are you loyal to a particular brand of gasoline or diesel fuel for your car, truck or RV? Or do you buy mostly on the price per gallon?

In most instances, what is most important to you? It may take a moment for the poll to appear, so please stand by.

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Ken Sims
3 months ago

I try to use a brand of gasoline that’s Top-Tier rated.

Wayne
3 months ago

As for diesel I look for 1) the percentage of biodiesel, 2) the probability of the fuel being fresh, 3) the price. I try to buy fuel that is less than 5% biodiesel from a station that looks like It has a high turnover.

rich
3 months ago

always convenience, usually flying j’s rv lanes.

PennyPA
3 months ago

Always price. Sometimes convenience. I don’t go out of my way for price though. We never stop for just one night so we don’t have the problem of “easy in/out”. If we have to stop enroute, it’s truck stops for us. The Loves and Pilots around here charge more than locals for their diesel. If you’re saving 5 or 10 cents a gallon, that just brings it down to what the local prices are.

Denny
3 months ago

Always Pilot, Loves. Easy in /out. I have seen and heard about those MH’s that get caught in smaller stations, those that jockey around trying to get into or out to save a few bucks. Go with Experienced
Drivers so I don’t have trouble, don’t have to Wait just in and out.

Captn John
3 months ago

I have a 2019 F350 dually. I always avoid Murphy and Walmart. When pulling I always use truck stops for convenience and price. Sadly, P/FJ only gives 9 cents off Good Sam Elite members. With the TSD/EFS card Loves discounts dropped to 16 cents a gallon. They used to be 1st choice, now only above P/FJ. My last fill was at Petco, the saving was 48 cents. Fill of truck (48 gall0n) and aux tank 68 gallon was pumped so the saving was noticeable. Prior fill was at TA, more gallons pumped and the discount was higher as well. I’ve been using TSD/EFS since they started the program and I’m grateful for the savings!

Dennis G
3 months ago

Like most have said, we go on price, and accessibility. We do our best to stay with major brands of gasoline, but occasionally you don’t have that luxury on rural roads.

We do our best to trip plan, use google maps and street-view to see what access the gas station/s have, well before we plan our stops.

Michael
3 months ago

I too use the TSD/EFS card. Have only stopped at Love’s so far. Last fill-up on AZ – CO trip was $1.29/gal. That’s not a typo.

Kurt Shoemaker Sr
3 months ago

With the Pilot/Flying J card I save 5 cents per gallon. So I usually look for that gas station.

TravelingMan
3 months ago

Here are three articles about the differences in fuels (brand A to Z). There is no real difference in the actual fuel coming out of the pump. Years ago, there used to be significant differences. Regulations took all that away. Now, the differences are indistinguishable.

https://blogs.platts.com/2010/08/23/unbranded_vs_br/

https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Business/story?id=2978563&page=1

https://www.thoughtco.com/does-it-matter-where-get-gas-607905

Renee
3 months ago
Reply to  TravelingMan

This is good to know. Thank you. My entire life I’ve been told to never buy my gas at a Casey’s. I haven’t…… yet, logically, I know they would probably have to have (at least at a minimum) a regulated standard, across the board.

Tom
3 months ago

If RVing it would be the ability ease of in and out then price.

Brad
3 months ago

Gas is delivered to the fuel terminal nearby via a pipe line & when the fuel truck driver pulls up to load up he/she uses a fuel card to tell the terminal system what additives go in the gas as it fills the truck. Gas is gas!

TravelingMan
3 months ago
Reply to  Brad

Exactly! I watched this over and over when I was working in construction at a fueling terminal. ANY truck could pull up. They would receive the fuel from the terminal. There are what’s called “markers” in the fuel so that one gas station brand won’t/can’t receive another brand’s fuel. Its added at the terminal. If it is one brand, they put the fuel into the tanker and add the secret ingredients (additives) with the push of a button. Fuel is fuel without those additives. And those additives are the gimmicks to get you to buy their brand. Prove to me that there are thousands of car using brand X and as a result have had a ton of mechanical repairs as a result. There is ZERO evidence of this. It’s always the Owner who fails to maintain the vehicle or the station that fails to maintain their tanks. I also worked at several refineries….

Bob Weinfurt
3 months ago

If I’m traveling, it’s by price. For winter storage, I’ve found that a good brand name gasoline stays stable a little longer.

TravelingMan
3 months ago
Reply to  Bob Weinfurt

Whether it is gas or diesel, just add stabilizers if you’re going to store your RV. For gas, the product breaks down faster than diesel. In a previous job, I had responsibility for fuel (both gas and diesel – also propane and JP and JP-5). I would purchase enough gas to ensure a 30 day supply. Diesel, I would purchase in 6 month supplies. I had test kits for both. If the diesel sat for 6 months, I would test and add Cetane stabilizers if required. We always used the gas so fast I never had to actually add stabilizers for that. I had the tanks inspected regularly and the filters were changed. Using 3 micron filters or less on diesel was common practice. I paid more for the 1 micron filters because studies show that 3-7 micron particles can cause injectors to foul.

For my personal diesel, I purchase aftermarket Cetane boosters with additives to keep the injectors clean. I also go by the Ram Manual and service regularly.

Bob Weinfurt
3 months ago
Reply to  TravelingMan

I had a bad experience using gasoline stabilizer several years ago. Only had enough for two of my four snowmobiles. Come the next winter, they didn’t run very well so had to tear down and clean the carburetors on them. The other two ran fine. They all were the same models using the same fuel so I deduced it must’ve been the stabilizer.

Bob Weinfurt
3 months ago
Reply to  TravelingMan

Just to let you know, I use ethanol-free gas in all my small engines.

TravelingMan
3 months ago
Reply to  Bob Weinfurt

Just curious…Did you run the engine with the stabilizer in the unit? Just pouring it into the tank is of no benefit. I suspect you likely did. Just wanted to hear it from you for clarification.

John Lacher
3 months ago

I base it on price.

R Mutell
3 months ago

I have been driving for over 50 years and have always bought by price. I have read many times that the fuel sold today is basically the same. I’ve probably driven a couple of million miles and never had a problem with bad gas. Use gas buddy and pick out the cheapest gas on my route. Now I tow a 5th with a diesel truck and the only time I don’t use the cheapest station is if it’s not able to accommodate my truck and 39′ trailer, then I go to the next cheapest.

TravelingMan
3 months ago
Reply to  R Mutell

In about 1975 or 76, I had purchased bad gas from a small station. The truck basically made it about a block. The repairs at that time were somewhere around $400-500 dollars. When the station was confronted, they initially were not going to pay for the repairs. But I saved a fuel sample for them. It was loaded with sediment and water. After that (and a few others stepping up with the same problem) they paid for the repairs. Other than that, I have not had any issues. If that happens today, an engine can be trashed.

Roy Ellithorpe
3 months ago
Reply to  TravelingMan

Tell me that you didn’t have a fuel filter. Pretty sure they didn’t use fuel injection in the 70s, so whatever got past your filter plugged up your carburetor. Nothing that got through there damaged your engine.

TravelingMan
3 months ago
Reply to  Roy Ellithorpe

Yep…The service shop at that time rebuilt the carb and flushed out the fuel tank. They probably cleaned the fuel lines as well. I was not that old at the time. I don’t have the memory for everything they did. Labor is labor.

Cheryl
3 months ago

Easy in and out. Often Chevron’s are the most convenient.

Bounder
3 months ago

1 – best price
2 – easy in & out
3 – best price
4 – I think you get the idea….

Jeff Craig
3 months ago

When you fuel up at Costco, PFJ or Safeway (nearly exclusively) you get the best of both worlds!

That said, I look for brand, price and accessibility of the station to tank up my 35ft Georgetown Class A. For instance, when I tank up at Costco near my home north of Seattle, I don’t have to refuel until I hit the Costco in Coeur D’Alene, ID, or PFJ in Stansfield, OR or Seven Feathers Casino in Canyonville, OR – and I’ve verified how easy it is to get into each of them before I ever went thanks to Google Maps/Street View.

I keep a log of every trip we take, including fuel stops and mileage, so on future trips we can stop at the same place and know we won’t have any problems. Sometimes, it is worth paying an extra 5/10 cents a gallon at PFJ and know I can get in/out easily, than a knock-off station that may be on the other side of the highway.

Richard Olson
3 months ago

I choose a fuel station based on accessibility for my RV with Toad.

Gas Class A
3 months ago
Reply to  Richard Olson

Exactly! Us too. Accessibility is by FAR the most important thing to us.
Most large truck stop are unusable to us as the gas pumps are inaccessible to a motorhome with road. The orientation of the pumps is the entrance & office buildings make the turns too tight.

TravelingMan
3 months ago

I would propose that “quality” is not really an issue for 99% of the stations out there. If a person gets bad gas that trashes their engine, there will be litigation. Owners could not afford that. But, like I said earlier, I still try to find resources with quick turnover.

And to the point of some below, for gas, there are higher octane ratings. For diesel, there are higher cetane ratings. But, there are also maintenance practices. How well do you maintain your vehicle? It’s about risk. Keep that risk lower by purchasing fuel from resources you know move fuel. Then, maintain your vehicles. There are additives for gas and diesel to keep fuel injectors cleaner. But that does little if you don’t keep up with the EGR valves, plugs, and other engine components.