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RV Review: 2022 Jayco North Point 373BHOK fifth wheel, with a surprise room

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Today’s RV review is of the new 2022 Jayco North Point 373BHOK fifth wheel. As someone who is constantly looking at RVs, nothing is more exciting, sort of, than finding something I haven’t seen before. Yesterday we saw one new floor plan; today reveals another. 

Pigeonhole

I don’t really want to reveal what type of floor plan this is because, as some personal development coach told me, people associate things with certain words. For example, if I wrote that this is a toy hauler or couple’s camper, you might already have some preconceived notion of what you’d be seeing. 

Let’s just say that, like those Tootsie Pops that the owl licked in those 1970s TV commercials, there’s absolutely a surprise in here. 

Your first sign of this would be to walk around the outside of the rig and you’ll see something you may not have ever seen before. This model has a rear slide. Not on the side. I mean coming out the rear of the unit adding about three feet to the back. We gotta see what’s going on here. 

Back room in the Jayco North Point 373BHOK

Ignoring the really nicely appointed interior for the moment, though it’s not easy to do, we head back to the back where there’s an actual staircase leading up to a second-floor loft. Well, that’s not something you see every day. But it’s also not in the slide we saw from the outside. 

Instead, that loft is above a bathroom on the ground floor of this unit. That bath features a toilet on one side of the sliding doorway and a sink on the other. 

Beyond the bathroom is where the surprise lies—an entire separate room back here. That room features a couch that occupies the slide box with a folding bunk above that. Yep, it’s a whole second den back here. 

Like a den, there is actually a closet, some drawers and even a TV here. It really is a good place to come and get away from others. Considering that there’s a door to the bathroom, the bathroom, then another sliding door to this den it’s pretty well closed-off from the rest of the camper. 

Main living space

I had mentioned that it would be tough to go through the main living space without stopping and looking around. This really is a beautifully appointed fifth wheel. There are upscale finishes and touches throughout, as you would expect from a higher-end RV. 

One of the biggest differences between something like this and your everyday or even nicer trailer is details in the ceiling, including lighting and fixtures. 

That’s true of cabinetry and appliances at eye level as well with a large Insignia range, residential-style convection microwave and residential Whirlpool refrigerator. 

One of the surprises on this is that Jayco has a hatch outside the trailer that lets you get to the back of this residential refrigerator. This could make winterization easier or just be a spot if the fridge needs repair. Either way, it’s a really thoughtful aspect of the design. 

Other features in the Jayco North Point 373BHOK

Aside from the nifty separate rear den, this also has a very nice upstairs bathroom with a spacious shower that features a teak seat that folds down. 

I’ve also stated that Jayco’s JaySMART™ lighting—which flashes side marker lights and upper marker lights with your turn signal—is such a good feature it should be a legal requirement. But only Jayco has it. 

Observations

For the most part there isn’t much to pick at in something like this. It’s well executed with a luxury feel to the materials.

I would say that the king-sized bed really occupies so much of the slide box upstairs that there are little tables on each side, although they do have cup holders.

This also has Jayco’s fresh water system which incorporates a water bottle that has a spigot at the kitchen sink. Arguably this is for fresh drinking water but, when I went on the Jayco factory tour, I think we annoyed the tour guide with the insistence that we fill that five gallon bottle with bourbon so it’s always on hand.

It could work.

I’m not a fan of power-operated theater seats just because you can flip the foot rest down in a moment’s time if it’s manual, but you’re sitting there waiting when it’s power. But people like these.

In summary

Notice I didn’t put anything about boondocking and travel access. Large fifth wheels and almost all rigs with opposing slides basically aren’t the greatest for travel access, and this is no exception. But I don’t suspect many people prioritize this in larger RVs like this. 

As mentioned, I was very curious about what was in the back slide room. It was really unusual and would make a great den. But the whole interior really has a very upscale feel to it. 

While the obvious customer for this fifth wheel, which is technically a bunkhouse, is a family, this isn’t such an in-your-face bunkhouse that it wouldn’t serve a couple well, too, or someone who brings other campers occasionally. 

Further, that bunk room could very easily be used as an office. No matter what, this would be a nice place to spend some time. 

More from Tony

I would love to read your comments and suggestions over on our new forums, where you can weigh in and start or join a discussion about all things RV. Here’s a link to my RV Reviews Forum.

If you’re RV shopping here are some tips on RV shopping from a former RV salesperson—me!

Tony comes to RVtravel.com having worked at an RV dealership and been a lifelong RV enthusiast. He also has written the syndicated Curbside column about cars. He also works closely with a number of RV manufacturers to get an inside look at how things are done and is a brand ambassador for Rockwood Mini Lite with his wife, Peggy.

You can also check out his RV podcast with his wife, Peggy. 

These RV reviews are written based on information provided by the manufacturers along with our writer’s own research. They are based on information from a single unit and may not reflect your actual experience. Shop your RV and dealership carefully before making a buying decision. We receive no money or other financial benefits from these reviews. They are intended only as a brief overview of the vehicle, not a comprehensive critique, which would require a thorough inspection and/or test drive.

Got an RV we need to look at? Contact us today and let us know in the form below – thank you!

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Bob M
4 months ago

Nice size oven, but I’d never buy it with the schwintek slide.

Steve H
4 months ago

You’re right, Tony. A 40′ fifth wheel with a 2-3′ rear slide and a one-ton (or larger) duellie to tow that 16000# GVWR isn’t going to be stopping in a Walmart parking lot for groceries or spending the night in a Flying J RV parking space. So road access is a moot point. Besides crowded parking lots, it won’t fit in most national park or USFS campsites. Having the total length of an over-the-road semi, there are not going to be many places to park it but an RV “resort” with FHU sites!

Roger Spalding
4 months ago
Reply to  Steve H

All bigger Jaycos are built with the expectation of boondocking or dry camping; especially Eagles, Northpoints and Pinnacles. A 75 gallon freshwater tank with separate drinking water tap speaks to self containment like few others. Plus, the black and grey tanks mesh perfectly with the freshwater capacity. I like Jaycos alot. There only a couple of manufacturers which approach its distinguished reliability and durability of construction. The Overlander EXT solar system on the Northpoint and Pinnacle is the equal of a Montana’s Solar Flex 1200i, the Rolls Royce of solar systems. Any person who buys one of these rigs knows what he/she is doing. They don’t need or want a resort or “FPU” sites. They take it with them wherever they go. If you’ve ever been in a Northpoint or a Pinnacle you would see that Jayco is first cabin all the way.

Steve H
4 months ago
Reply to  Roger Spalding

This Jayco may have a lot of solar, but it’s going to use most of that power for that big residential refrigerator, plus a big battery bank to keep the fridge running all night. Or an inverter-generator running all night, in which case I wouldn’t want to be dry camping or boondocking anywhere near it.

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