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RV Review: Winnebago Hike 100 – A game-changing adventure trailer

Wow! Smaller is better! At least when it comes to the way a lot of new RV shoppers are looking at things. And one of the things they’re going to like quite a bit is the new Winnebago Hike 100. The Hike 100 is the smallest member of the Winnebago Hike family. In fact we’ve looked at the Winnebago Hike 210RB in the past. This new 100-series is actually comprised of several models and the more I looked, the more intrigued I was. 

Goals

Winnebago’s goal in creating the new Hike 100 was to create a trailer that was rugged enough for back-country travel, be capable of extended-season camping, be large enough to live in, plus be towable by smaller SUVs. I think they nailed it. Although some of you, admittedly, might not want to live in a trailer this size.

Innovation in the Hike 100

When Winnebago introduced the Hike series, it made a splash in that it had an exoskeleton design that enabled you to attach Thule accessories to the frame. So you could use this for bike racks, kayak racks, ski racks and all sorts of other gear. It really expanded the functionality of the trailer and allowed people to bring the adventure gear right along with them that they needed for those Instagram shots. 

There’s also a 2” receiver hitch on the back, so you can further add stuff to the exterior of your Hike. 

There are even further examples of Winnebago innovating with this newer version of the Hike. Those include several floor plans that just impress the heck out of me. 

Off grid

The Hike 100 is really well thought out for those who want to go where the road isn’t. For example, unlike most travel trailers, this one features 2” thick walls with radiant foil insulation in the roof. So insulation is really a strong point of this trailer. Those walls are laminated using Azdel substrates. Holes for windows and such are cut using computer-guided CNC machines. 

A 190-watt solar panel is standard with provisions to add a second solar panel. You can use that solar power to operate the Hike 100’s portable induction cooktop. That means you can cook inside or use the rear area for food prep – much like a teardrop trailer. 

Yep. Inside. The Hike 100 has a full stand-up interior despite its diminutive footprint. It’s kind of like a phone booth. Well, with a shower. And toilet. 

Yes, there’s a wet bath here, too, in the front of the trailer. It features a cartridge toilet– which makes a lot of sense to me. You can take the cartridge to a camp toilet or even a pit toilet and resolve those issues in short order. 

Awnings on the Hike 100

There is a batwing awning that covers the rear and road side of the trailer, plus a traditional power awning on the camp side. There are extensions you can get for the batwing awning that actually create an enclosed space. There’s an outdoor shower there with hot and cold running water. Using this, you can clean off what the adventures brought on and not fill your gray tank. Of course, you’ll want to use environmentally friendly soaps and such if you choose this idea. 

The fenders are metal storage boxes that allow you to also use them as a table. You can also bring that portable induction cooktop out here and prepare meals. Or use it inside. Or bring it ‘round to the back where there’s a space much like a teardrop trailer (depending on the floor plan), so you can create meals back there. 

In fact, there’s also a Truma 12-volt cooler back there. So you really can use the space as a kitchen. 

Or use the space inside as a kitchen with its sink, convection microwave and extension surface that expands the amount of counter space you have. There’s a second fridge in there that’s a bar-sized fridge. And, kudos to Winnebago – it can operate using 12 volts. 

Plus, there’s an inverter (specs TBD). So you can operate that induction cooktop or even things like CPAP machines and the like. 

Floor plans

You might think that this rig is so small it’s essentially nothing much more than a bed inside. But that’s not true. In fact, there are prototypes in Robert Morales’ video where there is a dinette that folds down to a bed with a second bed over that. 

Or, there are models with a Murphy bed for nighttime and a couch by day. 

In fact, I think we should all start calling this the Tardis instead of the Hike 100. That’s because it’s almost magical how Winnebago has utilized the interior space. I believe this is a game-changing model that totally breaks the mold in terms of small trailers. 

Watch Winnebago’s video about the Hike 100 here:

In summary

It’s not often that I see a new model trailer making the scene that’s this radically different in terms of features and floor plan. But the Winnebago Hike 100 series absolutely is. In fact, in terms of trailers under 3,000 pounds, this is quite likely the most well-conceived model on the market. 

So, if you’re in the market for a smaller travel trailer, I think you’d be making a mistake not waiting to look at the Hike 100 series before you make a final decision. Yes, it’s that significant a product. 

Tony comes to RVTravel having worked at an RV dealership and been a life long RV enthusiast. He also has written the syndicated Curbside column about cars. You can find his writing here and at StressLessCamping where he also has a podcast about the RV life with his wife. 

These RV reviews are written based on information provided by the manufacturers along with our writer’s own research. We receive no money or other financial benefits from these reviews. They are intended only as a brief overview of the vehicle, not a comprehensive critique, which would require a thorough inspection and/or test drive.

Got an RV we need to look at? Contact us today and let us know in the form below – thank you!

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REVIEW OVERVIEW

Game changing floor plans
Exoskeleton

SUMMARY

The Hike 100 is the newest and smallest member of the Winnebago adventure-focused travel trailer family and is such a game changing model it's really a must-see for anyone in this space.

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Justin
7 days ago

Hmmm, there’s lots to like & not-like about this.

I’ve boondocked with a ~5gal cassette toilet. 2 people lasts 3-4 days MAX — and that’s if people are OK going behind bushes when possible. I can stretch ~10gal of water over 3-4 days w/ 2 people. Showering outdoor means even less grey water collected. So the Hike 100 will run out of pooping power faster than fresh water. That big grey tank (size) should be sacrificed to pack in more black tank. My general impression is campground RVers — I do like you all! — don’t realize how little grey water needs to be packed out by boondockers. Hopefully a Hike 200 will adjust the tank sizes.

I do like the hauling capacity here: roof rack for kayaks & 2″ rear hitch for bikes. Not the usual, whimpy 1.5″ hitch. Good stuff starting @ Winne. Adam looks to be a great guy.

david
10 days ago

That is one nice trailer. Great review Tony. I love the innovativeness in this new RV. Things I really like: the exterior frame components for mounting things on , the receiver hitch in the back, the fold up bed, the size! A lot of vehicles out there today can pull this trailer. Oh, and plenty of storage. It should cool down nicely on hot summer days.

billh42
10 days ago

Cute. What’s it going to be when it grows up?

Scott R. Ellis
10 days ago

Sweet little trailer. However . . . STOP WITH THE CPAPS AND INVERTERS STUFF! NO CPAP requires an inverter: they all have available simple DC power cords which either power the machine directly with 12v or step the camper’s 12v up to 24v. Either option is much superior to inverting 12v up to 120v and then choking it back down to 12v or 24v.

Sorry. Pet peeve, and an incredibly common misconception.

Scott R. Ellis
9 days ago
Reply to  Tony Barthel

RV Travel should run an article on this topic. Thanks, Tony.