Thursday, August 5, 2021
Thursday, August 5, 2021

Ten safest and ten most dangerous states for driving

Here’s some good news for anyone including RVers about to hit the road: Motor vehicle crashes across America are killing fewer people – especially children.

In 2018, yearly deaths from motor vehicle accidents fell by nearly 1,000 people from the previous year, and with a drop of more than 10% among children, according to 2018 data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Fatalities related to speeding saw an almost 6% decline. Deaths from drunk driving dropped about 4% and made up just over a quarter of traffic deaths, the lowest percentage in more than 35 years.

Those heartening statistics come even as people drive more and are part of a 40-year downward trend. Experts point to a raft of safety measures, from increased use of seat belts to vehicle improvements such as air bags and electronic stability control.

But there are some sober warnings among the numbers

Regarding motor vehicle accidents, more than 6,000 pedestrians died, the most since 1990, and motorcycle fatalities were up by almost 5%. The same was true for bicyclist deaths, which were up more than 6%, as well as an almost 1% increase for the occupants of large trucks.

For those of you who live in cities, here is a trend to keep an eye on: Over the last decade, deaths due to motor vehicle accidents in urban neighborhoods have been on the rise, and have surpassed deaths in rural areas since 2016. Among the kinds of accidents that have become deadlier in cities, pedestrian deaths were up 69%, bicycling deaths were up 48%, and motorcycle deaths were up 33%.

Reviews.com compiled a list of the most dangerous states for driving using data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and from analysis by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. There were a total of 36,560 deaths as a result of motor vehicle crashes in the U.S. in 2018, the year these figures cover. States are ranked by 2018 fatalities per 100 million vehicle travel miles. The data was released in 2019.

The ten safest states for driving

10) Connecticut (0.93 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -56% change since 1975)

9) Wisconsin (0.89 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -73% change since 1975)

8) Washington (0.88 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -72% change since 1975)

7) Maryland (0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -68% change since 1975)

6) Utah (0.81 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -76% change since 1975)

5) New York (0.76 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -79% change since 1975)

4) Rhode Island (0.74 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -62% change since 1975)

3) New Jersey (0.73 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -66% change since 1975)

2) Minnesota (0.63 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -79% change since 1975)

1) Massachusetts (0.54 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -80% change since 1975)

Firefighting paramedics remove an injured motorist after an accident in Los Angeles County.

The ten most dangerous states for driving

10) Montana (1.43 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -72% change since 1975)

9) New Mexico (1.43 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -74% change since 1975)

8) Oklahoma (1.44 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -57% change since 1975)

7) Alaska (1.46 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -67% change since 1975)

6) Kentucky (1.46 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -58% change since 1975)

5) West Virginia (1.51 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -65% change since 1975)

4) Arizona (1.53 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -63% change since 1975)

3) Louisiana (1.53 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -67% change since 1975)

2) Mississippi (1.63 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -57% change since 1975)

1) South Carolina (1.83 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles, -54% change since 1975)

Related:

Tips for Interstate highway RV driving

Driving advice from AAA

##RVT992b

Comments

Subscribe
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

13 Comments
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Uncle Swags
4 months ago

Clearly the authors of this bit have relied on one statistic (deaths) and have no hands on experience. The number of accidents has been rising in every state and just getting maimed can be considered dangerous. Based on my experience the most dangerous states and worst drivers are Texas (violent driving habits); California (entitled narcissists); Illinois; NJ (diverse multi-cultural stupidity). My study is based on observing driving behavior both in state and out of state. And ask the people – everyone hates the Texans and Californians when they come to town.

And South Dakotans are still the friendliest and most courteous in my experience.

John Skinner
4 months ago

Just another quick update I failed to put in my comments. The increase in deaths is the largest single year increase since 1924! Please drive safely.

John Skinner
4 months ago

Thought you might like to know the latest figures. According to the latest National figures 42,060 people lost their lives in 2020 vehicle mishaps. Out of that number, almost 7600 were pedestrians. All of this in a year in which there was much less driving due to COVID. Pedestrians deaths are increasing because of more distractions, one of those being cell phones in the hands of both drivers and pedestrians. Thankfully the auto industry keeps making cars safer, or we would still be killing 50,000 like we did in 1980. Hey people! Pay attention. One more thing. Would you grownups try to be a good role model for our kids? Automobiles are the number one killer of teens from 15-19 in America. I would like to tell the kids in my Driver Education Classes that you are all going to do better.

Philip Sponable
4 months ago

Bring back the Pinto…!!!

Laurie
4 months ago

Sorry but this article is outdated and does not reflect all the newbie (inexperienced) RV’s out there!

Scott R. Ellis
4 months ago

That’s a classic example of how statistics can give a deceiving impression. The “worst” state is more than three times as “bad” as the best? Sure . . . and yet even in the worst, the numbers are incredibly low.

Tom
4 months ago

Having lived in Mississippi for several years, I am not surprised. This has got to be one of the worst States for the condition of the motor vehicles on the road. I once saw a car, travelling at speed, with three of the four tires being the lousy “spare tires.”

Gary
4 months ago
Reply to  Tom

The roads in Mississippi are also the worst.

friz
4 months ago

The article is more aptly named “the 10 Deadliest States…” At any rate, your “deadliest” state, SC, has reduced fatalities by 54% since 1975. Hardly something to be ashamed of.

Wayne Caldwell
4 months ago

Seeing New Mexico in the top 10 worse drivers listing doesn’t surprise me. We are consistently in the “top 10 worst” in almost any list, be it education or auto thefts, or….

Rik
4 months ago

Most dangerous state? The state of intoxication.
Being serious, speed kills. The odds of a fatality occurring zoom up for anyone exceeding 80 mph. Given today’s higher speed limits which are often near or at 80 mph, more people will die as a result.

Bob P
4 months ago
Reply to  Rik

Population control

Dan
4 months ago
Reply to  Rik

Years ago, make that decades ago, my friends and I were young and bullet proof and laughed about the near misses we had while driving drunk. As we got older we matured and realized we were risking others health and lives, not just our own, driving drunk. Now, when we get together, if we drink, we stay put. I have absolutely ZERO tolerance for impaired drivers, and I wish more judges would feel the same way.

Follow us!

31,714FansLike
26,262FollowersFollow
66,000SubscribersSubscribe