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KOA campground creates solar array to power entire park

The Kansas City East/Oak Grove KOA Holiday has created an innovative, green project to bring power to their camping guests. The campground is unveiling a newly-constructed solar array capable of supplying all of the power needs for the park and its campers.

Located east of Kansas City near Oak Grove, the new solar field has the ability to produce more than 470,000 kWh of power annually. The average American home, in comparison, generally requires about 10,000 kWh each year. This means the campground’s solar array would be able to power nearly 50 homes.

“Campground guests use more electricity than most people realize. In fact, electricity is our third highest expense,” says campground owner Andrea Nuemann. “This is their temporary home away from home and modern RVs have multiple devices to power from air conditioners to TVs and everything in between.”

In addition to creating a reliable power supply, the new solar array is a green initiative that will reduce CO2 emissions. The system is expected to save over 15,000 tons of CO2 over its lifetime. This is equivalent to planting 360,000 trees or a 31-million-mile reduction in auto miles.

“Campers by definition appreciate nature so we think many will like that the park has gone solar,” affirms Nuemann.

Implementing solar power is just one of the many ways that Nuemann is making her campground greener. The park has also converted to LED lighting and planted more than 375 trees and bushes. More planting is planned for the spring with the goal of adding to the beauty of the campground and reducing air and noise pollution generated by the nearby expressway.

The Kansas City East/Oak Grove KOA Holiday is located at 303 NE 3rd Street in Oak Grove, Missouri. To make reservations, please call Kansas City East/Oak Grove KOA Holiday at (816) 690-6660 or by visiting their website.

SOURCE: KOA press release

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Paul S Goldberg
6 months ago

Interesting reading. Much of the negative is based on leased systems where the power generator installs the system and charges the facility a lower rate than they would get from the grid. It is correct that this does not always pencil out favorably. Opposition to solar NOT based on these numbers, based on buying the system outright, but on extraneous factors require a lot more research. Failure to weatherproof any system is just foolish. I will wait for Mike Sokol’s in depth analysis before I make any judgement.

Phil Atterbery
6 months ago

Did they also install a backup generator system to power the park when the solar & the commercial grid go down?

Member
Mike Sokol (@mike)
6 months ago
Reply to  Phil Atterbery

I suspect a lot of battery storage and inverters, but I don’t know enough yet. Please Stand By…

Joe
6 months ago
Reply to  Mike Sokol

Mike, also look at Volt Amp Reactance (VARS) and how solar deals with it. I would imagine that they are still connected to the grid during the day as most solar farms are which will make VARS a moot point. However VARS which for the most part is controlled by a rotating mass will become an important issue with more solar and battery storage coming on line and traditional power plants going off line.

Richard
6 months ago

There are many studies showing the carbon footprint of solar and wind energy is larger than fossil fuel. They state a “Quantum Leap” in technology is needed before replacing fossil is feasible.
Some states don’t buy back elect. from solar grids. Some areas add a tax to support The Grid these people are only using at night.
Until we find a renewable, cheap source of dilithium crystals…. we’re stuck with fossil.

Member
Mike Sokol (@mike)
6 months ago
Reply to  Richard

I’m not sure those are non-biased studies, but if you send me a link I’ll review them and write about it.

Joe
6 months ago

I think solar energy does have a place on electrical grid but it does come with a hefty price.
– Most of the worlds polysilicon for the production of solar cells come from China
– Most of the refractive glass for the solar panels comes from China.
– Most of the worlds solar cells come from China.
– The infrastructure and energy to produce the above is power hungry and a very dirty business using chemicals that are not that friendly to the environment.
– The Chinese Government subsidies a vast portion of the production costs.
-Recently the Chinese government has shut down a good portion of the above citing environmental concerns driving up the cost of solar panels.
– The disposal of solar panels is considered a hazardous waste.
– Last Google “Texas 100% renewable experiment”, September 19,2019 from Power Magazine.

Ron T.
6 months ago

Possibly all these comments are tongue-in-check. Otherwise they ignore that fact that these solar power systems are connected to the regular power grid so there’s no problem at night. Also, when the campground is producing more power than it uses, the local power companies are required to pay them for that extra power going into the grid.

Kimberly G.
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron T.

I sure hope so, Ron T. 🙂

Tony Grigg
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron T.

I’m hoping you have knowledge of this project in stating those facts. I was wondering about exactly those added facts as I read the article.

Member
Mike Sokol (@mike)
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Grigg

I’ve already contacted that KOA campground to find out more intel. And I’m proposing a cross-country road trip this summer with an EV pulling a small RV trailer. With enough funding I’ll drive it from Maryland to California and back. Stay tuned…

Member
Mike Sokol (@mike)
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron T.

I’m actually beginning to study this in-depth. And you all know how deep I like to go.

Tommy Molnar
6 months ago

More feel-good boloney.

“The system is expected to save over 15,000 tons of CO2 over its lifetime.”

That’s a lot of trees being deprived of what they need to live and give off oxygen for US.

Good point Bob P. The CG rules will state that if the sun is up, you can plug in your TV. If the sun is down or cloud covered, light your candles or flashlights. Love the “green”.

Chic Sanders
6 months ago

What has the nightly camping fee gone to from the pre-green conversion?

Bob P
6 months ago

What do they do when the sun goes down? Do they have a mandatory sundown bedtime? Since MO can be very hot in the summertime nights will it become a nudist camp to try to stay cool without a/c. Every time someone talks about GREEN it seems they never think far enough ahead to account for night. How much land does this park own that they can put up this many solar panels? Inquiring minds want to know!

Tony Grigg
6 months ago
Reply to  Bob P

I agree that the article lacked a lot of important information. It isn’t RV Travel’s fault, as they only reposted the item from another source, but the author could certainly have been more thorough. Likely this was just a marketing announcement from KOA.

Member
Mike Sokol (@mike)
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Grigg

I’m on it…. so expect more intel from me in a few weeks.

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