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Several of my friends are quitting RVing. You can probably relate to why they’re doing so 

The end. Yes, I know that’s a strange way to begin an article, but it fits! Many of our friends are choosing to throw in the towel on their RV lifestyle. They are giving up RVing for good. They have valid reasons, I think. See if you agree.

High costs

Charles and Mary have owned four different campers and RVed in them for decades. Each winter, they leave behind their Minnesota home for warmer weather in the Arizona sunshine. But not this year. This winter they will hunker down for what will undoubtedly be a shock to their systems. The reason they will remain in the frigid north rather than enjoy warm, sunny temps? Money. The campground where they’ve stayed for more than five years was bought out by a bigger company who upped the monthly rate. By a lot! “Given the increase cost of rent plus the higher cost of gas to make the trip, we just can’t afford to go,” Mary explains. She doesn’t look happy about the decision, though.

Poor quality

Dan and Jo are not too happy either. They ordered a new RV (their first-ever brand-new RV) several months ago. After finally taking ownership this past month, the couple took their new rig out for an overnight shake-down trip. “What a piece of junk!” Dan complained. “I expected to find a few things needing repair, but this? This is ridiculous!” Dan and Jo tried to return the camper to the dealership for repairs but were told the facility didn’t have space to store their RV until the repairs can be addressed. “I’m done,” Jo sighs. “I’m checking into our legal rights, seeing as we only had possession for 48 hours!”

Reservation hassles

Sean and Deb are also throwing in the towel. They sold their RV for more than they paid for it two years ago. “We just couldn’t pass up the opportunity!” Deb explains. “Besides, I’m tired of spending hours online or on the phone trying to make reservations. It’s killed my enthusiasm for camping. While everyone else unwinds by the campfire, I’m stuck inside at the computer trying to find the next place to stay. It’s just not fun for me anymore.”

What to do?

How sad. I sympathize with these folks. I really do. With costs of RVs going through the roof, along with gas prices, the cost of RVing is more than many people can stomach. Poor workmanship and a backlog of repairs needing to be done can certainly put the kibosh on camping. And securing a reservation? It is, at times, frustrating and defeating. But I’m not ready. Not just yet. I’m not ready to say goodbye to seeing new places, meeting different people, and enjoying the great outdoors. I’m still all in with RVing. I really want it to work. Just a few more years, at least. How about you?

Related:

New RVers opting out of lifestyle, some selling their rigs

##RVT1024

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Denny Wagaman
24 days ago

There are so many other factors that people quit Rving.
1. Health,
2. Maintenance (Not being able to do what they used to do) now paying to have it done
3. Boring (been there done that),
4. Other Hobbies now more exciting,
5. AGE just not worth all the work it takes getting ready, stress from driving, packing unpacking etc
6. Rising cost of everything else not associated with RVing
7. Rising cost for fuel, places to stay,

Sorry Neither I nor our RV friends have difficulty finding places to go.

With all the negativity in the story’s about people quitting RVing I bet there are more people taking it up. Time to get off of this and on to positive RVing, fun places to travel to, great RV’S to own, what improvements have you made to your RV that you really enjoy, and please who cares of you like paint swirls or not…. There is more to talk about just give me the open road to wherever…. For me it’s about the travel not the destination but that’s just me. 😂

Daniel D. Teoli Jr.
1 month ago

Got a old truck camper, no A/C. In summer it gets to 95 degrees inside. If I had more money I’d get a small Class C w A/C.

I am not much of a RV traveler in the traditional sense. I use it for my work, which is ‘my work’ and not paid work. I urban boondock 98% of the time. Only time I had trouble boondocking is in NYC and the springs in FL. But I don’t go to FL anymore. That was when I had more time for fun. Now it is all work.

I couldn’t afford to buy my TC again. Prices skyrocketed. So I try and take care of it and buy lotto tickets. In Jersey City / NYC it is $120 day w/hookups. I go in the summer when I can dry camp in their dirt parking lot for the bargain price of $85 a day with no hookups. It is very $$ to work in NYC.

I took a trip around mid-America, about 3,000+ miles. Boondocked all the way, truck stops, rest stops, hotel parking lots, Walmart, etc. Gas bill was close to $1,000 for a few days travel. As things decompose in the USA…these may be the good old days!

Last edited 1 month ago by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.
OldRattlesnik
29 days ago

Hello, my MotorHome is 3 yrs old.I have 3k miles on it,one trip to Indiana from N.Y.
Should have over 40k miles by now however trying to get fixed was as hard as trying to find a fully staffed resturant or Ammo.
SO even though under warranty and only weeks old,I had to fix what the Dealer fixed.
Then it was too late to travel out of Buffalo N.Y. where we’ve had 8ft of snow in one 26 hr. Period.
So winterize and lose all of the deposits on Campgrounds, etc.
Spring and Summer are incredible in W.NY.
So why leave then.Called the campgrounds in Sept. To make reservations and……all gone! Sold out until 2022

Judy Howard
1 month ago

I sold my stick house which I had rented out the last 6yrs while I was a fulltime rver and bought a stick home on the Oregon coast. I loved my fulltime RV lifestyle but felt pushed to give it up by several factors.
wanted out of southern California because it was crazy crowded and after traveling in wide open spaces I felt claustrophobic.
And then the ” new normal” sucked out any promise of joy with all its restrictions.
And finally the reports of crowded and expensive campgrounds and gas going thru the roof, I unhooked my “Short Story ” Smart Car and covered up my wonderful “Big Story” motorhome, sold my home in so Cal and am VERY LUCKY to have found my new lifestyle.
Writing my books ( I am an author), hiking, walking on the beach and along the rivers here on the Pacific in Brookings, Oregon. Let this crazy world whirl!

OldRattlesnik
29 days ago
Reply to  Judy Howard

My last reply just posted was in response to Judy’s comment. However the others are on same page.Its no fun no mo

Denny Wagaman
24 days ago
Reply to  Judy Howard

Good for you !

Lois T-D
1 month ago

I agree about the costs going through the ceiling! However, we are still going, at least for this winter. I made reservations for the winter months about 2 months ago. My husband is 87 and still able to do the prep and keep up with the small repairs. We just had a major fix which came to over $3000, this being on a 2017 TT on which we had the same thing done several years ago. So, as long as we are able to travel we will spend our winters in the warm south.

Daniel D. Teoli Jr.
1 month ago
Reply to  Lois T-D

87? You better keep moving. As you rest…you rust!

Good luck!!

Denny wagaman
24 days ago
Reply to  Lois T-D

Wonderful! Keep on keeping on as long as you can.

LARRY SPENCER
1 month ago

MOST OF SAME. THESE NEW RVERS HAVE NO RESPECT & DON”T KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING. CAMP GROUNDS GETTING IN SAD SHAPE. I USED TO GO TO FLORIDA KEYS 2X A TY. UNTILL DOUBLE THE PRICE & COULD NOT AFFORD ANYMORE. THAT WAS BK IN EARLY 2000. have been rving every year done now going to sell.

Edward
1 month ago

Today’s Rv buyers are suckers. It’s as simple as that.

Dave
1 month ago

I understand these folks. While I’m not ready to quit, these factors will be some of my reasons.

By the way, buying used does not reduce problems. RVs are nonstop preventive maintenance and repair from day one to the junk yard. Look at Dave’s suggested tools list.

Last edited 1 month ago by Dave
GAI
1 month ago

Is it required to type in BOLD to be an RVer?

Ken Moon
1 month ago

My wife and I have been planning for years to get a Class C camper when she retires next month.
Suddenly, prices are up 30% or more, brands like Winnebago are backed up for months, and quality, especially for RVs made in Elkhart, has gone down the toilet.
Should we wait a couple of years for folks to fix all the defects on their RVs, then get tired of it, hoping for a bargain?

Edward
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Moon

You should not purchase an rv. Planning and dreaming is great. You have a 50/50 chance of having numerous problems once you own an rv. I dreamt about it too. Now I will stay in motels and hotels. Mark my words. Don’t do it. Just examine the words on your query: 30% quality defects toilet

Daniel D. Teoli Jr.
1 month ago
Reply to  Edward

Yes, concur. Get a van or SUV, maybe a small trailer to haul some travel gear. Stay in motels for now.

Denny wagaman
24 days ago
Reply to  Edward

Sorry you feel that way but. I would urge them to do it before for whatever reason they can’t. What’s bad for one isn’t necessarily bad for another. Try it, you might like it. works for my wife and myself.

Nannette F McDonald
24 days ago
Reply to  Ken Moon

Hello Ken, Research the Camper you would like (Class C) and look at all your options. I would say your best option is to buy a good used camper that you have researched fully and then find one and look it over and have it inspected. Buying new does not mean you are getting the best camper. Most new campers have oodles and oodles of problems. My husband and I own a 2005 Class A DP. We researched the best Class A’s…went down in years until we could afford what we wanted and we have a beauty. Sure she needs maintenance and upkeep- but so does our house and cars. Don’t give up…It is a fun time!!

Marcus
1 month ago

As a disabled veteran on a fixed income, I can relate to this story. Fuel prices and seeing new campground owners double rates overnight has put a hurt on travel for my wife and myself. State parks are filled to capacity, people are parking on forest service roads here in north Idaho, we live in the woods so spending time camping here isn’t our idea of rv’ing. We like spending time in the desert and along the west coast ocean. Oregon coast is amazing. Finding free camping is not an option.
As far as junker rv’s we had that problem with a new 38 foot bumper pull, we had more warranty work done than what the rig cost us, and every trip was a nightmare when something new broke, we dumped that on a new fifthwheel, it is too big for most state parks so we also bought a small bumper pull for off grid camping. Yes 2 rv’s, which worked great but now we are selling both and staying home for the most part, even boating isn’t the same. Too many newbies with the mememe syndrome.

Barbara R Michael
1 month ago

I can understand the frustration of trying to get a spot in a campground. I was told by one of them people will book two or three different campgrounds pick one and then NM ot cancel the other ones. Bam! Spots remain empty because they are reserved and campground can’t rent the spot. Too many selfish people out there. This is the real me,me,me syndrome.

Dean
1 month ago

Oh well things cycle and now this will. I stopped before getting started due to a medical issue that unexpectedly came up. Sold our 40’ Newmar ( used purchase) after one use . Coach was not the issue it was not being able to use it until I did not know when or if ever. We decided it was better to sell it and it get used instead of rotting in place.

Edward
1 month ago
Reply to  Dean

Oh my gosh. Talk about a waste of time and money.

Shazadi
1 month ago

Good, more room for us.

Barbara R Michael
1 month ago
Reply to  Shazadi

That wasn’t nice to say. This is example of the me,ne,me syndrome.

J Jackson
1 month ago

We’ll never give up RVing. We believe in having a home base so we can come and go as we please.

Randy
1 month ago

An RV lifestyle that includes always being on the go and always looking for that next great spot is not for us! We have an RV resort in Illinois that costs us $1800 a year to stay from April 1-October 31st each year. We are not limited to the number of days we can stay and can be there for the entire seven months. In October, we head south to a similar small place in Georgia. We pay less for our spots than we paid in property taxes for a year in our sticks and bricks! We take side trips to other places, but we don’t go to a different spot every week or so. I want to enjoy retirement, not stress out over the price of a CG. This too will change and things will return to “normal.”

Asher
1 month ago

Keep telling people to stay home. That will make more room for us.

Dmkelley123
1 month ago

Tell us what you really think, Darlene.

Michael Janski
1 month ago

About people leaving RVing. Doesn’t RV stand for Recreational Vehicle? Your friends are using them as second homes. Of course it costs more. Second homes are an expensive luxury. Of course some RV’s are junk, pay a decent wage and have real quality control and junk won’t come out of the production line. These RVs are junk because the people who run the company allow it.

Jorg
1 month ago

Well, you need to RV the right way to avoid all these problems. First don’t buy new, but used. We got an excellent RV for 1/3 the new price that way. On quality, you have to review the mfg’s and model’s reputation. On reservations, there are plenty of BLM and Forest service lands that have plenty of space, don’t require reservations, are not only wonderful, but free! Of course if you want to vacation to the RV suburbs you’ll have to pay. But that’s not camping in my book.

Scott
1 month ago

Any news reporter worth their degree would be doing a story on the other half of the supply chain problem: poor quality. I guarantee you that anything being manufactured in the last 12 and for the next 12 months is garbage. I wouldn’t buy any car or electronic, and I’d really question some of our prepackaged foods.