Can you both get the rig home?

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    By Bob Difley
    Though becoming more balanced among couples, more men still drive their RVs than women. If you are the female half of a couple, imagine if you were out in the boonies and the driver were to become ill?

    You would have to learn how to drive the rig quickly — and at a most difficult time while under extreme stress. Don’t wait for that moment to happen. Start learning to drive the rig now, and then share the everyday driving to stay in practice.

    Don’t limit yourself to learning just how to drive: There are other things the regular “pilot” does to get the rig ready to travel. Do you know how to disconnect the power and water systems? Raise the automatic levelers? Hitch up the rig? All these are important aspects of getting under way with your RV. You and your other half should draw up a checklist together, and thoroughly practice “how-to-do’s” before the need arises.

    If you are the male driver, start giving your other half driving time — along with constructive and helpful assistance and encouragement. If you can’t provide the support and the temperament to make it work, hire a driving instructor. Do it.

    You can find Bob Difley’s RVing e-books on Amazon Kindle.

    ##RVT830

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    ScottA
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    ScottA

    As another option, my folks (both in their upper 70’s) pay for a service that will come in and drive their RV (truck and trailer) anywhere they need, in the case of an emergency.

    Jim Vierra
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    Jim Vierra

    What is the name of the Service Co.

    Thanks Jim

    Silvi
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    Silvi

    I couldn’t agree more! Knowing how to get the motorhome & tow car ready for travel & being comfortable driving our rig was vitally important on several occasions due to my husband’s health issues. Now that he has passed away I intend to downsize & keep traveling, maybe with a singles or women’s rv group, something I would not even consider if I were not already comfortable with everything involved.

    S. M
    Guest
    S. M

    It still boggles my mind at women who are ‘afraid’ to drive their rigs. Think about this scenario. Your partner has a medical situation while zipping down the highway. How afraid are you then if you can’t get the rig safely off to the side of the road and this horrible emergency is the first time behind the wheel? For heavens sake learn to drive it. I can’t tell you the times that men approached us at a gas station, etc with me behind the wheel and told my guy how lucky he was that I shared the driving. Of… Read more »

    Susan Callihab
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    Susan Callihab

    When we became full time RVers in 2016, we both took 5th wheel trailer driving lesson. We split driving 50-50. After he passed away in July 2017, I drove it back from Florida to Arizona with the help of my nephew. He could drive but had no clue about how to use the systems. But I did.

    Sue Conant
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    Sue Conant

    When we purchased our first Class A in 2000, I took RV driving lessons and hubby who had driven big rigs came along. Best $ well spent. We both still drive. And I can “do it all” if needed, it would just take me longer to unhook/hook up the car and outside services. One never knows when they are going to be put in that position.

    Nanci
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    Nanci

    While I know the “in’s and out’s” of setting up and taking down the motorhome I was definitely hesitant to drive it. Knowing an emergency situation could happen at any time it was important to learn. Started out slowly with a complimentary 1 hour lesson at an RV show and moved on to two day instruction with a school that has instructors across the country. Very beneficial! Seeing I am the designated dingy driver once we “land” the motorhome and my husband is fairly “directive”, I already knew he was NOT the one to show me how to drive the… Read more »

    Chris Chadwell
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    Chris Chadwell

    “Directve” LOL! I have one of them too. Thank you for sharing. I’m going to look into lessons.