RV Education 101: RV Buying Tips: What’s the best floor plan for you?

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By Mark Polk
RV EDUCATION 101®

RV Buying Tips: What’s the best floor plan for you?

After you have a good idea of the type and size of RV you want to purchase, you need to look at floor plans. RVs come in numerous floor plans, and you need to decide which one makes the most sense based on your requirements.

There are single-bed and multiple-bed floor plans. There are front-bedroom and rear-bedroom models. Think about where you want the kitchen located and what type of bathroom works best for you. Do you want an RV with no slide-outs, one slide-out, or multiple slide-outs?

Go inside the RV, sit down on the sofa and try to visualize you are camping in the RV. Where are the windows located? How much storage is there? Does the floor plan make sense based on all of your needs?

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Mark Polk’s tech tips are posted every Saturday in the RV Travel Newsletter and every Wednesday on the RV Daily Tips Newsletter.

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Dan Bowles
2 months ago

The best advice I received from experienced friends pertained to slides. Every dealer likes to show the expansiveness of an RV fully open. Our advice was to have the dealer close the slides on the MH we were considering, then go from the front to the back. If you can use it entirely when closed, it’s worth considering. They shared that using their bathroom is nearly impossible on the road, because it is a rear bath with a bed slide. To access the bath, you need to crawl over the bed. Priceless info.

PennyPA
2 months ago

Remember this when deciding how many slide outs you want: slide outs are heavy.

Also, I am really enamored of the front living room (in a fifth wheel). Does anyone here have one? Can you tell me the pros and cons of them…besides having to go up the steps.

Scott R. Ellis
2 months ago

We had several RVs over the years and time spent in them led us to several “deal-killer” design options. Some serious thought might substitute for experience. Here are a couple of ours that come quickly to mind: any bed design (usually “east-west”) that requires one person to crawl over the other to get in or out of bed. A fridge in the slide (that design precludes a normal roof exhaust, and while there are things that can be done to make up for this, they are complicated and/or noisy–think fans). Any major appliance in the slide–do you really want gas, electrical, or sewer lines flexing with every cycle? Etc.

The best advice is probably this: you will likely not remain happy with your first choice (or two, or three). Given that, buying used to start might be a very good plan.

steve s.
2 months ago

Campsites are ‘left-handed’. That is to say, when looking at the front of the RV, the living area of the campsite is on the left.
The campsite access doors are on the left.
All the action / activity takes place on the left.
As such, we want a coach with dinette on the left so that when eating meals or playing games, we can look out upon OUR campsite, not our neighbor’s.